Another plumbing issue ... broken drain pipe from sink to line in basement

I posted earlier about the issue with getting a new toilet installed. That's taken care of ... but there's now another plumbing problem that my plumber and I are facing.
Our house, as you could probably gather from my post about the toilet, is very old. The pipes underneath the house are cast iron. There's a pipe that runs from our kitchen sink's drain down to a cast iron pipe in the basement (unfinished dirt basement) where I guess it runs to the main line.
There has been a leak around the place where the pipe from the sink drain connects to the pipe in the basement and water has been pouring from around it. It's not been an acute issue, because the placement of the pipe makes the water run right down into where our sump pump is at to remove any condensation, rain water, etc., that gets into the basement. So while the water around the pump may get a bit soapy (we're Luddites, don't have a dishwasher, still do 'em the old- fashioned way), it doesn't pool up because the pump pulls it out.
That was actually why I first contacted the plumber ... and it's taken a while because plumbers in my neck of the woods are kind of busy right now; people must be doing a lot of repairing instead of buying new stuff ... the toilet issue developed afterward. He inspected it and saw that the pipe was broken up at the top.
He came back today to take care of this issue (didn't get to do it yesterday since toilet was so problematic), went downstairs with his Sawzall with a cast-iron blade to try to cut out the offending piece of cast iron ... and the entire pipe broke. I'm not sure how extensive "broke" is, my wife was there, I've been at work and am typing this on a break, I'll see the damage when I get home.
The plumber is supposed to come back in a couple of days to try to fix the issue, he had other commitments that he could not break for this afternoon. As I said, it's not a horribly acute issue because none of the water was going into the pipe to the main line anyway, the break was so big, and everything is still going right into the sump pump to be pulled out.
I'm just wondering how big and complicated an issue fixing this will be.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Maybe this will ease your stress.
While you are waiting for the plumber to come back, browse around this site. Fernco makes all kinds of repair connectors for just these types of situations. Since this a drain pipe, which is not under pressure, these rubber connectors and hose clamped fittings are perfect for the job.
I've got a couple of them installed at various locations in my house as we speak.
http://www.fernco.com/plumbing/flexible-couplings/qwik-tees-ells
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Plumber plans to use Ferncos to fix it ... and I'm home now and breathing easier, there's still a good foot of the pipe sticking up from the ground, and it looks like it was a clean break ... reason I posted in a panic was fears about it being broken off down in the ground (as I said, the Mrs. was unclear as to what she exactly mean by "broken") causing visions of (a.) jagged metal and (b.) excavations to run through my head, LOL! I don't think it will be a big issue, as I said the plumber I use is a pretty sharp cookie and knows what he's doing, that's why I let him do these things instead of trying to do it myself and wreaking havoc (about the extent of my plumbing ability is changing sink pipes when things go smoothly and there are no complications) and ending up spending more in the long run to repair what I've made worse.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

under ground isd just a bit of digging, concrete quakes in fear when your electric jackhammer shows up.
amazing how many are afraid to dig or break concrete or even drill a hole in concrete
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

In MANY cases it's best to go down to solid cast, use the Fernco to adapt to PVC and replace EVERYTHING from there up with PVC.
To the point now here in Ontario many insurance companies will not write a new policy on houses with (A) Galvanized water pipe, (B) Cast Iron Sanitary piping, and (C) Aluminum wiring except with CoAlr devices or the crimped copper pigtails.
Personally I have less use for the crimped pigtails than the Aluminum wire - I'm slowly replacing everything with CoALr in mine.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
One more thing ... should I be worried about sewer gas from this? I don't smell anything right now from the pipe. It's probably going to be Saturday a.m. before the plumber gets back out here, should I plug the pipe with something temporarily?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PRW wrote in

Plug it up with old rags, or tape a plastic bag over it.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Couple wraps of duct tape.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.