after installing toilet found too close to wall,H20 tank wont fit right, need 2in+

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After installing toilet started to finish with installing h20 tank. Water tank tilts forward. Need to move toilet at least 2 in more away from wall for tank to fit. Need to insert something into existing system with an attached flange so I can attach toilet to new flange and secure properly and have additional space for the water tank to fit.. This is a existing concrete floor with an existing workable flange. Just need the extra space. How do I get extra space or What should I use to create this extra needed space so I can attach water tank to toilet and finish my project.
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On Thu, 10 Apr 2014 16:44:01 -0700, WW

Is cutting an alcove into the offending wall not an option?
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Sigh. Another moaner who doesn't know what usenet is.
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On 04/10/2014 06:44 PM, WW wrote:

That does not sound like a very practical idea the chances of getting something to fit and not leak are pretty slim. I'd get a toilet with the dimensions of the previous one or a "high tank" toilet.
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philo wrote:

Hi, Measure three time B4 you cut. Does this apply here as well? For me it is difficult to understand the situation. Is there a smaller tank available some how?
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Sigh. Another unwarranted, unnecessary and unwanted comment.
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WW:
I agree with Oren on everything except the terminology. Oren says that different toilets come with different "offsets", and I call those different "rough-ins".
The rough-in is the distance from the middle of the toilet's drain pipe to the surface of the finished wall. Nowadays, most toilets are made to fit a 12 inch rough-in. However, most toilet companies will make toilets that fit a 10 inch rough-in and some will make toilets that fit a 14 inch rough-in. In your case, you probably removed a toilet that had a 10 inch rough-in, and you replaced it with one with a 12 inch rough-in, and now you're discovering that it won't fit properly. If you return the new toilet you have for a refund, and buy a toilet with a 10 inch rough-in, you should be OK.
As I did a Google search for "standard rough-in", I came across this page on e-Bay listing a fair number of brand new toilets that are made with a 10 inch rough-in:
'10\" Rough in Toilet | eBay' (http://www.ebay.com/bhp/10-rough-in-toilet )
Also, now that you have the toilet out, it's a good idea to paint the area directly behind where the toilet tank will be with several coats of interior oil based primer, which you still should be able to buy, followed by a couple of coats of Zinsser's Perma-White Bathroom Paint. The primer will be impervious to moisture, and you need that in the small gap between the toilet tank and the wall behind. Without that oil based primer, any condensation that accumulates on the wall behind the toilet tank will seep into the plaster or drywall and cause water damage to the wall there. Painting with an alkyd primer prevents the moisture from being absorbed into the plaster or drywall, and thereby prevents that water damage.
--
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replying to nestork , Mr. Kim M wrote:

Thank you for the information. I did measure as you suggested and the measurements were correct. I did not know the wall is not square. Thank you again for info.
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There are toilet flanges that have an offset. Can you remove the current f lange from the drain pipe and use an offset flange? Any reasonable plumbin g supply house will have offset flanges. You could also replace the 2x4 in the wall behind the toilet with 2x2 and refinish the wall to create a tiny alcove if the offset flange does not give you enough offset.
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On 4/10/2014 6:44 PM, WW wrote:

There are two toilet models. Most common is a 12" rough in, meaning finish wall to center of floor opening is 12". There are 10" rough in units that should be readily available. The other recourse would be to remove the existing floor flange and get and install an offset floor flange: http://www.plumbingsupply.com/toiletflanges.html . As far as I know these only come as 1 " and 1 1/2" offsets.
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"WW" wrote in message
After installing toilet started to finish with installing h20 tank. Water tank tilts forward. Need to move toilet at least 2 in more away from wall for tank to fit. Need to insert something into existing system with an attached flange so I can attach toilet to new flange and secure properly and have additional space for the water tank to fit.. This is a existing concrete floor with an existing workable flange. Just need the extra space. How do I get extra space or What should I use to create this extra needed space so I can attach water tank to toilet and finish my project.
-- Some one using my site. The REAL WW
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On 4/10/2014 6:44 PM, WW wrote:

As has already been explained, you needed a toilet to fit a shorter rough-in space. If you can't get a toilet to fit the smaller area right away, and need a toilet right now, you can probably make do by installing a smaller tank, one sized for the confined spaces in RVs and mobile homes. Odds are it will fit.
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On Thursday, April 10, 2014 at 7:44:01 PM UTC-4, WW wrote:

s

I have issue with 36 yr old Eljer Touch Flush. I have put up with 3 in the house for 30 yrs. I am too cheap to replace. The internal tank parts are ga rbage. I keep several repair kits on the shlf. Now master plumbers, I found the tank bolts had rotted away when one droppe d to the floor. I did not pull tank and rplace the gasket. When I got done tightening the b olts the da-- tank is now 1/8" from the wall. So, since I didn't disturb th e tank why is it now closer to the wall. I'm thinking the original plumber put it together, found the offset a bit close and left slack in the tank so it would len forward. Great workmanship found out after 30 yr. So, do I le ave tank loos?
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On Mon, 13 Apr 2015 18:01:33 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@iglou.com wrote:

You cant move the flange if it's in concrete. (not affordably anyhow). You'll just have to get another toilet that fits. I worked as a plumber, and I ran into that a few times. There is no way to offset the tank, unless you want to mount the tank on the wall, and run a pipe down (like they used to do in the early 1900's).
Your other option would be to move the wall a few inches (if it's wood and plaster, not concrete). Or, I have worked at a few places where they moved the part of the wall back, (just behind the toilet), by removing the plaster narrowing the width of the studs, then applying sheetrock. But that is all a lot of work. Just buy a toilet that fits your space.
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On 4/13/2015 8:01 PM, snipped-for-privacy@iglou.com wrote:

Or you need to measure the rough-in from the wall to the sewer pipe, and this time purchase a toilet that fits that rough-in. Current toilets generally use a 12-inch rough-in, but older homes frequently have a 10-inch rough-in. Not every store stocks non-standard toilets, but you can special order them if necessary. Your other option, if this is a two-piece toilet, is to purchase a slim-sized tank for tight/small spaces and attach that to your existing base. Been there, done that.
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2" is quite a move. There is such a thing as an offset flange for predicaments such as yours. Go to a plumbing supply company and ask about solutions to your problem.
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On 4/14/2015 6:26 AM, John G wrote:

There are offset flanges available. They are usually 2" and, I think, were designed to adapt 14" (wall to waste pipe) toilets to 12" and vice versa. I used one in a very small powder room where the toilet was deliberately put in a place so that the door would clear when opening inward. I changed the door to a pocket door and re-did the cabinets. In order to "fit" the cabinets, I needed to move the toilet 2" to the right, basically away towards the door. Unfortunately, the floor was concrete. I figured it wouldn't be too bad to chisel way a few inches, however, I eventually had to rent an electric power jack hammer. It took only about 5 minutes and the job was done. Next the cast iron pipe needed to be cut about 2" inches shorter (below the floor surface) to make room for the flange. I used a router with a 2 or 3 inch cutting wheel on an extension. Because this kludge wasn't rated to be run at router speed, I used a variac to slow it down. Again it didn't take too long and it was done. The new flange was inserted with a rubber seal ring and the floor was patched with concrete. Way too much work, but I was younger at the time and the whole remodel looked fabulous.
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wrote:

You mean they didn't just cut a hunk off the bottom of the door so it would clear the toilet?
Yes, in my years of working as a plumber, I saw this several times!
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On 4/14/2015 4:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Years ago, a coworker of mine hired a handyman to replace her toilet. The handyman failed to check out the existing toilet/bathroom first. He replaced a round bowl commode with an elongated model. Problem was just as you've described - it was next to the door, so now the door hit the rim of the new toilet. The handyman's solution: he cut a slot in the door at the level of the bowl.
And that, folks, is an example of how hiring a handyman can be a buyer-beware experience.
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wrote:

Before I became a plumber, I worked as a handyman. That is how I got the plumbing job. But anyhow, I would have never considered doing such a thing. I always did things right. In fact I got a few customers wanting me to do a half assed slop job, thinking it would be cheaper. I would explain that it would NOT be cheaper, if I had to use junky materials or patch together a faucet that was clearly overdue for replacement, and so on. If they insisted on getting a slop job, I usually told them to find someone else to do the work. I had plenty of work, and did not need to do jobs which would cause me problems. Doing a half assed job only invites callbacks, and then they expect the callback work for free.
Anyhow, like everything, there are good and bad workers as well as their customers.
But yea, I did see more than one door cut to fit around a toilet, and more than once I was called just to do something about this issued by a new home owner who bought the house with the cut away door. I recall one where there was no way to get a toilet that would fit, so after discussing this with the owner, the solution was to replace the door and frame, and make the door open outwards, which worked fine.
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