Bluestone patio base question

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For my new addition, I am planning on installing a bluestone patio. To avoid a 3 - 4 step drop to the patio from my family room, the GC wants to raise the patio area. Now, I know that soil should be at least 6 inches away from any wood material (clapboard siding, sheathing, etc..) of a home, but my GC told me since the material uses to raise the grade will be gravel and stone dust, so, there is no need to worry about covering properly flashed plywood sheathing with this patio base material since it will not retain water. Is he shitting me or what?
thxs
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Purchased my "new construction" model home in 97...wasn't till much later that I learned about siding touching such areas. The house already had interior paint, carpeting etc so no choices or changes did I have options for. When my daughter purchased her new construction home I asked the builder about the siding touching the concrete entrance way. His reply is that they do it all the time and it passes inspection. ? ????
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it would depend on your climate, drainage, the local building codes, the construction of the home, type of foundation, ability to shed the water and/or snow and local insect concerns. size and type of construction of patios and additions are often limited by fire concerns and property boundaries.
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There should be an impenetrable barrier between the two. Contractors go in and out of business all the time, and if it isn't done right, you'll be stuck paying for major repairs. Get a couple of other opinions.

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don't know where you are located but around here you cannot have any wood in contact with the ground because of termite and carpenter ants.
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I am not burying the house wood 2' deep. The gravel/stone dust base will come up to the side of the exposed poured concrete foundation wall, and about 8 - 12 inches on to the wood that makes up the house (sill plate which is pressure treated, rim joist and the plywood sheathing. All the wood will be flashed with copper. The house has vinyl siding.

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ground. I'm not sure where you are located but in these parts, termites will jump all over that situation. I'm in NM and it's dry as a bone however the ground still retains moisture. It shouldn't cost too much to ensure a moisture barrier is in place (30# felt might work just fine) to give a bit of insurance against rot and insects. Cheers, cc
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I forgot to mention that all wood surfaces would be covered with 30# felt before the flashing is tacked on.

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Yes, he's wrong. You generally do not want to put wood underground without an effective moisture barrier. If he can't do a simple thing like this right how well do you think the rest of the job would be? Get another contractor, fast.
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All, More facts to clarify my original post:
1) House sits on a poured cement foundation wall. 2) The desire is to have a single step out to a bluestone patio, instead of a 3 -4 step, from the family room.
3) The idea is to raise the patio, any wood material (sill plate, rim joist, plywood sheathing) that comes in contact with the patio base, will be prepped with 30 # felt, then flashed with copper.
4) The base of the patio wil consist of trap rock and stone dust.
5) The patio will be pitched away from the foundation. 6) The house is sided with vinyl.

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No way I'd do that to my house.
If you really want to come up that high, put in a deck, not a patio.
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Dan, Can you elaborate on why you would not do this? I still have the option of building stairs down to the patio, but I have to make my decsions this week.
thxs

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Because you are putting wood underground. It will get bug infested and rot. Felt paper and copper aren't going to help. It will get damp in there and never dry out.
I don't understand why you would do that. Decks go above grade, patios are installed on grade.

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Dan, This is what I had in mind ..
http://www.keepmedia.com/pubs/FamilyHandyman/1999/06/01/645979/?extID 047&data=raised_patio

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Notice, in your link, the patio fill never contacts the house wood. It is against the house foundation. This is OK. Never bury wood you are just creating a nice moist meal for bugs. All your flashing etc will just prolong the inevitable. Nice looking patio, by the way.
writes:

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Yep, I agree it looks nice.
If the wood could be removed and replaced with stone or cement, I don't think there would be a problem.
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You should also have the option of building a free-standing patio about 11" from the house, and bridging the gap with a 2x12, metal grill, or deck-plate.

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Goedjn wrote:

That's a dead cat space if there ever was one. I like the idea of the bridge, though - I'd just make it bigger so it would work into the design and you could landscape in the space.
R
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wrote:

Yes, if you use the short-gap method, you need to be able to take out the bridging material to clean out the gap. I'll admit I like the idea of a nice single-arch walking bridge to an "island" patio, though.
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Sir Topham Hatt wrote:

If the question is, is he lying to you, no way to tell from here. He may believe what he's telling you, but it isn't good advice nor construction.
In a subsequent post you metioned the wood-framed part would only be about 12" below the surface of the patio. Code around here requires wood framing to be 8" above grade, unless it's treated wood. If you wish have the patio come right up to the house you will need to design a better detail than 30# felt and some flashing.
The stone dust may prevent the concealed area from becoming a bathtub, but it will get wet and hold moisture longer than if it was free to dry in the air. Termites and such love that environment.
Brush-on waterproofing with embedded mesh over the sheathing/foundation joint, or a membrane, will be required to extend down onto the foundation. You may also want to look into a drainage plane against the building. You may have seen those dimpled plastic sheets with geofabric attached, or something similar.
If you want to do it right you need to approach it as waterproofing the foundation. Anything else and you, and your GC, are kidding yourselves. It's a small area, and already above grade, so it's no big deal.
R
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