Buying USED tools

In general, would you consider buying used power tools if the usage is for one project and after that would be rare and occasional use?
By means of used tools I mean something that is previously used and "look" beat up like those people sell on ebay. I don't mean original manufacturer reconditioned tools.
What are some pros and cons? To me if it's cordless I am worried about the battery.
And if you would consider it, what would a reasonable price point be? I have seen a new tool with free shipping on Amazon for $150.00 and someone is offering an equivalent tool that is all beat up with no battery no case no manual and it went to $79 with $30 shipping seems totally out of line to me.
MC
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MiamiCuse wrote:

Depends... :)
Mostly on what the tool is and how much usage...a power pipe threader for a basement bath addition; no...a [something else of your choice]; maybe.
As for _what_, used on eBay for hand power tools is a crap shoot--some are estate sales or the like, others are just don't want/need, others are unloading junk. Hard to tell the difference other than to avoid the large resellers that obviously don't know much about any individual tool's condition.
As for price, whatever you're comfortable with. The example is questionable because by the description it could be two drills but the new one is an offshore while the other is the body of a Milwaukee and the purchaser already has another of the same kind w/ matching batteries and charger, etc., ...
In the end, it's a personal decision...
--
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MiamiCuse wrote:

These brand new tools are good for 2 or 3 projects, and often when on sale, cheaper than used: http://www.harborfrieght.com / You can print out an internet sale item and take that to your local store and they will honor the internet price.
Kevin
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Some tools are built to last forever, so estate sales may be a good source. Don't get the cheap stuff there -- it may have been a contributing factor to the former owner's demise.
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MiamiCuse wrote:

Of course experience is going to vary.
I just bought an ancient (~1986) riding lawnmower (Snapper) from a Craigslist seller for $150.00. My son and I had an enjoyable time cleaning it up and repainting it. We spent an additional $20 for a new battery.
Son-of-a-bitch is a TANK! It goes "Chugga-chugga," works like a charm, and doesn't burn much wood at all.
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You got a woody? Neat!
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Quote: MiamiCuse wrote on Sat, 21 June 2008 10:46 ----------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------
Thats an interesting idea. However I usually used the project as justification to get a new toy (I mean tool) :)
Huah Huah Huah (Tim Taylor Tool Time Grunts)
-- Richard Thoms Founder - Top Service Pros, Inc. Connecting Homeowners and Local Service Professionals http://www.TopServicePros.com
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If your looking for a one time use tool don't rule out pawn shops. there you can even test the tool before paying for it. I buy more tools in a year than most people use in a life time and I'll be happy to tell you to stay away from Harbor freight corded tools. I have bought a few and every one of them I've had to rewire the switches. Ebay is your biggest crap shoot, I've bought a few reconditioned and have been more satisfied than H/F but you will want to stay with name brand. If your in the Midwest however, there is menards. Not the greatest store, but they have an inexpensive brand they sell called Tool shop. Now I know a lot of people will want to disagree with me but I have yet to buy one of these corded tools that didn't surprise the heck out of me as to how well they work. I don't know who really makes them but if you look at the drill presses next to the jet tools they are amazingly similar. Last but not least, stay away from any used cordless tools. Lou
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On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 11:46:46 -0400, "MiamiCuse"

In general, yes; *provided* I could verify that the tool is functional.

Yes, IMO it's totally out of line. I wouldn't consider it.
My price point on such items is 50% or less of the list/delivered price, depending on circumstances. In this case, the "shipping" implies that there is no way for you to verify the functionality of the tool, e.g. you can't plug it in to see how well it works. I personally wouldn't consider it.
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I have often bought used tools esp. at yard sales etc. especially hand tools (that's the only place I can afford to buy Snap-On!) or handheld power tools if they are a quality brand like Milwaukee, Makita, etc. I have no fear of doing this, of course I only buy cheap, e.g. I got a nice Makita drill for $5 and it just needed a new power cord. If it had ended up not worth fixing I would have taken the chuck off of it, thrown the rest away, and not really worried about it.
nate
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For one time project, I'll buy new tools at Harbor Freight - cheap enough. Given enough time those one time projects usually turn out into multiple projects.
I will buy used tools, stationary power tools in particular, as some of the old stuff are better quality and will last forever.
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