Basement water questions

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lots of troubles can be proven, take bad sewer, find plumber had snaked for old owner bam they are on hook, roof leaks, contractor gave estimate 2 years ago, bam old owner on hook. helping a old girl friend who was buying home i called roofer i knew to inspect. he arrived and said need new roof, and chimney needs rebuilt. i said you havent been up there. he said i have been up there 4 times in last 5 years, fixing leaks, why bother climbing up again, roof needs replaced.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

OK, you lucked on the same roofer as the old owner had...
But, how do you know otherwise which tradespeople the old owner used? Once in awhile, there's a service sticker or something, but that may not mean anything. And *they're* not exactly itching to get involved in a lawsuit either.
Banty
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On Fri, 01 Jun 2007 08:44:59 -0700, Banty wrote:

The lawyer can subpoena repair records from the previous owner. Perhaps credit card charges or similar stuff looking for plumbing bills related to the water problem. A private investigator can be hired. if the previous owner is caught lying, and compounding it by lying in court, hes gonna pay a nice toll.
Still not easy, but it is doable.
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one must be careful the cost to do all this doesnt exceed the cost of repairs.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

??
What plumbing bills would related to a basement moisture intrusion problem ???

Yep. And, I hardly think repair records are like a pilot's flight logs - they're of course not required of a homeowner; there is a good chance nothing like that exists. Even if there are, think of all the DIY, cash transactions, stuff simply left unrepaired. You can spend a pretty penney for not much, very quickly and very likely.
Not that we shouldn't disclose (I certainly plan to - but I have or will correct the problems I know of), or that in some cases an undisclosed problem should be pursued with the previous owner.
But this idea that pops up here in alt.home.repair from time to time that there's always recourse and disclosure laws "protect" one is folly. It really doesn't work that way all that often, and several things need to go in one's favor to be able to prove an intentional non-discosure. The best course is to carefully look over any house considered to be bought, and be prepared (including financially) to make repairs as time goes on.
Banty
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if your main concern is pump failure then install TWO sumps both interconnected by the underground french drain each sump with its own drain line going outdoors and perhaps each with a battery or if your on city water a water backup pump.
True it will add some costs but not a whole lot.
Or just add a extra sump pit at a convenient place to exit a pump.
then wait awhile if you see a lot of water volume then have the contractor or plumber add a second pump.
you may find water volume isnt much, and then you can relax, but know a extra pump can easily be added any time you want
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Thanks for taking the time write all this out.
My property is basically flat, so no area is below the basement level. A pump is needed. We already purchased a special-order battery backup pump, which the basement company suggested we do. (They offered the option to buy it on our own to save some money.) We ordered a Zoeller 510, which is the same brand of pump the basement company uses as the main sump.
I had one contractor who was adamantly against weep holes. It's so confusing.
Vickie

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On Mon, 28 May 2007 04:26:54 -0700, Vickie wrote:

Basement drainage systems are not about removing water, they are about removing water pressure. If you do not have water pressure pushing on your walls, then the piping system should not move that much water. If you do have pressure, then ignorning it so long as you cant see the water coming in is akin to burying your head in the sand. The problem still exists.
Putting in a sump without drains is a waste of money IMHO. If your gonna do a thing, do it right. If you dont add the piping, it wont fix your problem. You need something to catch a flash flood of sorts. If there are no pipes, then it will take a long time for water to weep across the basement to the sump pit. during that time there will be pressure and water will be coming in as it is now.
Personally what I would do is put in the sump if you wish, and run just 1 weeping tile from under/around the location where the water is entering now, to the sump pit. Then if/when you find new locations that leak, add new weeping tile. I dont think it should cost any more to add these pipes one at a time so long as you consider expansion when you add the first. Unless your basement is finished.
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But apparently in her case, there has been only 1 water problem in 20 years and it was coming in at one specific spot. In this case, putting a sump pit in that one area could very well work, as the water doesn't have to come from all areas of the basement., it will be right near the one trouble spot.

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On May 30, 12:27�pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

well every 4 years they get other water in. apparently in a different spot in the basement.
no one has to do anything. maybe being 50 and spending a lifetime of patches today I prefer to do it right, do it once, then forget about it and relax. often its less work hassle and cost.
The contractor who recommended against the weep holes that floors me.
they only do anything if water has infiltrated the wall, and you REALLY DONT want water trapped in the wall.
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On Wed, 30 May 2007 13:49:43 -0700, Vickie wrote:

What you should really understand is the issue with water. I suppose you could say there are 2. Discomfort, and damage.
Sump systems are designed to prevent damage. They remove water pressur on your basement walls, thus avoiding the wall and floor cracks that eventually come from that pressure.
If you dont think you have a pressure problem, and you just want to stop water intrusion, then why not find where it is coming in, and patch the hole. You will be increasing the water pressure on your walls, but if you insist its not a problem and a rare occurance, then so be it.
I hate to find out later though that you cracked a wall/floor rather than put in a proper relief system.
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its impossible to completely seal walls and floors that absorb and have cracks and openings from water getting in.
take the typical dry lock paint used on a block wall with water inside it,
eventually the paint will bubble or the wall crack and mold will likely grow on the wall,
your much better off keeping the walls dry and redirecting the water away from your home
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says...

Yes, that's what they are. And they are a necessary part of the interior French drain system.
B-Dry (the system I have) puts a thick vinyl cover over the bottom 8 inches or so of the interior wall to cover the weep holes.
On your problem, I think you can probably two-stage it - first, the sump where you have an issue. Then, if you still have an issue - the interior drain system tying into the sump.
Then, as long as you power the pump, you're in good shape.
Banty
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yeah they just drain the interior of the block. so water cant get trapped inside them.
at least do the full drain in the areas effected by water, you can add more later
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Its a once in a lifetime flood. Who cares! Ignore it, get over it, and get on with life. People are living in temporary housing because there house washed away or has 10' of water in the living room because of that storm. If I were you, I would sit back and relax, and prepare the the next storm in 20 years.
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Thank you, but I do not need to be reminded how others fared worse than myself and I should just "get over it." I live in a town that floods regularly and we have mulitple FEMA offices because of it. I am fortunate to not live in the flood plain by the rivers. Many have chosen to have their homes reclaimed by the government, after this last episode.
Last month I gave a deposit to the waterproofing contractor and since then have gotten a wide range of opinions and suggestions. Before I spend thousands of dollars I'd like to understand the situation better so I don't open a Pandora's box of other problems.
Thanks again to the people who've taken the time to be helpful.
Vickie

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On

I have NEVER heard of what your considering making the situation worse!
one friend had to have the contractor return and add a run under center of floor, even after all that work a underground stream surfaced there. the contractor did it for free.
later he found that before his home was built a stream ran thru his lot, and had been filled in. no wonder he had troubles.
the extra underground run dried things up permanetely. 5 years later he sold the home the dry basement warranty.
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Vickie, sometimes the best advice of all is the easiest, to just ignore it. See, won't take long. I was not saying you should ignore it because I didn't want to give an alternative longer solution, I genuinely believed (and still do) that you could indeed ignore it and not spend a penny. Is that not the best solution financially?
Best of luck whatever you decide.
Dean
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nothing is certinally a option. but looking at things the long way. the biggest investment most of us own is our home so its generally a good idea to take care of it.
now waiting awhile after the big flood may get you lower prices, because right now crews are likely very busy.
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