Bathroom exhaust fan


Hello,
We are looking to have an exhaust fan added to our two bathrooms. A new roof was installed this past May and I had the roofer already add the exhaust vents. What is a fair price to have them installed? Also can anyone recommend a good quality one?
Thanks, Nick
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Nicky my lad, do you think the size of the bathrooms, the access to its ceiling fro above, if any, the distance to the roof, the kind of roof and waterproofing, access to electricity, the kind of fans you want, etc., etc,...........might have any bearing on the cost? Hmmmm?
Do you think you might get a better answer if you took the time to give us that info??
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Not seeing the work to be done, I'd guess between $100 and $1000, but I could be off by 25%.
Panasonic
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I tend to agree. If everything else is in place, wiring, switches, vent piping to an outside vent etc. etc. one could probably go to a big box store, pick up a fan and a few bits and pieces and install it oneself for $100 or less. That's what we would do to replace our existing bathroom fan etc. However; it if it requires 'all new'; for example wiring into and existing wall, cutting that wall, patching and re-plastering that wall, etc. etc.! Then when it comes to roof work? Is a scaffold required; safety gear to prevent worker falls? Making sure the contractor has liability insurance while working in/on your property etc. etc. Time to get to your location, do the work, clean up and return to base? Any permits required in your jurisdiction? If so who gets them? Could be $1000 easy! Also btw considering that cost of materials could be the least part of the job. rather like saying a good cook can make a cake that is applauded by all by using a small amount of flour, some lard, a smidgen of spices, a few handfuls of raisins/nuts etc. a greased baking dish and a whole lot of skill and know-how in an oven set to the proper temperature!.
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Broan makes a model called QTXE. They come in CFM from 80 to 150, with or without lights. They are very smooth and quiet. I personally prefer them over Panasonic models which are also smooth and quiet. As for the installation, there are to many variables, so it's best to get prices from local contractors
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Roy, how are these fans for retrofit? I like the Panasonic's because I can sometimes change out the builders cheapo bath fans where there is no attic access with a Panasonic without having to tear the ceiling apart. Is that possible with this particular Broan model?
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No John, that's the one area where Panasonic really has them beat. You have to have deep enough joists (12") to push the entire unit into the ceiling almost vertically, then lay it on top of the sheet rock and connect the duct fitting and duct, then slide it into the hole. For attic installs, they're really good, cheaper than Panasonic, no vibration, and every bit as quiet, although they (Broan) claim it's the quietest fan on earth, or some such thing

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"RBM" wrote

Good info. One of these days, I want to remove the existing fan we have and replace with a properly vented one. Right now, it just vents to the attic crawlspace believe it or not. One of my 'tricks' previous owners left us. (meantime we plastic sealed it and its causing no harm).
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Is the electricity for the fan already wired in?
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On Tue, 09 Sep 2008 14:49:21 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com wrote:

Fair is when you reach your ouch factor.
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On Tue, 09 Sep 2008 14:49:21 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com wrote:

There was no previous exhaust fan so the electrical work must be done and a cutout must be made. That's probably all I needs as I can make the connections myself between the exhaust fan and roof. The gap between the ceiling of the bathroom and the roof in the attic is less than 6 feet so there is no need for scaffolding etc as the gap between the ceiling and the attic roof is less than 6 feet.
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snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com wrote:

If there is no electric, then the cost of the install could vary greatly. If it's easy to (safely) tap into an existing circuit, and easy to place the switch/humidistat, then it should be relatively cheap. If not, then not.
BTW if you "can make the connections (your)self between the exhaust fan and roof", then you can probably make the cut out also. Most fans come with a template. Drill four holes in the corners and connect the dots with a small saw. If you have easy access in the attic as you say, it's all the easier since you can see obstructions before you start cutting.
That just leaves the electric, which with a little research, you might even be able to tackle yourself.
Man, this just keeps getting cheaper all the time!
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On Tue, 09 Sep 2008 14:49:21 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com wrote:

Get several estimates and check references to get the best value. Actually, this is a fairly easy DIY project. Panasonic makes excellent exhaust fans, expect to pay 25% more for quiet.
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Check out Fantech. They make inline fans so you can locate the motor away from the ceiling. You can also install two grilles in the bathroom with a Y connector, provided you choose the right CFM of course. The PB100 is a kit with fan + grille @ 100cfm for about $150.
http://www.fantech.net/bathroom.htm Scroll down tto the PB series - right below is a picture of how it looks installed.
On Sep 9, 2:49pm, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com wrote:

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Just to throw another potato into the stew, I prefer a unit that is able to be turned on by its own humidity sensor. Sure cuts down on mold accumulation.
On Sep 9, 2:49pm, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com wrote:

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On Wed, 10 Sep 2008 08:38:37 -0700 (PDT), Michael B

The sensor is asking a lot, do you really think this is a good idea or even necessary? I put in 30-minute wall timers in the bathroom fans which works well after a steamy shower--absolutely no mold in 16 years.
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No point in arguing with success. I have an Aprilaire sensor, rewired to trigger on humidity rise rather than fall. Works so well, I did the same thing for my A/C. (Inserted in series into the red wire).
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I also went with timers over humidistats so the fans can easily be used any time someone wants to - and they were much cheaper.
However, the *main* reason I installed timers in the first place is because no one else in the family was able to figure out how to use the toggle switch.
It seems that everyone knew that "up equals on" but apparently no one knew that "down equals off".
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On Sep 9, 2:49pm, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com wrote:

I can't help you with price, but I do suggest that you look around at the more expensive units. They will last longer and perform better. The one thing most people don't seem to think about is how noisy they are going to be. In the store with all the background noise they will not sound nearly as loud as they are going to when you have them in your home. Yea, the good ones are generally expensive.
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On Wed, 10 Sep 2008 09:07:33 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@columbus.rr.com wrote:

Grainger has 3 Broan Exhaust fans, an 80CFM,110 and 150. Our bathroom is 6'10x6'10x7'5 and the other one is 8'x5'x7'5", would an 80CFM be sufficent? Our bathrooms are fairly small.
Thanks, Nick
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