Bringing pool circuits up to code

I've had problems with the pump circuit at my pool. The electrician fixed that by bypassing some other stuff up there and says he won't do any more unless I agree to let him bring the old wiring up to code. From what I've seen of what the prior electrician did, he's right. But I'm not sure everything he wants to do is necessary: 1) Bonding filter pump and heater to "the bonding bar in the electrical equipment trough". Sounds good to me, but I don;'t think we have a bonding bar or a trough. 2) Supply and install a mounting board for the electrical equipment. Needed? At the moment, it's all mounted to a structural element of the pump house. 3) Install a twist-lock receptacle with in-use cover and a twist- lock cord and plug for the pump? At the moment, the motor is hard- wired to a switch. It is only disconnected when service is required.
Why are these items needed? The rest of his suggestions all make obvious sense, so I have not listed them.
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Everything metal, that's associated with the pool, must be bonded together. Whatever "bonding bar" he's talking about, is probably some location where other bonding conductors come together. It's a safety thing

If it's structurally sound, it should be fine. If it's rotting, then replace it.

It's a pia to get those wires in and out of a pump. I don't know that I'd go for it now, but if you need to replace the pump, I would certainly wire it to a twist lok

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Per code all the metal around the pool and pool equipment has to be bonded together. That includes metal pool ladders, pumps, heaters, switch boxes, etc. Not sure what he means by the bonding bar in the electrical eqpt trough, but it sounds like he's proposing to tie the bonded parts to some bonding point already there. Normally the pool ladder sockets and the concrete surrounding the pool are bonded together with a wire that then runs over to the pool eqpt. Then the heater, pumps, etc are tied to it.

Depends on how whatever eqpt he's talking about is mounted now. If it's securely fastened, then from what you've said, I don't see the issue. If it's mounted half-assed, not secure, no place to clamp wires, conduit, etc, then putting it on a secure mounting is appropriate.

Having it hard wired is how most of the ones I've seen are done. There is no code reqt for a cord and plug, so I'd say that's unnecessary and a waste of money.

Did he include a GFCI for the pump? That is now required, as of 2008 NEC, I believe. Existing pumps are grandfathered, but any time you're doing an improvement to the pump circuit it would be required. And for the extra safety of having all the pool eqpt on a GFCI I think it's well worth doing.
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On Thu, 19 May 2011 15:48:12 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

It is probably how he is providing the required disconnect.
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On May 19, 7:20 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

He said it's currently wired to a switch. Provided the switch is within direct view from the pump and only a short distance away, doesn't that meet the reqt for a disconnect? If the switch isn't within view of the pump and close by, then I agree the plug could be a way to meet that reqt.
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On Thu, 19 May 2011 16:43:06 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

If it is within sight you are right.. I was just trying to rationalize the suggestion.
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wrote:

The switch is about a foot from the pump and within direct view. But there is a second switch up at the pool deck, within earshot but not eyeshot of the pump.
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I'd say depends on how the two switches are wired. If they are in series, then the switch by the pump can serve as the disconnect. If they are in parallel and either one can turn on the pump, then the pump needs another disconnect means which could be the proposed plug. Or the breaker panel could serve as the disconnect if it's lockable.
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wrote:

The pool ladder is about 15 or 20 feet from the pump -- does it still need to be bonded?
This circuit has a GFCI at the circuit breaker box inside the house.
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wrote:

The pool ladder is about 15 or 20 feet from the pump -- does it still need to be bonded?
EVERYTHING, metal that's associated with the pool must be bonded. The metal sockets that the ladder sit in would (should) have been connected to a bonding conductor when the pool was built
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Here's a diagram that shows how pool bonding should be done.
http://www.erico.com/public/library/fep/LT1242.pdf
This is inline with current code. Depending when the pool was installed, the reqts may have been more lenient and what is there is grandfathered as long as it met the code then and you aren't changing/improving that part of the pool.
Bonding is important. The basic idea is that you want everything that's conductive around the pool to be connected togther so that it's at the same potential. That way if you're the path between any of those things, there is no opportunity for current to flow through you. In particular, note that the concrete pool deck has a bonding conductor in it too. That way the concrete you're standing on with wet feet is at the same potential as the pool ladder, fence, conduits, etc.
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wrote:

The pool was here and showing signs of age when I moved in 17 years ago, but goes back no further than 1958, when the house was built. I don't know if there's a bonding conductor in the concrete. The piping between the pump and the pool is all plastic, most of it recent. The pool latter is held by metal cups mounted in the concrete. Those were moved a foot or so last year, so if they were grounded to a conductor in the concrete, they probably no longer are.
Near as I can tell, the secondary motor switch, up on the pool deck, is in series with the original.
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Dont know what the current setup is so impossible to guess.. Everything should be bonded together but there is more than one way to skin a cat. Having everything clearly connected to a bonding bar is great because whoever is working on it doesnt have to guess if this equipment is safe to work on or not.... the ground connections will be clearly visible The twist lock connection shouldnt be needed unless there is not a disconnect present On mine the disconnect is the GFCI breaker.and it is hardwired in. Next time I change a motor it will probably get a plug installed.....hardwiring it where there is little room to work is a PITA.
Jimmie
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Sounds like he wants to clean up your pool electrical so that he doesn't have to return to deal with it peice meal. Is he possibly a little anal about how nice it really needs to be? Maybe. But would you rather have that or just let some hack jury rig things from time to time to keep it working? I do most of my own work but it sounds a lot like he wants to do what I would probably do myself if I had a pool.
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