Best Waterproofing Solution

Hello,
I have a small window into my crawl space area that has cracked masonry around it. When it rains, water flows into the crawl space area via these cracks. I'm not sure how I should repair this. Is there a special crack filling compound I can use on the masonry? How about waterproofing paint to seal it up?
I've been to Lowe's and see that they have:
1) UGL Drylock - Latex Based Masonry Waterproofer 2) UGL Drylock - Oil Based Masonry Waterproofer 3) UGL Drylock - Fast Plug Hydraulic Cement
What is the difference between these, and are they any good? Is there a better product out there for what I'm hoping to do (ie: seal and waterproof this window).
Thanks Sam
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On Sun, 14 Dec 2008 13:31:16 -0800 (PST), samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

You don't say how big the cracks are, or where exactly they are located.
The two waterproofers are intended to prevent moisture flowing through undamaged masonry. They won't seal any but hairline cracks. In general, the oil based version works better than the latex, but smells horrible and is harder to clean up after. They are really dampproofers, not waterproofers in that they won't stop serious amounts of water against the wall.
The hydraulic cement is designed to fill holes and larger cracks. It sets chemically and can be used even on wet materials. It swells slightly when it sets so it seals tightly. You have to work very fast, it sets in minutes.
The hydraulic cement should only be used on cracks or holes within the masonry, not between the masonry and the window or other non masonry material. For sealing cracks between dissimilar materials, use caulk. Caulk can tolerate movement that occurs between dissimilar materials. For this you would want a polyurethane caulk made to stick to masonry surfaces. The surfaces generally have to be dry (and above freezing) to caulk.
All of the above assumes this problem area is inside or outside above ground level. If it's outside below ground, you need a different approach.
Hope this helps,
Paul F.
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I used UGL in my poured-concrete basment walls (Two of my basement walls are underground and the other two walls are above ground.) After 16 years there is some cracking but my basement has been dry due to landscaping changing and adding longer drain lines, extending existing downspouts, etc. Seeing a picture would help. Do you have spaulding? Watch carefully where the water is entering and where it puddles nearby, you may need flashing, better overhang, etc. Sealing a crack or two may be just the beginning of a larger project. There are a number of caulk products available that are specific to masonry, and that may be what you need. Follow the preparation instructions carefully.
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From the way I've used it, the first two are for painting on the masonry to prevent water from seeping through it. The Hydraulic Cement is for patching cracks and what I would use for the repair.
Mike O.
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On Dec 14, 4:31�pm, samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

reslope yard so water runs away from home
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*What exactly is the "Masonry" around the window. Is it poured cement, concrete block, cinder block, brick or stone? How long and wide are the cracks? Do you have some pictures to post?
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