Basement receptacles GFI ... what about broken receptacles to control lighting ?

If I wire the basement with GFI receptacles, is there anyway that the receptacle can be broken so that one half of the duplex could be used to control lighting in the room ?
Thanks
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I'm not sure what you are asking here. There is a combination device made which is half GFI receptacle and half single pole switch.
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On Sat, 31 May 2008 18:25:06 -0400, "John Grabowski"

He wants one which is half GFI and half controlled by a switch. He probably wants that half to be GFI also. Like a normal receptacle can be split into two halves.
OP, I think the word "broken" is misleading. You mean split into to, not "inoperable".
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Typical duplex receptacles can be broken to provide one receptacle that is hot all the time and anther controlled by a remote switch. (common practice). Now can I do that with a GFI duplex receptacle ?
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Typical duplex receptacles can be broken to provide one receptacle that is hot all the time and anther controlled by a remote switch. (common practice). Now can I do that with a GFI duplex receptacle ?
No, but you can have a switch and a split receptacle downstream of a GFI to give you what you want. As RBM mentioned, GFI receptacles are not required in finished basements. The unfinished part must have at least one GFI receptacle.
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I like that option, probably save a lot on all those GFI(s). If I use a GFI breaker, do I still need to have GFI receptacles in the unfinished portions of the basement if the circuit is protected by a GFI breaker ?
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I like that option, probably save a lot on all those GFI(s). If I use a GFI breaker, do I still need to have GFI receptacles in the unfinished portions of the basement if the circuit is protected by a GFI breaker ?
Nec requires unfinished parts of basements to have at least one GFCI protected outlet. The method of GFCI protection is your choice
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..
When splitting a receptacle, is there a standard as to which side is switched; Left or Right for horizontal mounted and top or bottom for vertically mounted ?
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When splitting a receptacle, is there a standard as to which side is switched; Left or Right for horizontal mounted and top or bottom for vertically mounted ?
Your choice
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I like that option, probably save a lot on all those GFI(s). If I use a GFI breaker, do I still need to have GFI receptacles in the unfinished portions of the basement if the circuit is protected by a GFI breaker ?
No, but you should label them as being GFI protected. If you haven't considered this already, it might be a good idea to separate ceiling lighting from the GFI protected outlet circuit in case the GFI trips.
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Assuming you want to split the tops from bottoms and have wall switch control of half of each outlet, no, GFCI outlets are not made that way. If it's a finished basement, there is no NEC requirement to use GFCI outlets. You can however use GFCI protection for the entire circuit or circuits, then split standard duplex outlets and switches
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