Blocking rat holes

Page 2 of 3  
observer wrote:

Hmmm...the slums of Highland Park. Over 80% of my work is in the towns of Highland Park and University Park (5 miles north of downtown Dallas)where both towns break the top 20 list for most wealthiest cities in the US. Roof rats and outdoor roaches are dealt with on a daily basis for me out there. Not so much sanitation issues, but the manicured landscapes in these 60 plus year old neighborhoods are the perfect environment for them.
Lar
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lar wrote:

Same in Florida. 12 mos. growing season guarantees palm berries and citrus are available. Neatest thing about roof rats was seeing one run to the bottom end of a downspout and hear the critter climb up the inside. I had heard noises by the downspout before, but thought that must be the "down" elevator and trees the "up" elevator :o)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"observer" wrote

Wee bit overboard there. In some areas, mice are endemic. Folks learn to deal with them without removing the cat (who's mere presence reduces the number trying to get in and this one is a mouser so even better than that).
Daniel, set a few traps where the cat cant get at them, with peanut butter. Also, an odd but very useful one for the smaller levcel problem (non-breadbasket wheatlands of USA) is a plastic owl on a string so it swings in the breeze, strategically placed <g>. Excellent interior devices you plug into the wall that emit a high pitched sound and irritate the $E@#$#@ out of mice. Careful, they have to be pitched to not also drive the cat insane <g>.
Yes, do seal all holes you can find outside. Once you do that, interior ones arent but a cosmetic issue. You can seal them fast with just a fine mesh metal screen. They will eat through plastic ones but not metal ones.
Likely entry points? Attached garage and a door to the kitchen or other part of house with an 1/2 inch 'gap' covered by mere plastic 'bottom skirt'. Mice can move that out of the way and get through fine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Cshenk wrote:

Got it, mice are one thing but you'll note this thread started with some guy getting rats in his house - big difference between those two.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"observer" wrote ..

True, I took it as a mis-name though since the cat won (grin).
Lots of people who've never seen a real rat, think mice are the same. I got the heebeejeebee's scared outa me in Vladivostok Russia at night once by the real thing. I swear that sucker was over a foot long not counting the tail! There's this underground walkway you go through to get to the main part of town from the ship piers and that was where I saw it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

There are a couple of basic species of rats and probably hundreds of sub species. The roof rat that we see most in Florida is smaller than a small squirrel without the bushy tail. The roof rat has a tail longer than the body. I doubt there is really much difference in any practical sense. A squirrel is just a rat with a publicist. You don't want either of them living in your house. They are really "outside" animals that stray inside looking for a home. The nasty rats are the European "Norway" rats. They are the ones that get bigger than a cat and tend to live more where the people are. That is your typical city rat. The problem with all rats is how fast they can make baby rats, usually only limited by the food supply. They can eat damn near anything so that is tough to control. Most ornamental trees and shrubs produce a seed or fruit they will eat. Of course a trash can is a rat buffet. The raccoons and dogs open the can and scatter the trash around, the rats come and clean up the scraps.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cool! I was reading the other's ntes on the roof rats. I'm not familiar with them so it was interesting, especially the post on the one running up the gutter.

Snicker, we got lots of squirrels here. Any openings to the attic here have to be braced inside with heavy metal screeing to keep them out.

Thats what I've seen. On ships, we have rat guards on the lines to keep them from running up. Once a ship gets an infestation, it's horridly hard to get rid of them. Roaches too are really hard.
Sounds like you might be an exterminator so know more than most of us would about such!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Lars is our exterminator. I just took a lot of time to study my enemy. The more you know about pests, the easier it is to control them. You will never eliminate rats, the trick is just to reduce the number and keep them outside. NEVER kill a snake! They eat more rats in your yard than a cat and they don't dig up your flower beds..
BTW I think boric acid is probably the best roach preventer. If they would liberally dust the floor under cabinets in the kitchen before they set them I think your bug problem would be vastly reduced. The same for the stud cavities. Boric acid is not really that toxic to people but you should still keep it sequestered.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Well that would be a yes and no answer with that. If boric acid would be properly applied it can be a good product, but if it is heavily applied it is just a repellent causing insects to bypass where the BA is placed and just show up in places where the dust in not. If it is being used in cabinets because the thought of it being safer than the store bought insecticides BA dust/powder will be 30 to 150 times more toxic than any of the insecticides sold for home use or put out by an exterminator along with no unsightly dust to see.
Lar
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lar wrote:

Boric acid is used intrnally and for eye wash. Sure it's toxic?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Norminn wrote:

There is a difference in of toxicity of BA dust sprinkled about for insect control that is at 97%-100% strength and products that just contain a small percentage of BA in there mixtures. When used in eye washes it is at a very low concentration...check the label of a lot of commercial eye washes and you will even see Hydrochloric Acid on the label. :) You might be thinking of Diatamaceous Earth that is fed to cattle to help with worms that is also put out for insects as is BA. It was used a lot at the turn of the 20th century as an antiseptic wash for surgery but was stopped. http://tinyurl.com/yqr68y
Lar
http://tinyurl.com/yqr68y
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A book from 1899 to prove what? Show me something that proves BA is 30-150 times more toxic than ANY pesticide? Perhaps if I sit down and eat spoonfuls straight from the container. I agree with your point about dusting to keep roaches away....They can find the house even if you build mounds with BA, and they can always follow you home from the grocery store :o)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Norminn wrote:

point out at one time it was used internally, but I think that practice is long gone.
we'll try this way and any insecticide can be broke down this way... easy enough to find the LD50 of different chemicals on the web, the lower the number the more toxic the substance. I'll use cypermethrin because I know where to find an example of the ld50 of finished product. Cypermethrin is one of the older pyrethroids used in pest control, the newer generation pyrethroids are even more "non insect" friendly at use rates. The ld50 of BA is around 2700mg/kg which is mild and cypermethrin is 250mg/kg which means cypermethrin molecule is over 10 times more toxic than the BA molecule...bad. But cypermethrin is not the insecticide, it is just an active ingredient in the insecticide which I use it at from .1% down to .025%. If you go to the makers site for the Consumers Product Information, http://tinyurl.com/yreu2r ,it shows the cypermethrin product at .6% rate has a ld50 of greater than 20,000mg/kg (over 7 times less toxic than BA) but .6% is 6 times stronger than what the label allows to be used on a maintenance program, such is the bug man coming in every three months to help keep the insects away. So if that is the case .1% would have a ld50 greater than 120,000mg/kg which would be over 43 times less toxic than boric acid. But wait...once the water evaporates you now have that highly toxic cypermethrin hanging around....in this case remember all numbers are approximates..every substance has different actual weights when compared to another and there is converting ml to mg to deal with also....
Using the lower rate found on boric acid dust labels (97% strength), if an ounce contains 28350 mgs (rounded up) then an ounce (2 table spoons) of boric acid at 97% has 27499.5 mgs of BA which has a 50% chance of killing 9.9 pound animal. ...amount of mg of BA in an ounce divided by the ld50 of BA (2770)
an ounce of .1% cypermethrin insecticide would contain approx 28.35 mg of cypermethrin in it, which means it would take 8.8 tablespoons to reach it's ld50 of 250. But the ounce of boric is 9.9 times above it's ld50 for just one tablespoon. It would take 87.12 ounces (almost three quarts) of the cypermethrin product to achieve the amount to have a 50% chance of killing a 9.9 lb animal, compared to one ounce for BA. The average amount of insecticide used in a home on a quarterly basis around plumbing, corners, windows etc might be 20-25 ounces.
BA is cheap and easy to use and can be effective, but it is not the safer alternative.
Lar
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lar wrote:

...
Just to put this all in perspective, the LD50 of table salt is somewhere around 4000mg/kg, so while these insecticides are more toxic than table salt, they really aren't all that toxic to mammals.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lar wrote:

with another "ounce" instead of "tablespoon" after that
Lar
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wouldn't put it in the cabinets, just "dust" it under the cabinet before you set them. The bugs tend to go where you can't see them diring the day and that is where I would treat them. If you are "infected" you need more extensive treatments, even calling in a pro. The trick is to keep down the stragglers before you get an established population.
The nasty roaches are the little ones anyway. (asian and german). The big scary looking "american" cockroach we get in Florida is really fairly easy to kill. They are "palmetto bugs" in the same sense a roof rat is a "palmetto squirrel". They both live in the trees outside and stray into your house if you let them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
clipped

opening. My son trapped a bat in his house a while back. It landed on the window side of a sheer curtain, and he smacked something flat against the curtain to trap it. Thought it should be dead, smashed flat, but only injured. Got a box to take him outside and finish the job.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Norminn wrote:

Bad exterminator joke... an adult mouse can get into the opening the size of a dime...an adult rat, an opening the size of a quarter. So what's the difference between a mouse and a rat? 15 cents....
Lar
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When I had my roof rat problem I found out that rat can chew his quarter sized hole through 3/4" of plywood in about 10 minutes. I plugged a hole and 10 minutes later it was back.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 14:43:43 -0800, Daniel Prince

I wouldn't block the hole right away, I would put a glue trap in front of it. Mane sure you lond it down well. I usually staple it yo a piece of plywood or tywrap it to a 1/8" steel plate that is too heavy for a rat to run off with. If your cat caught one you have more.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.