Bats

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Bats. Need to get rid of them in my house. Tried and tried to plug holes, crevices, possible entries without success. I believe they are originating in the attic possibly via the soffits; coming down inside the walls and exiting through the basement and then into the house. It was 34 degrees outside last night and I had another one inside. Not good when there is a baby in the house. How can they survive without food? Can I plug up all the holes and starve them out? Any lethal or non lethal tips are appreciated. DJ
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Moth balls thrown in attic, and hide the blood
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<< Bats. Need to get rid of them in my house >>
Good idea. But consider this: bats are the one of the most unfairly maligned species in our lives. Do some serious research on this and you can get some real benefits from the little critters. The best way to deal with bats in your house is to build them their own house. Once established, they will munch on all manner of flying bugs that make your backyard barbecues a chore. Start with the usual Google search, then the library and so on. Local colleges are also good places to find out more. It may take some time but from what I've read it beats the **** out of a bug zapper, OFF deterrant, or smokey torches. HTH
Joe
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On 24 Feb 2004 15:56:12 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comtosspam (Joe Bobst) wrote:

Way true. Bats are good things. But probably better outside than in.
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I got curious and did a google search on "bat house design" and got over 300 hits. I read through a few and realized that the design of a bat house seems to be specific to your area. That makes sense if you think about it because different bats may like different types of houses.
Just adding my 2 cents.
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if you want me to try.
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True, but not entirely. The ultimate factor that will determine whether a bat house will support a colony is sufficient exposure to direct sun. Bats will not stay in a house that's too cold. Bats need heat early, and they need a lot of it throughout the day. Color is certainly a factor that determines how much sun will or should be reflected or absorbed depending on your particular latitude, but proper exposure even for a properly-matched coloration is why you just can't put up a bat house facing any ol' direction or any ol' place (like in trees, lower than 7 or 8 feet above ground, facing clothes lines or any other solid obstructions they could fly into, next to driveways with lots of car traffic, etc.) and expect it to thrive. Some orientations (especially south and east) are better than others, and some (due north) are practically useless, especially in the northernmost states. Bat conservation sites and instructions that come with really good bat houses discuss the importance of sun orientation at good length, and often the measures of success even for "good" orientations can sometimes come down to just a few degrees on way or another.
Also, while bats seem to like their homes to be of generally similar dimensions, all bat houses are not the same -- especially when it comes to how closely apart the interior slats (which they cling to) are set, and how well bats can cling to the surfaces of the slats.
Bat houses sold thru recognized bat conservation outfits seem to follow the research and work into what makes a successful bat house by the the state agriculture or forestry department (forgot which) in Pennsylvania. Those sold thru catalogs or general stores generally don't, and consequently often fail to attract and/or keep colonies.
Not being a smarty-pants here. It's just that we've have had Big Brown bats in and around our house for years, and we like 'em and do what we can to keep 'em, so I kinda absorbed this stuff out of necessity.
AJS
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if

Yeah, I neglected to mention several things...sorry. The space between slats is determined by the local bat types. And, as you mentioned, location is important as well. You can get away with a 10' height in some places, but 20' seems to be the recommended height. All of mine are 18' and they are packed from about the middle of March through mid December....the little brownies migrate.
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This is Turtle.
Yes , Bats are good for your area around your house. The bat will eat his or her weight in bugs [ if supply is present ] everyday. That is a lot of bugs that get eaten.
TURTLE
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You should check out www.batcon.org . I have 4 bat condos out in the back yard and I have very little problem with mosquitos. Considering that I live in SE Texas, that's a pretty amazing accomplishment. The little guys don't enter the house because they prefer theirs, and they're fun to watch in the early evening.
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the flight path of ours when they leave the roost at twilight, and it's a hoot to watch the "what the hell was THAT??" reactions of unsuspecting pool guests when they get buzzed by the occasional low-flyers that are there and gone in the blink of an eye.
AJS
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Here are a few links to get you started:
http://www.batmanagement.com
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_MG342
http://www.dupageforest.com/Wildlife%20Web/preventing_probs.html
http://wildlifedamage.unl.edu/handbook/handbook/allPDF/mam_d5.pdf
http://www.dnr.state.md.us/wildlife/batdoors.html
Some of the material here will help you identify the locations where bats are entering, and there are also suggestions for how to close up the holes you do find. Basically, you caulk up all the cracks you can find. Also, you probably want to make a one-way bat door to make sure the bats get out and can't get back in. You don't want the bats getting in, and then dying inside the wall somewhere after you seal up openings because they can't get out.
Ken
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Also, www.batcon.org . It's the Bat Conservation website.

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- DJ -

- Nehmo - If your exterior walls are hollow, you should put some insulation in them anyway. But once you've done that, what's wrong with letting the bats live in your attic? Bats eat many harmful and annoying insects. Bats look spooky and popular fiction has maligned them, but they are our friends.
Maybe you could give them alternative accommodations: Bat Project http://www.batcon.org/bhra / Bat house plan http://midwest.fws.gov/marktwain/kids/crafts/nestbox/nsbox7.htm Scott's Bat House Page -- Free Bat House Plans http://www.users.ms11.net/~habitat/bat/bathome.htm
- DJ -

- Nehmo - What's the meaning of your temperature reference? Do you mean the bat was seeking refuge from the cold? I don't know what's typical for your area, but 34 F isn't very cold.
- DJ -

- Nehmo - Normally, a bat won't attack a mammal. The blood-sucking bats are in South America; the ones up here eat insects. There's a possibility a bat may have rabies, but all in all, your baby isn't in much danger.
- DJ -

- Nehmo - You just said you "tried and tired to plug holes", so if you are now asking if you are capable of doing this, you already have your answer.
But obviously, if sealing your attic is your strategy, catch or shoo out the bat *before* you plug up the holes. To catch the bat, maybe use a butterfly net, and then release the poor creature outside. You should always use the most benign method when dealing with nature.
- DJ -

- Nehmo - Yes, killing yourself and your family would solve the problem ;-)
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On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 11:08:18 -0600, "Nehmo Sergheyev"

You like living with guano? I for one wish to have as little shit in my life as possible.
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DJ wrote:

As the others have said, bats are really kind of neat. My son had one at an apartment that spent the day between the storm window and the regular window of his bed room.
There are different kinds of bats and many are rather small and can get in or out of a very small space. Most like to enter at least 15 feet off the ground. That may help you find the entrance.
Personally I like them, but I would rather then not spend time in my home. I will also suggest that they are not dumb and once they find that the inside of your home, well at least inside the interior walls, is not good for them because of you, they will lean to say away.
I have had to help get a few of houses from time to time. The tennis racket trick worked. If you don't hit them too hard and work quick you can shake them off outside. If you are agile you may be able to get them to fly out a window or door. That has worked for me also.
Good Luck
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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DJ wrote:

There is a real "movement" about to protect them. In Florida parks, there have been some bat shelters built to try to keep them out of the picnic shelters, because their droppings landed on picnicers. Basicly, a roof with some cross members beneath so they have shelter and free access. Some folks attract them, like having a beehive. Check with your county extension service to see if someone can help. In the mean time, try to put hardware cloth between attic and basement so's they don't come downstairs.
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They're in your house because they're hibernating in your attic or walls and pretty much have had all the food they need at this point.
First, visit http://batmanagement.com/havebats/batconflicts.html to get a more authoritative answer to your dilemma. If you're still stymied -- especially since you really don't want to kill them or evict them when it's cold outside -- I corresponded a few times last summer with a very helpful gentleman by the name of John Chenger at Bat Conservation and Management, Inc. If you want the very best possible answers to your problem, drop him an e-mail at snipped-for-privacy@batmanagement.com.
For many years, we have had two sizeable colonies (more than 60 total) of Big Brown bats in both our attic vents, which have been screened off with thick hardware cloth (mesh) to keep them from actually getting inside the attic. Hopefully, a bat house in our back yard will ease the squeeze up there or attract a whole new colony.
The main thing to know is that a bat that gets lost inside the house won't harm anyone in the house. They'll surprise the living bejeezus out of you, but they won't bite or attack unprovoked -- unless you go doing something stupid, like try to wack them with a tennis racquet. They're decent-tempered critters, but you can still manage to piss one off. Contact the bat people at the addresses provided to find how to safely catch a bat in the house and how to handle it safely once you do (heavy leather gloves are a must; I keep a pair of welder's gloves for the odd time or two that one manages to zip into our house thru an open door when they leave the roost at night -- and what you should do with the darn thing since it's now the middle of winter.
AJS
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says... :) Bats. Need to get rid of them in my house. Tried and tried to plug holes, :) crevices, possible entries without success. I believe they are originating :) in the attic possibly via the soffits; coming down inside the walls and :) exiting through the basement and then into the house. It was 34 degrees :) outside last night and I had another one inside. Not good when there is a :) baby in the house. How can they survive without food? Can I plug up all :) the holes and starve them out? Any lethal or non lethal tips are :) appreciated. DJ :) :) :) this site has bat traps... http://www.wildlifecontrolsupplies.com/ Also, not sure if I can explain this, but block off as many opening as you can except the main one. Use a 2-3 inch pvc pipe and extend it a couple of feet from the house, let the bats get used to using it. Then create with thin/flimsy screening material a sock open on both ends of about 2-3 feet in length and secure one end to the plastic entrance. The bats exit the attic through the pipe are able to drop out of the "sock" but because it is flimsy it closes and hangs down a couple of feet of where the entrance actually is.
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but it is the second mouse that gets the cheese.
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Just want to let you know that some bats are a protected animal in some places. Be careful about your solution.
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8^)~~~ Sue (remove the x to e-mail)
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