Building Collapse....

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A more complete set of photos of this June's Shanghai building collapse and diagrams explaining what happened and why.
http://home.comcast.net/~jwisnia18/bldg_fall /
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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Man, those Chinese are something! I've heard of tilt-up construction, but never tilting up the entire building after it's been completed! What will they think of next...
R
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Those pilings look awfully flimsy, no wonder they snapped off, there was hardly any re-rods and they were just hollow tubes, not much more than a concrete drain pipe.
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Think it has Chinese Drywall?
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jeff_wisnia wrote:

Holy mackerel, I don't feel so bad about my shoddy workmanship now!
Jon
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Amazing that the structure remained as intact as it did. The foundation was weak, but the building sure wasn't. Lots of the windowpanes weren't even broken. It looked so undamaged that I thought, after seeing just the first photo, that it was a fake. Obviously not.
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote:

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Sorry. I meant to agree with Robert, but my computer hiccupped. So, I guess I'll re-iterate (again) that it's amazing the building didn't crumble more.
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Sorry. I meant to agree with Robert, but my computer hiccupped. So, I guess I'll re-iterate (again) that it's amazing the building didn't crumble more.
I suspect that the reason it gives that appearance is because the buildings collapse was cushioned a bit in the soft mud, allowing the stresses to snap things sequentially as it fell rather than an explosion where the energy is applied all at once.
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
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buildings
snap
is
Yeah but . . . (-: Many of the windows didn't even break. That's just bizarre. I wonder what the "rate of descent" was. I guess if it tipped over gradually enough there wasn't a big slam at the end, but still, it's a pretty amazing site. Or sight. Or even cite. Thanks for posting that, Jeff.
I guess I am used to seeing collapsed buildings in the aftermath of earthquakes where the buildings fall because they are shaken apart. The Shanghai building didn't have to endure any pre-collapse shaking and I am betting the ground gave way slowly and the pilings appear to have bent before they broke, asborbing both time and energy and moderating the forces on the building. Still, what a ride that must have been. Sounds like a project for Disney World. Here are some random EQ photos, FWIW:
http://images.google.com/images?q=japanese+earthquakes
-- Bobby G.
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.
re: "I guess if it tipped over gradually enough there wasn't a big slam at the end..."
Imagine being in the building at the time and feeling it slowly lean over. If it went over slow enough, you could just walk across the floor and step onto the wall, remaining upright the entire time.
As long as you could avoid the objects sliding across the floor with you, and the pictures and stuff falling from the opposite wall, it looks like you could have walked away from this type of collapse relatively unharmed.
Of course, getting to the door that was now on the ceiling could be tricky!
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...
Imagine walking thru that building TODAY.
it could be a tourist attraction:)
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energy
over
am
forces
<Imagine walking thru that building TODAY.
it could be a tourist attraction:)>
I remember driving across the Verazzano Narrows Bridge in NYC during a very windy blizzard. I think that's the most scared I've every been. The bridge deck was icing over, tractor-trailers were rocking from side to side from the high wind and the bridge deck was shaking very hard.
Everbody in their cars had the hunkered down look you see on pictures of Civil War soldiers charging into a storm of bullets. Not one smile, hands clenched to the wheel, passengers all ashen-faced with fear. All I could think about was that famous film of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge breaking up in high winds. I was driving an Oldsmobile F-85 with rear wheel drive (I don't think very many cars had FrontWD back then) and it was fishtailing all over the road. The only way to drive was to make sure you had slow, but steady forward motion. If you stopped, you were going to spin on start up.
This was back when the VN bridge first opened, about 1964 or so, and there had not been a storm that bad so I figured I was a goner. What I worried about was whether I had clean underwear on and whether God would mind that I suddenly couldn't remember the words to the Lord's Prayer. Yes, the mind works in really weird ways. So I kind sort of imagine what a ride like that feels like. Sort of. (-: I'll bet, by some standards, the building would be less scary because it was over in seconds. My bridge ordeal took about an hour to cross a bridge that normally took 4 minutes.
-- Bobby G.
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over
forces
re: "I guess if it tipped over gradually enough there wasn't a big slam at the end..."
<<Imagine being in the building at the time and feeling it slowly lean over. If it went over slow enough, you could just walk across the floor and step onto the wall, remaining upright the entire time.
As long as you could avoid the objects sliding across the floor with you, and the pictures and stuff falling from the opposite wall, it looks like you could have walked away from this type of collapse relatively unharmed.
Of course, getting to the door that was now on the ceiling could be tricky!>>
I thought about what a ride that must have been. It's a natural for Disney. (-:
-- Bobby G.
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On Fri, 06 Nov 2009 15:02:17 -0500, jeff_wisnia

This is actually a better arrangement, because it puts more people on the ground floor, and doesn't rely so much on elevators.
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wrote:

If that had happened in the US with all the homeless people we now have, you can be sure that if it wasn't demolished quickly, it would soon be occupied, even in the horizontal state.
-- Bobby G.
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And to think, it was undoubtedly built using Chinese dry wall.
Charlie
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CSBDS Chinesee Sick Building Drywall Sympton, corrosive Drywall fumes corroded the rebar. Was it even attatched to the foundation? The break looks to clean.
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jeff_wisnia wrote:

I'm glad I don't live there, I'd never remember which apartment is mine, they all look alike, even the ones that are different look very similar. Well if the flat one was my building I suppose I could pick it out of the rest.
What is with the hollow pilings? They really look weak with a little bit of steel wire mesh in them. Hollow? Would it have happened if it were steel I beams encased in concrete?
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Tony wrote:

I'd guess they were a contractor cutting corners if I had to guess...if those hollow ones were really actual pilings and not drain conduits or somesuch. There also appear solid pourings as well. W/O design documents are to say what might have been intended.
Certainly the lack of any steel of consequence meant there was absolutely no tensile strength in the design to speak of.
Looks to me like what happened was that the lateral force from the loading and wet soil conditions caused the whole thing to tilt and at the critical point the tension load was too much and they fractured.
As to the question regarding steel, undoubtedly would not have broken cleanly; what would have been total result would have depended on depth of pilings (moment arm to resist rotation) and actual soil conditions and, of course, whether any steel was of sufficient size/strength to withstand the moment arm itself of the load caused by the initial tilt.
One would wonder about the long-term stability of the rest against extraordinary high wind, particularly if the supposition there might be inferior work as compared to design in play were to be true...
It really is hard to fathom there would be no steel reinforcement in the design...
--
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