Cable TV Amplifier

I'm running coaxial burried in conduit out to my workshop that is approximately 180 feet from where the cable enters the house. I've been told that I will need a signal amplifier.
Where does this amplifier hook up to ?? At the beginning of the run or can it be installed at the end ?? Does this amplifier need to be plugged into an outlet ?? If this needs to go at the beginning of the run and powered up, how can I do this if the splitter is mounted to the fascia on the outside of the house ??
Thanks,
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Makes sure you get good-quality coax. cable (RG-6, not RG-59), then try it first without an amp. at all. You might be surprised.
Perce
On 06/04/05 09:30 pm Ray tossed the following ingredients into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

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On Sat, 4 Jun 2005 20:30:13 -0500, Ray wrote:

In series with the coaxial cable to your workshop. It will have one input connector and one output connector, and maybe a separate power supply connector.

Either, but you'll probably get better results if you put it at the beginning of the run.

Yes. It will probably come with a "wall wart" power supply.

I don't know. For long cable runs to an antenna, there are amplifiers available that mount at the antenna, and use the coax to feed power to it. So the power supply would go in your workshop. Because the frequency range of cable TV is different from off-the-air TV, I don't think one of those devices would work for all of the channels on the cable. But there may be something like that specifically for cable TV.
Be aware, if you have a set-top box, you may have to get a "two-way" amplifier. Many set-top boxes, especially the newer models used with digital cable, transmit a signal back to the cable company in order to track pay-per-view purchases and so forth. If you don't install an amplifier that passes that signal, your set-top box might not work correctly. If you're just going to use a cable-ready TV, then that is not an issue.
I suggest trying the setup without an amplifier first, to see if you get decent reception that way. Use a good-quality RG-6/U cable. If you find you need an amplifier, it will be easy enough to add afterwards.
--
Art Greenberg
artg AT eclipse DOT net
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There are amps for cable frequencies. I tried to use an older "antenna" amp on cable and noticed snow on the mid 30 channels. A friend pointed out that older amps were not able to amplify with one wide frequency amplifier, so they broke it up in VHF and UHF internally in the amp. The mid 30 channels are right between on-air channels 13 and 14. I replaced it with a modern broadband amp (for cable) and it solved the problem. BUT, as someone pointed out, try RG6 without an amp first.
Art Greenberg wrote:

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Art Greenberg ( snipped-for-privacy@none.invalid) said...

It should always be at the beginning, unless it is absolutely not possible.
Good quality cable may result in not even needing an amplifier, but here it the reason why it may be needed and why it shouuld go at the beginning of the run:
The longer the cable run, the weaker the signal will be coming out the other end. If the strength of the signal coming out the other end is too weak, or even borderline, boosting it is likely to bring it up to a useable level to get a good picture.
That would suggest that boosting it at either end is fine, however one must consider noise. The cable, even though shielded, will pick up some noise along its length. Amplyfing the signal at the end of the run will amplify the noise along with the signal. Amplyifing at the beginning will boose the signal you want so that at the end it will be a useable level while leaving the noise unboosted.
--
Calvin Henry-Cotnam
"Never ascribe to malice what can equally be explained by incompetence."
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Have you called the cable company? Seriously, they may do this for cheap. Regulations have changed over the years. I used to have all sorts of cable and boosters in my house as you'd have to pay full price for each set 20+ years ago. Then I found they no longer charged for additional sets and wired my up properly for something like $40. The phone call is cheap and you may be pleasantly surprised.
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I doubt you will need an amplifier. Use good quality RG-6 cable and I bet it will work fine. My cable runs from the pole, then about 100 feet to the house, then splits, then another 100 feet to the shop. I have a great signal in the shop. Greg
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U will need an inline amp. goto www.18inch.com and read up on matter. the reason for the booster is u r already decreasinfg strength by splitting, then running over 100' really saps the output. this site is cool
-- Troweller^nospam^@canada.com
Remove the obvious to reply. Experienced and reliable Concrete Finishing and Synthetic Stucco application in the GTA.

into
powered
it
splits,
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This is Turtle.
like others have said, run good cable and try it. if worst comes to worst buy you a 12db booster from walley world for about $16.00 and put it behind the TV. If you splice into the cable where it comes into your house . You may need nothing to make it look and play good.
TURTLE
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Suggestion: If OP DOES need to use an amplifier, versus high quality coax, as commented on by other posters thought would be to put it at the 'sending' end; i.e. immediately after the splitter. This makes the signals stronger 'before' they go into the extra 180 feet of coax where it could be possible to pick up noise. The OP also questioned how such a 'booster amp'. could be powered. There are amps available that are powered via the coax cable itself from 'downstream'. We have one. In other words the signal being fed to a location where there will be AC for a TV set etc, The power supply provided as part the amp. as bought plugs in there and feeds low voltage back along the coax to power the amp. Make sure the coax is grounded and/or as required by the booster amp installation instructions, which should be UL/CSA approved. Although that grounding can be another whole area of discussion!
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And those $16 walley-world amps have a noise figure that is astronomical. I have had good luck with www.partsexpress.com for decent low-noise amps. 180 feet is not that long a run, Put the amp on the end closest to the source. Use RG-6 or better.
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And those $16 walley-world amps have a noise figure that is astronomical. I have had good luck with www.partsexpress.com for decent low-noise amps. 180 feet is not that long a run, Put the amp on the end closest to the source. Use RG-6 or better.
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ps.com...

figure that is

When will you guys learn to STAY OUT OF WALMART!!!!!!!!!
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Thanks to all who replied ! I tested my 180' foot run of coaxial coming out of a 4 way splitter without an amplifier and I got all clear channels on my workshop TV.
Ray

told
can
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