Adding UPS to light circuit

Page 5 of 5  
On Thu, 13 Feb 2014 17:32:02 -0600, The Daring Dufas

One that I installed in my brother's RV was 3 watts. That's getting awfully close to the limit on the bell wire. ANd PHONE wire is generally 22 guage, not 18 - so NO. You cannot use bell wire to wire a house for low voltage lighting...
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On 2/13/2014 6:44 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Then use landscape lighting wire or 18-16AMW stranded low voltage alarm or sound system cable. An alternative is what I do when installing CCTV cameras. I install a central 12vdc power supply and separate low voltage cables to each camera. A multi terminal central power supply used for CCTV cameras would be a good choice. It's not rocket surgery. GEEZ!
TDD
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On Thursday, February 13, 2014 9:55:05 PM UTC-5, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Again, he can do whatever he pleases, but landscape lighting wire is most likely not rated for use inside a building. What you proposed he wire up is a Class 1 low voltage circuit and it's covered under NEC.
An alternative is what I do when installing CCTV

It's not rocket surgery, but that doesn't mean that there aren't codes that are supposed to be followed. Why do it half-assed instead of reading the code, using the right materials, and doing it right? As an example to the practical problems you're left with, if someday he goes to sell the house, an inspector seeing phone wire used for low voltage lighting may flag it. Then he has a problem that he could have easily avoided by doing it right.
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On 2/14/2014 7:11 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I've installed both power and low voltage wiring in homes and businesses and never failed an inspection. Of course, because I was doing it professionally, most if not all of my wiring was concealed. All the wire met code for the circuits carrying low voltage even if it was two pair phone wire. I wired a lot of systems with beige or gray two pair phone wire and never had a problem with an inspection. The only consideration is the amount of current the wires will carry. All of the manufactured low voltage devices I've installed had a label with the amount of current each device used. If I installed home made DIY low voltage LED lights, I'm going to measure the current draw and run low voltage wiring that will carry the load, even phone wire. You keep making it way too complicated. o_O
TDD
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On Friday, February 14, 2014 12:13:25 PM UTC-5, The Daring Dufas wrote:

From my reading of the code, the system you recommended is a Class 1 low voltage circuit. I believe you proposed using a 12V battery kept charged with a battery charger to power the LED lights which would be installed in the house. Clearly phone wire is not code compliant for that application. May an inspector pass it anyway? Maybe in some places and maybe not in others. The enforcement level probably isn't going to be the same in a townhouse in NYC as it is in a small town in the Midwest All I'm saying is that there are NEC codes for this type of thing and in my reading of them, you can't use phone wire. It's not even clear what phone wire means anymore, as it's usually referred to today as Cat5. My reading of the code says the minimum allowed is 18 gauge.
I wired a lot of systems with beige or gray two pair phone

It's not just a matter of the current the wires will carry. Read Article 725 of NEC on what specific cable types are allowed. It's like saying you can use any wire for 120V circuits, all that matters is the current carrying capability.
All of the manufactured

It's not complicated to follow code and do it right. Is it that complicated to use the proper 18 gauge wire? In my reading of the code, that's the minimum wire size allowed for what you proposed. Have you read Articles 720, 725?
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On 2/14/2014 12:22 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I've installed thousands of feet of single and multi pair stranded 18 gauge jacketed wiring for all sorts of things. If the equipment I'm installing calls for it, I will use it. Some cities have their own version of the NEC. An example is Birmingham where I live which has a stricter interpretation of the NEC than the county I'm in. I remember reading something about New York where surge arrester multi outlet receptacle strips are not allowed. I imagine which planet your on would make a difference in the type of wiring that's required. ^_^
TDD
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On Fri, 14 Feb 2014 11:13:25 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Not everyone has the sense you have. And that's what's scary!!
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On Friday, February 14, 2014 1:40:40 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

You might want to read NEC Articles 720, 725 that specifically cover low voltage circuits, instead of being wrong on the code yet again.
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On 2/14/2014 12:40 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Believe me, I've always followed the code in whatever jurisdiction I was working in. Sometimes, a jurisdiction will require wiring that exceeds what's in the NEC specs. The trick is to know where you are and what will be accepted. o_O
TDD
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On Thursday, February 13, 2014 4:03:17 PM UTC-5, The Daring Dufas wrote:

I didn't say he couldn't do it. I just said that NEC applies to low voltage circuits run within a house too, and that I have doubts that using telephone wire to power lights will meet code. Whether it's DIY or done by an electrician code still applies. If he wants to ignore that, he's free to do so.
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