Another Question on Light Bulb Wattage

Sorry, I know this sounds ignorant, but I am still confused for those who were good enough to answer my first question on this topic.
If my lamp socket is rated a maximum wattage of 660, does this mean I could use a 100 or 250 w bulb in the lamp (all the way up to 660)? I have just never heard of this type of high rating for a lamp.
My neighbor thinks the lamp was probably originally bought from a foreign country as he has never heard of this high of a rating.
Totally confused, and thanks in advance for any help.
Corinne
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Corinne wrote:

http://shop.store.yahoo.com/cinemasupplies/chinlansocas.html
That's the socket rating and it's pretty standard. It does indeed say you can use up to a 660 watt bulb, but I personally wouldn't dream of going that high with an incandescent bulb (never even seen one), but a 100 or 250 watt bulb would be no problem for the socket. That is _not_ the same thing as what the light fixture itself is rated for. Frequently fixtures are rated much lower - 75 watts is not an unusual rating.
R
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That 660 isn`t watts but volts it may be omly 75 watt rated, probably from china.
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Thank you so much.
m Ransley wrote:

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On Mon 28 Mar 2005 09:07:36p, Corinne wrote in alt.home.repair:

Years ago there were far fewer individual lamps in most rooms. It was not uncommon to have a bulb as high as 250 or 350 watts, particularly in floor lamps.
The socket itself is often rated much higher (for added safety) than would be a desirable wattage for practical use.
Modern lamps often have a sticker attached to the socket that states not to exceed, say, 60, 75, or 100 watts, where in fact, the actual socket itself it probably rated at a much higher wattage. The sticker is the "practical" safety rating for the lamp as a whole.

I doubt it. Most foreign sockets are very different from those in the US.

--
Wayne Boatwright
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OK i just found an exterior fixture laying around. it has a ceramic socket rated 660watt 250 volt but the fixture says dont use more than a 60 watt bulb. So the socket can handle it but the globe will melt. A Table lamp is also rated for what can melt or cause a fire with the shade, so you are missing the bulb- lamp rating, use common sence , a cloth or plastic shade can melt and burn. usualy 60 to 100 is max but i have used 150 ok and have burnt shades at 75watt.
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Very, very helpful. Well, now I will use a 60 watt bulb. I sure don't get much light though as this is a victorian shade that has fringe on the bottom of it.
Much appreciated.
Corinne m Ransley wrote:

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R:
Ok, this really explains it much better. I appreciate your time.
Corinne
RicodJour wrote:

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Thank you again Wayne. Unfortunately, there is not a sticker inside this lamp, but I will put a 75 watt bulb in and be safe.
Again, much appreciated.
Corinne
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

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Corinne wrote:

Very unlikely that is is 660 W It may be 660 V (volts). Even if it (the socket) were rated for 660 W it is doubtful if the lamp is rated that high.
Nearly all ratings are for the max and anything less is OK.
--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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050329 0558 - m Ransley posted:

I really doubt it! I am quite certain that if 660 volts were put on this socket with a lamp in it, it would blow up. I don't know what kind of a bulb would be for even 440 volts in a table lamp. Never seen one.
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It's also not uncommon, when you take one of those older lamps apart, to see cracked insulation that crumbles when disturbed because it's been baked to a crisp by those hot light bulbs.

Those wattage limits are based on the temperature ratings of the conductor insulation. They are there for a *reason*: use of higher-wattage bulbs can damage the fixture wiring.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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wrote:

If you want to be safe, use a 60W bulb, or a compact fluorescent.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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I think the real message is...
if it's real old, get the wiring checked first.
mark
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It does say, "660W", so I am assuming that means wattage. Just to be on the safe side, I have installed a 75 watt bulb.
Thanks everyone for your help.
Corinne indago wrote:

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