Anyone store firewod in a basement?

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Hello all,
I have a 70x33' unfinished basement, and there's plenty of space there. I was planning to move some firewood down there, its already mostly seasoned (for a wood furnace there). Perhaps a couple of cords, which is like 4 tons.
Has anyone done this? I'm concerned with the wood getting damp again. The basement is quite dry, around 50% humidity if I use a dehumidifier occasionally. And sometimes I might have to bring in seasoned but wet (rained or snowed on) wood, so it will have to dry. Could keep a fan blowing around the wood, and keep the dehumidifier on low.
Tips and experience welcomed here!
Dean
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I might be more worried about termites.
Bob
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wrote:

And carpenter ants.
If you have an outdoor shed that seals tightly, set off an insect bomb in there before you bring the wood in the house.
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no experience but... you've gotta heat the house somehow. but it seems counterproductive to have to operate a dehumidifier [which amounts to an indoor window air conditioner with a bucket] to dry the wood electrically at the same time you are heating the house with wood. [or are you just using the wood heater for the basement?] maybe synchronize so a heat duct sends some heat into the basement when it's too cold and damp. maybe a humidity activated exhaust fan in the basement like the new ones for the bathrooms. it may be an interesting way to keep the house humidity at a comfortable level during heating season.
also, see cornell link regarding FIREWOOD STORAGE AND BUGS at
http://www.entomology.cornell.edu/Extension/DiagnosticLab/IDLFS/FirewoodInsects/FirewoodInsects.html#N10145
they want your wood outdoors and have some nice insect photos there too.
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Spiders , carpenter ants, termites etc. keep it outside its been heating homes fine for 10000+ years with few compliaints, just cover it on top.
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Seems like double the work to me. Carry it all down there, stack it, carry it back up. PLUS, all the critters you provide prime housing for. Spiders, termites, ants, all sorts of nasty things.
Spray you say? Spray poison in your basement? What is wrong with that picture?
I'd leave it outside, cover it, and be done with it.
Steve
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Bugs is the only consideration. If you can trait the wood first it is really a good idea as the wood will be warmer and dryer, thus burning better. Wood is often a hiding/nesting place for carpenter ants and other insects, as well as moss and mold on the bark.
Solve the insects and it is a good idea.
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Stacking wood outside is much better. Like everyone is saying bugs are a problem you don't want to have. I bought one length of 14" diameter PSM SDR 35 PVC sewer pipe to use as a chute for my firewood. I cut a hole in my basement wall, cut about 5' off the bell end of the pipe, stuck it into the hole so the bell was just sticking out of the basement wall, pointed it down toward the basement floor at about a 45 angle. Once I had the pipe about where it was going to be I drilled some holes in the top part of the pipe, that would be in the wall, and installed some carriage bolts from the inside and put nuts on them. These would inbed into the concrete and hold the pipe in place. Then I put forms around the pipe on both sides of the wall and poured some 5000 pound bag mix concrete to fill the void between the wall and the pipe. After the concrete was cured and I had removed the forms, I trimmed the pipe in the basement to where I thought it should be. Then, after taking the rubber seal out of the bell of the pipe, I stuck the left over piece of pipe into the bell and cut that off to a height that would be comfortable to throw wood into. This way I can remove that piece of pipe if it happens to be in the way for whatever reason. I stack my as wood close to the pipe as I can. This has saved me many steps in getting the wood into the basement. I bought one of those galvanized "ash cans" that are like a regular galvanized garbage can but only about 18" tall. This fits over the outside end of the pipe to keep out the rain, snow, raccoons, ect. At the bottom of the pipe, I cut a circle of 2" Styrofoam and stick that in the end of the pipe so the heat won't escape up the pipe.
--
JerryD(upstateNY)
>> I have a 70x33\' unfinished basement, and there\'s plenty of space there.
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Dean,
My mother does this. She stores about1/4 cord in the basement so she can fire up the furnace without going out. Moisture from the wood has never been a problem. As others have said watch out for bugs.
Dave M.
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I cut, junk, split and store my wood outside in the wind (covered) from april to august - then the full 5 cords go into the basement. Never had a problem with bugs or moisture.
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dean wrote:

I have been keeping firewood in my attached garage for 3 years with no ill effects. I haven't gotten any bugs or other critters, although the garage is NOT heated, so the bugs are either dead or in limbo in the winter.
It sure burns a hell of a lot better, though.
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Larry Bud wrote:

Mine is stored two ways. That cut this year is stored outside uncovered to cure. In the fall I fill my woodshed just off the patio with 3 1/2 cord and move another 3 cord into the back 3 season porch. That wood was cut the summer prior so it has had one summer and one winter to cure. Also no problem with bugs other than the occasional spider. Usually only use about 5 cord. Oil useage per year? I fill my 250 gal tank about every 2 years and even then it only needs topping off, never more than 1/2 tank.
As to moisture in basement - wood will cure down to, or absorb moisture, to match the prevailing air moisture. Thus if you have 50% humidity in the basement, your wood will stabilize at about 50%. Cured outside you can get it down to about 30%. That info is from a wood heating technical book lo those many years ago. I probably still have it around someplace but...
Harry K
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I don't think it works quite like that. If it did, storing wood in 100% humidity would make it 100% water. Not too likely. Water evaporates even at 90% humidity - it just does it slower.
Bob
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No, it does not work that way one is relative humidity, the other term is the actual percentage of the wood. Air dried lumber will get down to about 12%, kiln dried down to about 7%. Cut a piece of wood from a tree and weigh it. Then put it on a scale over time to see what happens and there will be a lot of loss of moisture. The rule of thumb for drying lumber is one year per inch of thickness. Same concept with firewood, the more exposure, the faster it dries.
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Yeah if you look into moisture in wood, there is a lot of liquid water, which accounts for most of the total water content. Its spunged up inside the cells. This all dries up completely, irrespective of outside humidity levels, although it may be slowed by high relative humidiy.
There is also the vapor part of water in wood, and that does decrease with decreasing relative humity, but its only a small part of the total water content of the wood.
Its not quite that simple, as there are hygroscopic chemicals in the wood that do naturally absorb water to a certain equilibrium, but you get the jist of the argument (I hope).
Dean
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No.
You might well look for it.
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Well I won't bother to look for it (might some day) but do -you- have a source other than your personal opinion?
Harry K
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Harry, Nick is right. There is liquid water within wood, and that will ALL evaporate unless the outside humidity is 100%. The dryer it is outside, the faster it will evaporate. Once all the liquid part is gone from within the cells, the vapor part in the wood will form an equilibrium with the outside air, but that's not a big part of the water content of wood.
Dean
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dean wrote:

Much as I dread getting into that back closet I guess I will have to dig and try to find it. I would not be surprised to find my recollection of something over 30 years ago is wrong.
Harry K
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Harry K. wrote:

http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/fplgtr/fplgtr113/ch03.pdf
Table 3-4 shows the relationship between temperature, relative humidity and wood moisture content.
R, Tom Q.
--
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