Blocking rat holes

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com writes:

I disagree.
We have a declawed indoor cat. We had a hole in the dryer hose and had a chipmunk, mouse, mole, and another mouse get in before we found the entry place.
I dispatched one of the mice with a hammer. (It was the first thing I saw.)
Other than that one, our indoor cat was right on the case. As soon as the rodent was in the house we could tell something was up. The cat was all attentive and watching for the rodent to get into open space. None of them lasted more than a few hours.
If you have rodents in the walls, the situation might be different but if they're just getting in the house, you don't need traps the cat will get them.
I'm sure our old cat looks back to that time as her glory years. She's 16 now and still going strong but it's been at least 10 years since her last kill. Poor kitty.
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On Sat, 17 Nov 2007 01:18:15 GMT, Dan Espen

That is exactly the point. He specifically said "small rat". That is usually a roof rat and they tend to live in your attic, only coming into the house to eat. You seldom even know they are there unless you happen too be up at 3 AM and you are sitting in the dark waiting for one. Just remember the cat only kills to feed his hunting instinct and that instinct tells him not to kill therm all. The rat has a lot more to lose. The cat loses a meal, the rat loses his life. I'm sure Bub will tell us about Towser and all the rats he killed but it is clear he never did much to stem the rat problem or he would have run out of rats.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I'd go ahead and repair the opening just in case there are others that might have access to the inside of the home. Place a secured trap in front of the plugged area just in case there are any already inside the structure. You probably can find the outside entry point that will need to be closed when you feel that the problem has been stopped.
Lar
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Rodents HATE steel wool. Once they encounter it, they will never try to get through that spot again.
Finding how they got in can vary from nearly impossible to forget it. This is the time of year when they are looking for a warm place to spend the winter. Your biggest problem is that with a cat in the picture, you can't set out poison. On the other hand, your cat's presence will be a pretty effective deterrent. Also make very sure that there is NOTHING for them to eat. That includes dirty dishes left overnight on the counter.
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mice or roaches!! yuck!
Jim
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If the rats are free to come and go and they find plenty to eat outside they may happily live in the attic for years without you seeing them. Once they do figure out there is food downstairs they will lay down a trail for all their buddies. Roof rats leave a dark trail anywhere they go a lot. That was what the AC guy pointed out to me when I figured out they were there ... along with the chewed up ductwork that brought the AC guy out there in the first place.
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wrote:

puleeezeeeee!!! They come inside to get warm, dummy.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

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Other than gopher guts, which are out of stock frequently at my store, steel wool is the most suggested thing by people who know these things. Really cheap and easy to use.
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

For interior holes only though...if it is used for exterior openings it can oxidize and leave a rust stain down the side of the wall.
Lar
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Lar wrote:

Actually, you can get copper wool, which works the same and won't rust.
Northe
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Daniel Prince wrote:

Do nothing other than leaving the cabinet and pantry doors ajar.
Consider Towser (who you can Google) who, for 23 years was the mouser-in-chief at the Glennturrent Distillery in Scotland. During her tenure, she caught 28,989 mice, quite a few rats, and an occassional rabbit.
Praise your kitty; she's earning her keep.
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I've had good luck with a blob of great stuff mixed with pea gravel trowelled into the hole AT least it works with chipmunk holes

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On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 14:43:43 -0800, Daniel Prince

I have found traps inefective.
Check out the pic for the reason. :)
http://i7.tinypic.com/2ex6kah.jpg
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Rat traps and rodent poison are my favorites. But if you go that route, get your cat out of the house.
I caught one mouse about 12 years ago and none since. I attribute it to sprinkling ground Habenaro peppers in the doorways. The stuff also stops insects.
We acquire a house cat 6 years ago and she has yet to find a mouse - plus she stays away from the doorways after sprinkling.
BTW: Cats are not animals. They are family. Unlike children who want to argue with you, cats just ignore you.
Dick
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Daniel Prince wrote:

Rat is very serious problem.
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I found a web site that said that adult mice have 3-4 inch bodies and 3-4 inch tails. This rodent had a 5 inch body and a 6 inch tail. -- I don't understand why they make gourmet cat foods. I have known many cats in my life and none of them were gourmets. They were all gourmands!
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On Mon, 19 Nov 2007 18:38:20 -0800, Daniel Prince

How about a foraging roof rat? http://ag.arizona.edu/urbanipm/rodents/roofrat.pdf
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