Are name-brand low-energy fluorescent "Green" bulbs any brighter than store brand?

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Doc wrote:

Have you let 'em warm up--generally takes a CF a bit to come to full brightness.
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I have noticed that some new CFLs will take 5+ minutes to reach proper brightness on the first run even at room temperature. After this first burn in, they come up to brightness normally (within 30 seconds or so) after turning on from a cold start. The first time it happened to me I though the bulb was bad, but the ones that did that have been fine ever since.
In a cold environment, they will be slower to warm up.
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Doc wrote:

It should be very close to a 100w bulb once its had a couple of mins to reach peak output. Maybe you've got some junk halophosphate ones.
NT
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Doc wrote:

In a 72 degree house it takes less then a minute to warm up. For my 100w equal I use the Sylvania CFL23EL Micromini 3000k. Works great for me.
Chris
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Doc wrote:

What name brand? They are 99% made in China. For more light output try daylight kind which has higher color temperature.
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Tony Hwang wrote:

nasty
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On Nov 29, 2:01pm, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

I thought it was 100% china as of a few months ago
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My expereince is that higher color temp. ones produce slightly less light than ones rated 2700-3500 K. Higher color temp. ones do work better outdoors at night however, because their spectrum is more favorable to night vision.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Doc wrote:

Well, they should be brighter than a 40W incandescent. Check the lumens rating, that gives you a number to compare. A typical 100W incandescent is around 1600-1700 lumens. Walmart doesn't seem to give the lumen ratings on theirs but a Sylvania CF23EL is indeed rated for 1600 lumens.
It may take it a few minutes to reach full brightness.
But it seems like all the companies cheat on the "equivalent to" rating, if they say "equivalent to 100W" I figure it should be a bit brighter than a 60W.
Dave
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wrote:

My experience is that non-dollar-store CFLs marketed as equivalent to 100W significantly outperform 75W "standard" 750 hour incandescents rated 1190-1210 lumens.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On Nov 29, 5:22pm, snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

The Popular Mechanics test and maybe CR tested and published Lumen output.
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ransley wrote:

I would not take lumen claims on the package as gospel truth. I have had some fall significantly short, notably many Lights of America and MaxLite models that I tested, and in my experience every dollar store unit of a "dollar store brand" whose package made a claim of light output in lumens.
Ones of "Big 3" brands (Philips, GE and Sylvania) and ones with the Energy Star logo are more likely to be truthful with claims of light output in lumens. I have also found N:Vision (a brand pushed by Home Depot) to be truthful with light output claims in lumens. My experience is similarly good with the brand available in CVS stores. I would expect the brand pushed by Lowes to be similarly good in meeting claims of light output in lumens.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Don Klipstein wrote:

Lumen output drops quite a bit throughout a CFL's life, whereas filament lamp fall in output is much less. Consequently to get a real equivalent one needs to start with higher lumen levels than the equivalent filament lamp.
NT
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snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

CFLs when aged to 3,000 operating hours have about 10% (maybe a bit more) loss of light output compared to that at 100 hours (industry- standard break-in period, immediately after which their light output is "officially" determined).
So the 1600 lumen "100 watt equivalents" can fade to about 1400-1450 lumens at 3,000 hours, and fade a little more to maybe about 1300 lumens if and when they get to 6,000-8,000 hours or so. Even that is still a bit brighter than "standard" 75W incandescents.
If your home is one of those where the line voltage is on the high side, then incandescents will have much-enhanced photometric performance. Light output from a CFL may be merely roughly proportionate to line voltage, while incandescents have light output typically proportionate to line voltage to the 3.4 or so power. So if you hit a 1190 lumen 75W 120V incandescent with 124V, then you get about 1330 lumens from that incandescent. In homes with higher line voltage, incandescents get a "disproportionate boost" in performance - if you are not bothered by them not lasting as long as they should.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Don Klipstein wrote:

Many of us now use CFLs rated at 10k hrs mean life, so many of them will go on to well over 10k. Using your figures and extrapolating wildly, at 15k hrs they will have lost somewhere vaguely in the region of 50% output. Not that bad in most cases, but yes big drop.
NT
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snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

As it turns out, the "halflife" increases a little as the lamps age. So ones that make it to 15K hours have more like 70%, maybe 75% of the light output that they had at 100 hours. I have actual experience in an apartment building that had CFL hallway lights and some of them lasted that long.
I have seen a few CFLs faded to about 60% or 2/3 or so of their original light output, after over 2 years of continuous operation. Most don't last that long. If one makes it in home use past the 6,000-7,500 operating hours that they used to be rated for, then I think its owner will be quite happy with it in terms of actually achieving the long life that they are supposed to have. My experience seems to support a figure more like 4,000-5,000 hours, due to average ontime less than the "industry standard test condition" of 3 hours, and average ambient temperature around the lamp and ballast housing hotter than the "industry standard test condition" of 25 C.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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[ ... ]

FYI, within the last 5-6 weeks I noticed one of my porch lights was blinking on and off--a GE FLB17 16w CF with external envelope--and had to swap it out.
That light had been in near-continuous operation since about 1993 or 1994. It was out on Halloween nights and during a few power failures.
Calculator tells me that's over 120,000 hours. It's output had faded quite a bit (the 75W incandescent I replaced it with was _much_ brighter--and lasted less than a month) but it was still adequate.
I'll be looking for some more of those...
Gary
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Gary Heston snipped-for-privacy@hiwaay.net http://www.thebreastcancersite.com /

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Look at all the hardware stores you can get to - I suspect that one is obsolete.
Otherwise use a Philips "EL/O" / "Outdoor". Last time I checked, that was still available at Home Depot in 15 watt (optimistically 60 watt equivalent). Get the 5000 Kelvin "daylight" version if you can - the spectrum is more favorable to making use of night vision.
If the fixture is enclosed, Philips SLS ("Marathon" triple-arch) non-dimmable 23 watts or less (especially 15) should work well. Go for 20 or 23 watts if you need the extra fixture heating to get adequate warmup in the winter.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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wrote:

Philips, GE and Sylvania 23 watt ones as well as those other brands prevalent in home centers (such as N:Vision) generally achieve 1600 lumens after warming up for a minute or two. Higher color temperature versions achieve closer to 1500 lumens. 1600 lumens is close to the output of a "double life" 100 watt incandescent. A "full blast" 100W 120V incandescent achieves 1670-1750 lumens.
I like to think of 23 watt CFLs as being about halfway between a 75 watt and a 100 watt "standard" incandescent (750 hours) in "real-world" light output.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Doc wrote:

Get a light meter and measure the lumens of a 100 watt bulb then a 23 watt CFL after it warms up.
--
Claude Hopper :)

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