bought an old house (90 years old)

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water coming form the basement and the basement need for sure waterproofing treatment. the house sold as is (power sale) and i am not sure if the plumming working fine because i have not moved yet (i live in toronto). i have found that the attic need insulation as well, crapet upstair need to be changed, the the roofing shanquel need to be replace soo. The front of the house is not bring but they made it look like it is bring (they put something look like brong but it is very thin, i do not know the name). and some other minor stuff need to be done inside the house like painting, windows cleaning or replacing etc.
Could you please advise me what I should do first (priority wise). I do not want to do something first and then do the next thing and then find that I have to undo what I did first to finsh the second task.
Thanks a lot
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On 01/15/2011 07:34 PM, leza wang wrote:

if you're serious...
roof and dampness in basement are 1st priorities. everything else is secondary. make the thing weathertight first.
nate
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replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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?

Agree. Next is plumbing and electrical. You want to be safe; if unsafe correct, if safe but you want better services, skip and go to the next step, then come back at your convenience. . Next is check out the heat and insulation. Biggest savings and fastest payback is insulating.
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wrote:

I hope you got it real cheap. Is it in Toronto? or Hamilton? - how far out?
If the house is insul-brick (looks like brick but made out of wood-fibre type crap with stone finish like shingles) no Canadian insurance company will insure it. MANY houses of that age were sided with insul-brick.
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On Jan 16, 4:33 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

is that because of asbestos in siding?
does the home have any knob and tube wiring.
i looked at a home nearby, owener was looking for volunteers to help rebuild. it was near a closed mine, and along the railroad tracks.
It must of been built as people picked up stuff that fell off trains.
A hodgepoge of misc material using some railroad track as framing. the track was worn.
felt bad for the guy his wife tired of the mess and moved out taking the kids.
will have to drive by and see what he did.
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On 1/16/2011 5:18 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Chuckle. At estate sales in older blue-collar parts of town here, more than once I have looked up at the center beam in the basement, and realized it was an upside-down stick of railroad track. Grand Trunk used to have a pretty big repair shop here, back before CN absorbed them into the parent company.
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aem sends...

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aemeijers wrote:

Hmmm, 2011 minus 90 goes back to 1921. Isn't that the time resources were scarce? It was B4 I was born.
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What is bring and brong?
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sorry for my spelling mistake. i meant brick
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Please repost with clearer spelling, there were so many words that didn't make sense that it was impossible to figure out what were your problems.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Hmmm, Hired a house inspector? Ican cost a lot of money or not so much of it depending on the over all condition of the house. If water in the basement, you have to ind to cause and apply proper remedy just water proofing can mean nothing much. Your house keeping lesson number one is beginning
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Do all the outside stuff first, new roof, point & check chimney, the fake brick may be insulbrick. best to reside home and replace windows or repair. and check condition of vents thru roof. Then worry about wet basement.
Secure the outdoors first before doing anything inside. Cause outdoor troubles like roof leaks can ruin new indoor stuff fast
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thanks but i already bought the house, it was low price that is why i did not hire inspector. what the inspector would have told me? there is a crak in the basment?! i knew that so why i pay for something i can see it and know how much will cost me. we heard many stories home owners hired inspectors but they miss this or that
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Fix the roof first. Is the crack in the basement an outside or inside wall? What is a roofing shanquel? You said a crack in the basement drywall, but drywall is not normally on an outside basement wall.
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On 1/15/2011 7:33 PM hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net spake thus:

C'mon, man, can't you fill in the blanks? I think "shingle" would fit nicely here.
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Comment on quaint Usenet customs, from Usenet:

To me, the *plonk...* reminds me of the old man at the public hearing
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Shingle of course.
I betcha she does better writing english than you would her native language.
Jeff
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(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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thanks but i already bought the house, it was low price that is why i did not hire inspector. what the inspector would have told me? there is a crak in the basment?! i knew that so why i pay for something i can see it and know how much will cost me. we heard many stories home owners hired inspectors but they miss this or that
Leza
After shopping for a qualified inspector that may not be a bad choice for you. It would allow you to get some advice from someone who is not trying to sell you anything. They can identify most of the problems with the home and give you some indication of the best order to do the work. Check around and find out who is the most honest best educated one in your area. You may be able to get a nice discount since they will have little risk in this friendly inspection.
The things that you, a new homeowner think most important may be the least important. I have seen people spend money on new paint, carpet, cabinets and a lot of interior stuff while the roof over their heads was slowly rotting away.
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Colbyt
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wrote:

sorry for that. i am reposting it here again. thanks == Hi I just bought as is home and I noticed that there is water leakage in the basement. There is like 5 inch crack in the drywall (wet). The basement needs for sure waterproofing treatment. The house sold as is (power sale) and i am not sure if the pluming working fine because i have not moved yet (i live in Toronto, Ontario). I also have found the following:
1) The attic need insulation as well. 2) The carpet upstairs needs to be changed 3) The roofing shingle needs to be replaced so. 4) The front of the house is not bring but they made it look like it is brick wall (they put something to make it look like brick but it is very thin tiny stuff connected by cement, i do not know the name). 5) Some other of minor stuff need to be done inside the house like painting, windows cleaning or replacing etc. Could you please advise me what I should do first (priority wise). I do not want to do something first and then do the next thing and then find that I have to undo what I did first to finish the second task.
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On Sat, 15 Jan 2011 19:20:42 -0800 (PST), leza wang

I can't remember what they used for foundation walls 90 years ago, but drywall is sheet-rock or fibre board or gypsum sandwiched between paper. It's definitly not the cinderblock or brick wall that separates your basement from the dirt outside. Unless the drywall dries out soon, you probalby have to rip it out to find the real wall underneath. Or at least make a hole in it to look in and start planning what to do next.

In your situation, where I assume you expect to spend quite a bit to waterprrof the basement for many years to come, this might not be helpful, but waterproof paint, such as by UGL, can do an incredible amount, considering it's only paint, takes little time and little money, to waterproof a basement. You should also check downspouts to see that the rain water is directed away from the house, and earth "gradiing". I had a little dip right next to my wall, where the downspout water washed away some dirt, the water pooled there and went down and seeped into my cinderblock foundation.
A friend had a sump and a sumppump, but the output hose only went 6 inches from her house, so as soon as her pump pumped the water out, it came right back.
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On 1/15/2011 7:34 PM, leza wang wrote:

First priority- condition of foundation, aside from the moisture problem. No point fixing anything else if the foundation CAN'T be realistically fixed. If previous owner walked away, there may be a good reason. Second priority- roof. Is it currently leaking, or is it just going to need a tearoff and replacement 'soon' ? (On a 90 year old house, unless it has had a full replacement in last 20 years, you want it ALL off, so they can check the roof structure and repair as needed.) Note that basement moisture problems are often related to roof and gutter problems- fixing what is on top can often help what is down below. Third priority- fix basement moisture problem. No point bringing new material inside a damp house. It may be expensive, it may be as simple as fixing gutters and repairing basement window wells, and regrading the yard a little. Yards get taller over time, and can sometimes develop low spots near foundation where water collects and leaks in. Anybody 'in the business' can quickly eyeball the situation and tell you likely places to look. If the first words out of their mouth are 'interior french drains', throw them out. While sometimes a (last resort) solution, there are usually much cheaper cures.
These first 3 items are close in priority- everything else can be done as budget allows, other than maybe any electric and plumbing issues needed to make the place safe/legal to live in. You can remove the skanky carpets and such whenever it is convenient. If house is damp, they probably reek. I'd live with bare floors till all the other work is done.
If you are not in the immediate area to supervise repair work until you can move, recommend hiring a good general contractor to assist you. Even if you are in the area, if you have never done any of this and don't have the skills, bring a pro in early to inspect, and develop a list of what needs to be done in what order. You want somebody like that Mike Holmes guy from TV, that won't BS you. Any good contractor with rehab experience understands things need to be done in phases sometimes.
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