Bathroom odors

In one of our three bathrooms, we have a slight sewer gas odor. But, even a slight sewer gas odor is unpleasant, so I need to fix it.
The odor is not coming through the shower or lavatory drains, but from the commode area. We have tried airing out the room, then not using this bathroom for two or three days, but the odor remains. The toilet bowl holds the normal level of water, so I don't think it is coming up through there.
The only thing I can think of is the wax ring must have deteriorated, although I have not ever heard of this happening. Our house is sixteen years old, and we have lived in much older houses, and never had to replace a wax ring.
I don't think it makes any difference, but we are on a septic system since we are outside city limits. The system is working properly, and has recently been pumped out. This did not have any effect on the odor.
I'm too old and stiff to tackle the job of changing the wax ring myself, but wonder about how long of a job this might be since I'll hire it out.
All comments welcome and appreciated.
Bob-tx
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Bob-tx wrote:

If it's just a wax ring issue, it's under an hour to replace, if a problem is found such as a crack in the waste pipe it could take a lot longer.
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OR a blocked vent forcing the smell up through any escape that is available.
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On Mon, 27 Jun 2011 16:33:29 -0400, "EXT"

Check and see if the odor is coming from the sink or bath tub drain. We bought a new house in Lexington, KY an within a month or so we were smelling a sewer gas type odor around the sinks. The plumber came back to check for the problem. He said that it was quiet common for the traps to have a bacteria growth that smell like sewer gas. He suggested using Listerine, however I used chlorine bleach. I kept a plastic squirt bottle filled with bleach and would squirt about a table spoon full in the drains as needed.
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On Jun 27, 3:47 pm, "Bob-tx" <No Spam no contact> wrote:

around. Empty the tank after turning the water off. Then disconnect the water at the tank. Now it's ready to be raised up. Small wrench to undo the nuts, and it's ready to be 'levitated'. Put a newspaper alongside and have the helpers raise it up, and set it on the paper. Replace the wax ring. Then reverse the process. Snug up the nuts so the toilet doesn't wiggle, no more. Then in a couple days, do it again.
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Adding. YOu have to turn the toilet on its side to scrape off the old wax ring. That will dump all the water in the trap. Best done outside or do the turning in the bath tube then set on towels for the scraping.
Also, wax-rings are about passe. I have switched to the "waxless toilet seals". Simple, easy, can pull and replace the same toilet without replacing the seal.
Harry K
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On Jun 27, 3:47 pm, "Bob-tx" <No Spam no contact> wrote:

Before you change the wax ring, check under the rim inside the bowl. I had a similar problem years ago with a toilet that smelled for no apparent reason. Using a mirror and flashlight, I discovered that the back drain holes under the rim had become closed off with mineral deposits over the years. Since the water wasn't rinsing back there with every flush, it allowed odor-causing bacterial to build up. I opened all the holes with a nail and solved the problem.
Replacing the wax ring isn't difficult; unscrew the two bolts holding the toilet to the floor, lift it off the pipe, tip, remove old wax ring, put on new wax ring, re-install. An experienced plumber should be able to do it very quickly.
Paul
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On Jun 27, 3:47 pm, "Bob-tx" <No Spam no contact> wrote:

I agree, the wax ring could be yout problem. Before going there check under the sink to make sure you don't have vent valves. Replacing the wax ring on an old toilet would be an hour at most. It's not so heavy if you take the tank off first. If you do that get a new tank gasket too.
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On Jun 27, 12:47 pm, "Bob-tx" <No Spam no contact> wrote:

Probably already answered. I use google and it is basically dead but...
The odds are that the wax ring is shot and the floor and/or subfloor is rotted which may be the source of theodor.
Anyhow, changing the ring is a matter of only a few minutes. The cost will come from the 'service call' and 'mileage' charge. I am 5 miles from the plumbers office and jsut paid $80 service call and $10 mileage fee to replace the drain plumbing under a sink. Like you, I am too old tobe crawling around down there.
Harry K
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On Jun 27, 2:47 pm, "Bob-tx" <No Spam no contact> wrote:

Jst caulk the bottom of the toilet tight, I have had that issue many times in apartments.
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ransley wrote:

Never do this!
If you do have a leak or have one in the future you may not find it until the floor boards are rotted out.
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Amen to that! That is fixing the evidence, not the problem.
Harry K
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