Caked fertilizer: best way to use?

We have half a large bag of Scott's SummerGuard fertilizer that has large caked lumps in it -- not clumps of granules, but huge "crystalline" blocks. I don't think it ever came in contact with water; rather, it absorbed moisture from the atmosphere.
It's too late to use it this year, but is there a reasonable way of using it next year? Dissolve it in water and spray it on the lawn? But how to calculate the application rate?
Perce
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 18:42:41 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"

My first option would be to call Scotts and see what they have to say. I think they may be able to help. Call Us. Scotts Help Center experts are available toll-free at 1-888-270-3714.
My next option would be to weigh portion of the good stuff and then spread it. If say, 5 pounds covered 500 feet you figure a pound per hundred. Then I'd dissolve a pound of the chunk in water and spray that over the same pound (or whatever) per hundred square feet. .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/05/13 06:49 pm, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Probably worth a try.

It might not be as simple as that: some substances "grab hold of" the water molecules when they get wet and then crystallize, so a given weight of the crystalline stuff might not be equivalent in potency to the same weight of the granules.
Perce
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That would be a waste of time. They would tell him to toss it in the trash and buy a new bag. They dont want to lose a sale!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, September 5, 2013 6:49:17 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

That fertilizer is made to dissolve slowly over time. If he dissolves it and then sprays it, he's getting nitrogen that is supposed to be released over about 4 to 6 weeks all at once. He could still do it, but he'd have to reduce the application rate appropriately. If he does, I'd start by testing it on a small section.
I'd say use it for something other than the lawn, but the formulation isn't very suitable for general plant use. And doesn't Summerguard have insecticide or herbicide in it too?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 18:42:41 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"

Soak it good with diesel fuel, then set off a blasting cap in the middle of it. that will break it up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/5/2013 5:42 PM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

I wonder if you could wrap the clumps in some old canvas or even an old towel then bust up the clumps with a hammer? O_o
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, September 5, 2013 5:42:41 PM UTC-5, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

. I don't think it ever came in contact with water; rather, it absorbed moi sture from the atmosphere. It's too late to use it this year, but is there a reasonable way of using it next year? Dissolve it in water and spray it o n the lawn? But how to calculate the application rate? Perce.
Canvas bag and sledge hammer or drive over it with a heavy vehicle. Or, di ssolve it with water and spray water on lawn, or use it around plants in a flower bed or foundation planting.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.