attaching framing studs to poured concrete

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On May 9, 9:26 am, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

To each his own...I far prefer the powder-actuated route, particularly if it's an old, really hard cured slab. The Remington is pretty inexpensive and unless it really is only a one-time and one never does this kind of thing except once in their life, once you got it, you have it for whenever/whatever...
...

Perhaps although I've never had a treated sill plate fail on a dry slab if there weren't a real water problem. Again, personal preference...
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True enough. But, I put in a lot more wall in our basement than the OP is going to, the floor is over 20 years old, and all the drilling together amounted to about an hour and a half with a wimpy cordless hammer drill. With a good AC powered hammer drill (not even a hilti), it would have totalled about 15 minutes.
It seems like lots of general contractors prefer the tapcon/hammer drill route too.
I'd use the a power hammer so rarely that I'd worry about losing the durn thing, plus having to fuss about which power load to use.
And it's a teensy bit more difficult to adjust if you change your mind ;-)
[I _hate_ nails ;-)]

Building code here _requires_ the plastic. It doesn't require treated. While treated makes a lot of sense, especially as perimeter sills in termite areas, it's generally not necessary for interior partition walls if you've otherwise solved the floor moisture transfer issue.
Some people just don't like treated lumber inside the building envelope in any event.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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Ramset and Pressure treated sill plate.
Done

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Liquid Nails alone won't do it - I know from experience. It may hold once you have the stringer anchored into the other walls, but depending upon the closet configuration you could still end up pulling the stringer out of whack.
What I did was pre-drill holes through my 2x4s approximately the same diameter as the shaft of the Tapcon screws I was using so the screws could continue to turn after bottoming-out without biting into the wood. I used those holes to drill pilot holes for Tapcon screws into the floor using a high-quality masonry bit and an AC electric drill for this - don't even think about using your 18 or 24 volt cordless drill.
I bottomed out the Tapcons in the 2x4, coated them with Liquid Nails and ran a bead of LN between the pilot holes in the floor. Placed the 2x4, ran the screws in, and let the stringer dry 24 hours before I tried doing anything else.
Held like a mad beast.
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