aluminum tape

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I've heard people mention using aluminum tape instead of duck tape on exhaust vents. Trouble is, does it really make a difference over duck tape. I notice that duck tape doesn't do squat for exhaust vents - it just wrinkles up and shrivels away.
Also, what does this stuff look like and is it available from the Borgs? Last time I looked, somewhat half-assed, I only saw duck tape.
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Eigenvector wrote:

Home Depot and Lowes both have it. Ask for the duct tape that is UL listed. I think it's about 15 or 20 bucks a roll.
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Is it actual tape, or something that I'll have to carefully clean the vent before using and then apply an epoxy to cure it? (yes I'm being hyperbolic but just to make a point)?
One of the nice things about duck tape is that you can practically apply it underwater and it will stick just fine.
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Eigenvector wrote:

It's tape. But it'll stick better to clean surfaces.
e.g.
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId4789-133-154789&lpage=none
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http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId4789-133-154789&lpage=none
Thanks, I didn't need the link, but at least now I know what the stuff looks like.
I'll go over the vents with steel wool and rubbing alcohol before applying it.
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Eigenvector wrote:

If it's really exhaust vents you're doing, there's some high temp stuff (a bit harder to find) you should use. I didn't read carefully the first time. All this stuff has a range of temperatures to which it's applicable.
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There are a zillion kinds with a zillion certifications. Covalence Adhesives makes the popular Polyken, Nashua and others.
    http://covalenceadhesives.com/Products.aspx
I'm not one to push Wally World but if you want some really sticky-ass foil tape, they have it. I doubt it is certified for anything except for sale at WM.
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Exuast tape I dought is code, proper exuast pipe instalation is all that is needed. Tape is for idiot hacks on exuasts
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You mean like idiots that can't spell "exhaust"?

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Craven Morehead wrote:

Dought say things like that!

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That one was like shooting fish in a barrel, ehhhh? :-) He didn't axe you to checks his spelling though.
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On Sun, 15 Oct 2006 20:11:29 -0700, "Eigenvector"

That might be why they recommend something else.
Duck tape was never meant for ducts, aiui. I'm not even sure it was named after ducts. Maybe ducks. Sort of like Gorilla Glue.

I'm sure they have more at the Borg than duck tape. Unless you went to Just Duck Tape, or Duck Tape 'R' Us.
I don't know what point you are making. If it is dirty enough, nothing will stick. If it is only a little dirty, everything will stick. Everything else falls somewhere in between. What are you going to do, use something that doesn't work, that shrivels up, just because it sticks well at first? I would dust the places about to be taped, and then I would tape the worst one or two joints and see how well it sticks over the next month or two. If it doesn't stick, I'd clean the others before I taped them. But I have a feeling you're just trying to goof on us with your reference to steel wool and alcohol. I think things will go better here if you show you are trying to be funny instead of just putting us on.
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I wonder about posts like these. It sounds legit, but then there's an aspect that is so boneheaded as to raise suspicion. If indeed the poster is wondering about stickiness, then we should advise him to properly prep the area first.
Aside from that, aluminum tape is the correct stuff for ductwork that requires insulation. Good old duct (not duck) tape is the correct stuff for ductwork that does not require insulation. You can use aluminum tape in place of duct tape, but not the other way around.
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Traditional "Duct" tape is not approved for ducts in my understanding..
Bob
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Eigenvector wrote:

Duct tape is ok for temporary uses but for long term use you need the real thing. You will usually find it in the heating and air conditioning section, not with the regular tape. It will be more expensive and you will need to peal off a layer off the adhesive as you use it.
As noted if you are working with the vent from a fuel burning heating device (not like a dryer or furnace duct), you may need a different material.
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Naw, its just for the furnace exhaust and the hot water heater exhaust vents.
Just out of curiosity, what kind of device would be burning too hot for aluminum tape? Fireplace insert or something similar?
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Eigenvector wrote:

I think it's the adhesive that isn't rated for high temps.
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Eigenvector wrote:

I was referring to those kind of exhaust. When I wrote furnace duct I was referring to the warm air delivery ducts that bring the heated air to the rooms. The Dryer duct is a little different as it does include the exhaust, but it is mixed with a lot of excess room air so it is far cooler than a typical furnace exhaust.
You do need the even more expensive tape for a furnace or water heater exhaust.

It is not the aluminum that is a problem, but the adhesive that will be damaged and fail.
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Damn, well I guess I'll go do some more research then.
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It seems to me that high temperature vents from gas appliances should be secure and air tight enough to not need any taping. There are codes for these things and I don't think taping is a permissible method of securing or stopping leaks.
Don Young
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