Campbell Hausfeld compressor

A friend has a Campbell Hausfeld FP2003 portable direct-drive 2 gal. compressor with a burned out printed circuit control board. Is there a way a conventional control can be substituted by installing one in place of the pressure switch which signals the board? Anyone ever try this? C-H doesn't carry the board as a replacement part. TIA
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On Fri, 4 Nov 2005 16:00:13 -0600, "PanHandler"

You can just get a regular pressure switch. Be sure it is rated for the compressor size and if the PCB has the overload protection on it you will need a starter with O/L protection. My CH has an internally protected motor and a pressure switch.
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On Fri, 04 Nov 2005 05:28:44 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

You seem to understand the OP better than I did. What is the difference between a regular pressure switch and the one that is in there now?
If your CH is bigger than the OP's and mine, yours is probably a lot more complicated.
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On Fri, 4 Nov 2005 16:00:13 -0600, "PanHandler"

I don't understand. How would that solve the burned out pcboard?
Is the board burned out or is there only a problem with the pressure switch?
Do you plan to turn off the pump by hand when the pressure swtich tells you there is enough pressure? Why wouldn't you just continue to use the switch you have there now, which will do it automatcially?
One of the webpages for this says it has a " Built-in pressure switch that automatically switches off the air pump when the air tank is filled, and automatically switches the pump back on when the tank air pressure drops"
What could be better than that?
I have one just like yours, that I got along with a lawn mower at a junk yard for 20 dollars. It's a CH portable direct-drive 2? gallon compresser, and it had a burned out control board. It's maybe one model earlier than the ones they sell now, but apparently whatever weakness there is in the board hasn't been changed.. My airpressure switch probably works the same way yours does, but since I haven't had a manual I didn't know that. (I don't think there was a manual on-line) I had thought the pressure switch was only for malfunctions when the pressure was dangerously high. Now I realize it is a great feature, and I think I'll have to try again to get the manual, or look inside a box and read that manual.
.. The PCB is not very complicated. It only has a fuse, a bridge rectifier, maybe one condensor or resistor, and the rest is basically a bunch of connections to things that are not on the board, like the switch and the pressure switch and the pump motor.. Mine needed all of the following, a new fuse, a new bridge rectifier, and some wire traces repaired. It's a little surprising that it managed to blow the fuse, and traces, and at least 2 parts of the 4-part rectifier, but it did. (generally any one of these, esecially the fuse, would blow first, and that would protect the others.) Since I couldn't find a bridge rectifier of suitable size in my parts drawers, I used four 1 (or 2?) amp rectifiers, arranged as a bridge. That's what manufacturers used until someone put it all in one case, maybe 30 or 40 years ago. (You have to arrange the rectifiers the right way, and it is one step beyond what people have a tendency to expect. Post again if the rectifier(s) need replacing. It helps a lot to use a meter for the diagnosis.)
Everything works fine now.

You really don't need the board. Like I say, there are only about 3 parts on the board and the rest are parts off the board connected via the board.
I think a good step would be to remove the two screws holding the board in place, and then draw a wiring diagram. Then redraw the diagram keeping the connections the same, but arranging parts to be more logical and less based on the way the wires and the traces actually run, so that the schematic makes obvious sense. It will turn out to be like a lot of things: A cord, a rectifier from AC to DC, and a DC compressor motor, with 2 or more switches between the cord and the rectifier. The fuse counts as a switch, plus the pressure switch, and the on-off switch.
You can fix the board by running wires of sufficient size along the damaged wire traces, and soldering at each end. (that's what I did.) Or you can rearrange the wires, moving a wire from one end of a trace to the other end, so that some of the traces on the circuit board are not needed. This method might make things crowded and confusing and doesn't appeal to me.
This took almost as long to type as it took to do it, after I looked at if for a while and drew the schematic.
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wrote:

I bet there is a Triac on that board and it is just so they could use a cheap (not HP rated) switch. Electronics cost pennies in the far east The right switch will cost you about $20 but it should last forever.
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On Sat, 05 Nov 2005 00:33:09 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

No,sorry, there isn't.
I looked at my pump today, only from the outside, and although the plastic cover is rectangular instead of tapered like the ones they're selling now, it's the same model as the OP's, (although it has AV000 or something close on the end of the model number.)

I didn't get a good look at the switch because it is mounted on some metal part. Apparently it is supposed to light up. I don't remember if mine does or not. But other than the light, possibly, the swtich never failed.
There is a also a thermal protection switch in series with all the other switches. And I see the www.chpower.com does have the manual, etc. for this model, and I'm almost sure I dl'd it already.. The problem is that the manual is mostly safety procautions and two foreign languages, and a parts list, and I think there is less than a page of what I would call manual. And that is spread all over the place. But I nonetheless figured out that the pressure swtich is not for emergencies but for keeping the tank close to the specified pressure. For emergencies there is a totally mechanical pressure relief valve. (Which one is supposed to check reguarlly, fwiw.)

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And that is spread all over the

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