Best way to level a building

Page 1 of 2  

I just moved a fairly good size shed. It's now on my property and still sitting on the trailer. The spot I'm putting it is not very level. The shed has a treated 2x6 framed plywood floor is going to be set on concrete blocks (like it was where I bought it). Only I plan to put in 4 of those trailer house anchors on the corners and put some chains to eyebolts under the floor. I dont like free standing sheds because a heavy wind can flip them over.
Anyhow, I plan to put blocks in all 4 corners and also in the center. But the land where I am putting it is pretty crooked. What's the best way to level the shed? I'd normally just put a level in the middle of the floor and level it in both directions, but until I get the blocks under it, the floor has a bit of a sag in the middle. I know this because the plywood siding has a gap in the rear which was not there before the move. (it's sitting on the trailer across two railroad ties on each end, so the tires did not drag against the floor). That's why the center of the floor has a sag. I know this will all straighten out when it's blocked, but I'm not sure how to level it with the present sag in the floor.
The shed floor size is 12 X 16 feet, and the walls are 10 ft. in front and 8 ft. in the back, with a 2 ft. drop on the roof from front to back.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Use what I think is called a "line level" String with a level hanging from it?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
High Explosives.
nb
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jun 14, 3:37 am, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

For an existing structure place all the block pads and level them before moving the shed on top of them. You may need to measure the underside to make sure your interior pads meet up with a floor joist. 12x16 is pretty big, you might consider several interior pads rather than just one.
I don't know where you are but I've built several 10x10 sheds around our neighborhood. All on block pads. I've not staked any of them down and none have ever moved. But these are converntional construction with 5/4 pt floors, 2x4 frames, wood lap siding, and asphalt shingles.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jamesgangnc wrote:

Yes... I've had some empty for a while and the wind never budged them. And what the hell am I thinking? How many places have we seen sheds for sale that were empty? And how many of them got blown around during storms? If I see a bunch of them upside down tomorrow I'll know it was someone here! I suppose hurricanes, or tornadoes can throw them around, but most of them would self destruct if tied down. I suppose staking it down would be like they do to house trailers, so the shed will become a permanent building and add to the property taxes?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Years ago I had a 36 foot long x 14 foot wide (3 section) horse shelter flip right over on it's roof, and that had eight 4x4 posts 3 feet in the ground. I had just built it. The high winds ripped it right out of the ground, flipped it, and it was 25 feet away from where it originally was. All the fences came down with it, and all the horses were loose. What a damn mess. Luckily no horses were hurt other than a few minor scrapes. I had built the shed so strong it never came apart, but several posts snapped and the tin roof was pretty damaged as well as a few cracked rafters.
The only laughing part of the whole thing was the stallion. He had all the mares to himself, and instead he was hiding in the remains of another tiny 6 foot pony shed which was tipped on it's side, and he barely fit in it, because it was only intended to be a pony shed. He was scared to death. According to the weather bureau it was just high winds. I say bullshit, it was a damn tornado. It also took shingles off the house, the garage, and the concrete block barn as well as 2 of the 3 couplas on the barn were tore off, and a horse trailer was on it's side. I stake my horse sheds after that, and I'll stake any other shed too. Of course THAT storm would likely have ripped those out too.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jun 15, 4:13 am, horseman& snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

If you're going to stake the floor joist system to the ground then you also need ties from the wall to the floor system as well as hurricane straps from the roof frame to the wall. Otherwise the wind is just going to take it apart at it's weakest link.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Where I live, 50 mph winds are common. The most they have been since we lived there in four years is 78 mph. If you want to see just how windy it can get in your area, just build a shed and don't stake it down. I predict you will find out within a year or two.
Steve
Visit my site at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
All errors, brain farts, misspelled words intentional because this computer is set to Spelchek French, and I can't get it to do any different.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SteveB wrote:

At one house I had the seller left 2 sheds that were about 10 years old, no sign of them being blown around. Then in the following 12 or so years while I was there they never moved from the wind. 22 years and the wind never bothered them. But before the house was built, the trailer that was tied down very securly moved 1/2" in a gust of wind. I felt it, and I was scared the whole thing would tear up and fly away but it stayed. It actually bent the trailer. From underneath I jacked it up with three bottle jacks and suddenly it popped back a half inch to where it originally was on the blocks. It never lifted off the blocks, just slid sideways.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
horseman& snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

Well I suppose it can happen, but evidently it is quite the exception rather than the rule. Does the closest place where they sell sheds tie down the model sheds? How many have toppled?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why would the shed dealer stake them down? If they blow away, insurance covers them. Then he doesn't have to sell them!
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony wrote:

Most places, nope- only a permanent building if it is bolted to a slab foundation. In this part of country, you do not pay property taxes on a trailer, even a double-wide that will never be moved again. But you DO pay property taxes on the garage and front porch most people around here add to them. Silly, I know, but even up here in snow country, most trailer owners are retirees, and they vote, so nobody wants to mess with them.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
aemeijers wrote:

In PA and TN house trailers are taxed just like all other permanent buildings. Many years ago in PA people used to try to avoid property taxes on house trailers by leaving the axles and wheels on. They got away with it for a while but not in years. If you poured a footer for a shed it was taxed, I'm not sure about being tied down, because I have never heard of a shed being tied down until reading this thread.
But you DO

Yes here in these parts of TN my front porch is recorded on my tax info along with the garage, AND the attic above the garage! It's not even a finished attic... yet. I suppose when I finish it I'll have to keep the shades drawn. I can't complain too much, my taxes here are still well under $1000/year and the house I sold in PA my taxes were almost $4,000/year, and that wasn't any mansion either!
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Three sided horse shelters used for horses and other livestock are notorious for flipping over. The open front allows wind to just flip them. People who know what they are doing, know to face them south to protect the animals as well as it's less likely strong winds come from the south. But winds CAN come from the south at times, and sometimes because of the land layout or other factors it's not always possible to face them south. East is the next best choice. I have one shed like this. If I faced it south, the opening would be against the barn. If I moved it away from the barn, it would be going downhill where all the water would run inside. I had to face it east.
Getting back to the original point, horse shelters almost MUST be anchored. They are made to be moved and have railroad ties under them that are meant to be moved (slid on the RR ties). It dont take much wind blowing into the open front wall to flip em. I rarely move mine, but I always put 4 of the three foot screwin anchors into the ground in each corner. There's a large eye bolt in each corner connected to the upright posts (not the bottom RR tie). I take a short piece of heavy duty chain and go thru the anchor and eye bolts, and use a good solid grade8 bolt thru the chain to form a loop. They are almost straight up and down so horses dotn get a leg under them. If the chains stick out, I put a large rock or concrete block under them so horses dont get a leg under them.
This way they are safe from average high winds (not tornados). They're also safe if a horse was to slip on mud and fall against the building (yes that does happen). This not only protects the sheds, but also the horses. Having a shed fall on a horse is not a good thing.
I'm not taxed on these portable sheds, and anchoring them does not make them "permanent". I'd do the same thing for any other shed larger than a doghouse.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I suppose staking it

Check local codes. In a lot, a building is considered for taxation if it sits on a foundation. Otherwise, it is classified as a temporary outbuilding, and not taxed. Also, it may have something to do with your zoning. I life in an AG1 zone, that is single family houses up to 25 acres. The rules are a lot less stringent than 1/10 of a mile away across the street where it is residentially zoned. I recently moved in two seagoing containers to make a shop out of. No permit required. Nothing. Across the creek, they are not allowed. Check locally, as the way things are where I live, and the way they are where other people live have nothing to do where your taxes are computed.
Steve
Visit my site at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
All errors, brain farts, misspelled words intentional because this computer is set to Spelchek French, and I can't get it to do any different.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SteveB wrote:

I've heard and read about using the shipping containers for building sheds, shops, and even houses! Can I ask what they cost and their size? And how did you go about finding them for sale? I've heard they are cheap because of all the importing the US does, it doesn't pay to ship them back empty.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony wrote:

Cheap is relative, a 40' container in good shape runs around $1.5k - $2k delivered. They are big steel "LEGOs" and if you can cut and weld steel you can make just about anything out of them. At a friend's place we are in the process of building a barn/shop/cabin out of three 40' containers along with some additional steel truss roof framing to enclose a larger area.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Video:
http://video.bobvila.com/m/21320565/converting-steel-shipping-containers-to-housing.htm
These were sat on a block foundation wall...
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dang, I paid $2300 each for my two forty footers. But that was the cheapest in the area. I have them parallel, 16' apart. I got some very good steel roofing, and going to put some trusses over it, and shade it in. I already put two doors in, one in the center of each, opening out to the area between. They are six by eight. I will eventually concrete the floor between them, and add swing doors made out of the cutouts to block wind. I currently either get free six by eight feet door cutouts or for five dollars each. Then I take telephone poles, cut them to eight feet, put them a couple of feet in the ground, and use the panels for a very stiff tough fence. I put them into the poles with long allthread, weld them together, and cut the top into a mountain shape on the longer panels. The poles are $20 each, so it comes down to $2 per foot for a fence that would stop a HumVee.
There are some sites dedicated to the use of containers in unusual ways, from making mountain cabins, to multilevel shops, to lots of things. I am considering setting another across mine to achieve shade, a second level, and a hoisting beam over the patio. I am in an AG zone, and can go up to 35' vertical with no permit if it is used for agricultural purposes. I am also considering adding a couple of smaller ones here and there for insulated offices, or even a guests remote bedroom.
Steve
Visit my site at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
All errors, brain farts, misspelled words intentional because this computer is set to Spelchek French, and I can't get it to do any different.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Tampa, Florida has a small community of homes built with shipping containers. Placed on a slab foundation, welded together (hurricane code) and doorways cut in for each room. Neat stuff.
Guide for buying one (others out there)
http://www.midweststoragecontainers.com/used-shipping-containers.htm
A 10' unit may be harder to come by, at least 'round here.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.