Best way to repair notched joist (with pic)

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Considering you have a tile floor above it and it hasn't cracked I wouldn't mess with it to much..Glue and lag a couple of sisters if you'll sleep better and move on...
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I sorta agree with you. It's not a great big deal and many are over thinking this. My house, which is 7 years old has floor joists made out of two 2x4's laying flat with 1/2" osb between them vertically. I am sure if he attaches a piece of plywood with just some glue and some 8d nails, it would be fine and hold any load one will see in a normal house, even a piano.
Hank
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I still use the term 'lag', also, when the state of the art has passed them by. Nowadays there would be very few situations where I'd reach for a lag (and the drill to bore a pilot), instead of using self- drilling structural screws that can be driven with an impact in a couple of seconds.
In the OP's situation I'd rather have more smaller fasteners that were easier to install, than a few larger ones that were more onerous. In the day sisters were simply nailed and they held just fine. Now everything is glued. Either glue or structural screws would be fine by themselves, but you need the clamping pressure of the screws if you're going to glue, so...
Another thing about lags - their maximum diameter is restricted to 1/4 of the wood thickness that the business end is buried in - in this case a 2x would allow a 3/8" lag. Lags are notoriously crappy metal, made in places where lag guilds never took off, and their load capacity is not all that much greater than other choices such as common nails and structural screws, which are easier to install.
There's really not a lot of load on a typical floor joist. Figure a 12' span and 16" OC with a 40# live load, and that's about 640# total for the full span. A 10d common nail can take about 70# in shear, so we're not talking about a lot of load, fasteners or concern. Particularly since the OP's joist has been like that for decades.
One caveat - make it pretty. Even if the repair is a straightforward one and not structurally critical, a sketchy looking repair will raise more flags when the house is sold. So make it a neat, workmanlike job.
R
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I still use the term 'lag', also, when the state of the art has passed them by. Nowadays there would be very few situations where I'd reach for a lag (and the drill to bore a pilot), instead of using self- drilling structural screws that can be driven with an impact in a couple of seconds.
In the OP's situation I'd rather have more smaller fasteners that were easier to install, than a few larger ones that were more onerous. In the day sisters were simply nailed and they held just fine. Now everything is glued. Either glue or structural screws would be fine by themselves, but you need the clamping pressure of the screws if you're going to glue, so...
Another thing about lags - their maximum diameter is restricted to 1/4 of the wood thickness that the business end is buried in - in this case a 2x would allow a 3/8" lag. Lags are notoriously crappy metal, made in places where lag guilds never took off, and their load capacity is not all that much greater than other choices such as common nails and structural screws, which are easier to install.
There's really not a lot of load on a typical floor joist. Figure a 12' span and 16" OC with a 40# live load, and that's about 640# total for the full span. A 10d common nail can take about 70# in shear, so we're not talking about a lot of load, fasteners or concern. Particularly since the OP's joist has been like that for decades.
One caveat - make it pretty. Even if the repair is a straightforward one and not structurally critical, a sketchy looking repair will raise more flags when the house is sold. So make it a neat, workmanlike job.
R
Again more over thinking and less reading...The OP said it will be buried in a wall..He has a tile floor above it that hasn't cracked nor does he want it too by doing to much ...
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.
The joist will be buried inside a wall...huh?
Another question - you believe that knowing the loads involved is a liability?
If he doesn't jack the joist more than just enough to take the load off, there's zero chance the repair work will crack the tile floor.
R
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.
Wouldn't lag screws be "gentler" on the tile floor above than either a hammer or an impact wrench?
Drilling with a standard drill and using a rachet to drive the lags wouldn't subject the grout or tile to any excessive vibration.
I'm just sayin'...
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Depends on the tool and fastener. A nail gun would be preferable to a 28 oz framing hammer in a dyslexic's hands, and an impact driver (not wrench) driving a 2' or 3" screw would kick up about as much of a problem as a fatass dog waddling around upstairs.

True, enough, just slow, and lags are problematic when they're shallowly embedded. Lag bolts have seen their day. They had a good run - let them pass in peace and don't make them linger.
R
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re: "an impact driver driving a 2' or 3" screw"
I'm thinking that maybe a 2 foot screw would be a bit excessive for this particular repair. ;-)
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wrote:

I'm thinking you're bragging now. ;-)
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wrote:

Only if I fold it in half.
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Wouldn't lag screws be "gentler" on the tile floor above than either a hammer or an impact wrench?
Drilling with a standard drill and using a rachet to drive the lags wouldn't subject the grout or tile to any excessive vibration.
I'm just sayin'...
EXACTLY...
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Exactly what? You feel that using an impact driver to drive some 3" screws is going to break up the tile floor above? If you're that worried about cracking I'm surprised you aren't suggesting that the holes be drilled with an eggbeater drill and wooden dowels glued into place. Why don't you do yourself and the OP a favor and see what sort of shear load a 3/8" lag can hold embedded 1.5" .
Lags are a dead technology. Old timers in construction have a hard time of letting go.
R
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One of the easiest ways I have found to repair something like this is with a steel plate. I weld so its not much trouble for me to do. Steel offers up a lot of strength in a small package.
Jimmie
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