burned out bulbs

I have 1 light fixture in my kitchen that continually burns out bulbs. It is a 2 bulb fixture that is above the kitchen sink. I thought the fixture itself could be the trouble so I replaced it with a new one. The problem persists. Whether I use cheap bulbs or high quality expensive bulbs it seems I get little more than a month per bulb and it burns out. Could it be a wiring problem or perhaps a moisture problem? There is no obvious sign of either. Any suggestions?
Thanks Rick
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is
seems
Check your neutral connections in your service. That could help.
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What does it mean to check the neutral connections in the service ??
--James--
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Neutral connects, check voltage.
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Neutral connects, check voltage.
-----------------------------------
Once again, what does this mean ???????? I bet an electrician would readily know waht those four words mean, but the original poster is not likely an electrician. That response provides NO information, whatsover. I presume that you hold valuable information, but are somewhat limited in conveying it to others.
Could you try again ??
Thanks !!!!!!!!!!!
--James--
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James Nipper or AJ the ASS Wake up if you are to stupid to " GET IT "
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James Nipper aka Ara John Movsessian ,,,,,, Need I say more or should I say ???????? So shut the FUCK UP AJ----------- tres hermanos
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Your house has TWO incoming 'hot' wires that between them develop 220VAC,but between each and neutral,develop 120VAC. Neutral is the return path for each 120VAC leg,a loose neutral means your voltage could climb higher depending on how much resistance is in the neutral path from any receptacle/appliance.
Since you have such little experience or knowledge,you should contact an electrician instead of attempting the checks yourself. (It could save your life.)
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik-at-kua.net
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Thanks Jim Yanik for the very clear, concise, professional explanation of "neutral connects, check voltage." This makes sense, and shows the method of checking this voltage at the first point that it comes into the breaker box.
Thanks !!
--James--
----------------------------------------------------
Your house has TWO incoming 'hot' wires that between them develop 220VAC,but between each and neutral,develop 120VAC. Neutral is the return path for each 120VAC leg,a loose neutral means your voltage could climb higher depending on how much resistance is in the neutral path from any receptacle/appliance.
Since you have such little experience or knowledge,you should contact an electrician instead of attempting the checks yourself. (It could save your life.)
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik-at-kua.net
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Neutral connects, check voltage.
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try compact fluorescent
Wayne

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Rick MacDougall wrote:

I had similar problem and I measured the AC voltage coming into the house. It was too high. I called the utility and they put a recording voltmeter on my house. After a several days the recorder disappeared and the problem stopped. Called the utility and they said they had adjusted line voltage down. Good luck, Seamus J. Wilson
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Rick MacDougall wrote:

Before the light burns out, does it exhibit strange behavior? No, I don't mean attitude. :-) Does it ever get dimmer or brighter for a few moments at times?
At my parents previous house, when the microwave was used, the lights would dim in parts of the house, while others would brighten. I researched this, and found it's called a "floating neutral".
In the main circuit panel, the neutral connection is bonded to ground. This helps keep the neutral at 0 volts. Thus the hot is 120 volts. If the neutral is not grounded, it can "move" up or down in voltage.
For example, if it moved to -10 volts relative to the hot connection on the light, it'll receive 130 volts, thus making it brighter, and shorten it's life.
I'm leaving a lot of detail out of why/how this happens because I'm not eloquent enough to explain it in an easy to understand way.
My brother's light suffered the most. Like your kitchen light, he's would burn out after a month or so. I finally convinced Dad to buy him a compact fluorescent light. After 2 - 3 months, it burned out.
So do call to check to make sure it's not a floating neutral. A "Band-Aid" would be to replace the bulb with a 130 volt bulb. These are usually used in rental homes or apartments because they last longer because they are designed for a higher voltage. --Mike
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is
seems
Even the so-called good, expensive bulbs are not as good quality as what you would have bought a few years ago. If the bulbs are fully enclosed, the modern bulbs just can't take the heat. I leave the glass cover off and the bulbs last a long time. I've checked the voltage and it's normal. If I put the glass cover on, the bulbs won't last a month. Someone suggested fluorescent. Good idea. Or, if you don't mind a little less light, replace the 60's with 40's.
Bob
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Had a pair of small pot lights in my kitchen, they took very small pricey reflector bulbs with a candelabra base. The bulbs wouldn't last longer than 2 to 3 months, used up the box and bought another box, same story. When that box was used up, bought another box of the bulbs. Now they are still burning after 3 or 4 years, I cannot remember exactly. It seems that either some manufacturers or some batches are junk and others are exceptionally good. Price doesn't seem to indicate quality in all cases.
Some full sized reflector bulbs in the kitchen are the original bulbs installed in 1987 and are still going strong with daily use.

is
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I checked voltage throughout the house and found consitent 123 volts. All grounds good too. I didn't check the 220. Bulbs are in a trak light type fixture and so are well ventilated and not likely to overheat. 2 other fixtures in kitchen are on same breaker but separate switches and show no sign of the problem. I have considered trying compact flourescent but thought i'd see what the problem might be first.
Thanks for the response everyone. any more thoughts are welcome
Rick
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Rick MacDougall wrote:

trying
You did good. Since the voltages were constant and within norms, I think you have almost ruled that problem out.
It is possible that you may be getting spikes from time to time due to internal or external problems, but it seems not likely. Most internal sources would have shown up with your voltage check and most external sources would be blasting other lamps as well.
Let's go to plan B. Is there anything that could be causing vibration of the fixture? Something in the room above, a exhaust fan close by, a pipe close by...? Also remove one of the lamps. Take a close look at the center contacts on both the lamp and the fixture. Do they look clean and bright?
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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On Sun, 29 Aug 2004 09:52:59 -0700, "Rick MacDougall"

What is above the lights? Since your voltage looks ok vibration is the next big killer of bulbs. If you have a two story house with the kids room above the kitchen you bulb life will be drastically shorter. Just an idea for ya.
Steve B.
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Lights are on upper floor above kitchen sink and near a window. There is an over the range microwave with built in exhaust fan nearby but really not much vibration to speak of.. It is however arguably the busiest area of the house. Maybe that's all it is. I have a neighbour who's an electrician so i'll offer him a beer to check the neutral in the service panel for me. if that checks out, I'll try the compact flourescents. I've lived here for 8 years and this has been an issue since day 1. Does that make me patient or procrastinating?
Thanks again everyone : )
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Rick:
RM> I have 1 light fixture in my kitchen that continually burns out bulbs. It iRM> a 2 bulb fixture that is above the kitchen sink. I thought the fixture RM> itself could be the trouble so I replaced it with a new one. The problem RM> persists. Whether I use cheap bulbs or high quality expensive bulbs it seemRM> I get little more than a month per bulb and it burns out. Could it be a RM> wiring problem or perhaps a moisture problem? There is no obvious sign of RM> either. Any suggestions?
Do the bulbs seem to be brighter or dimmer than they should be normally? The problem could be a loose neutral in the service panel. Might be a good idea to have an electrican check out as you're dealing with the buss bars which are live (hundred amps or so).
Another possibility is the fixture is vibrating -- are stairs nearby which could cause step/stomping to be transmitted? Use of bulbs made for garage door openers should fix the problem.
- barry.martinATthesafebbs.zeppole.com
* Is there such a thing as a black donut hole?
--
RoseReader 2.52 P003186
The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA 563-359-1971
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