Adding UPS to light circuit

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...stuff about transmitters snipped...

We used hold fluorescent tubes near the tower. As you'd slide your hand up and down the tube, it would light up only above your hand.
It was pretty cool to be able to "move" light.
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On 2/13/2014 6:11 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I used to check the output of the two way radios I was working on by holding a fluorescent tube near or touching the contacts to the antenna. CB radio rigs with illegal linear amps would really light one up. ^_^
TDD
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On 02/12/2014 07:17 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

<snipped but read>
Back in the 60's when I first got my ham ticket we'd always hear Loran
I figured that now with GPS it would no longer be used, but a quick Google search shows it's still in use.
Sure liked those old days of vacuum tubes.
A friend of mine picked up a couple of WW-II radar sets and converted them to 1296 mhz transceivers. In 1965 that was quite an advanced project.
As to finding high-voltage arc-overs. I still recall watching TV at a friend's house and him telling me that his dad had to put a glass ash tray inside to prevent arcing over!
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There's not near as much Loran left as there used to be. Here's a video of what happened to the tower I used to hang out under at LorSta Port Clarence...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u92YYdy6Lak

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On 02/13/2014 03:02 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Nice way to take down a tower.
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Yep. The T building that they "missed" is where I spent countless hours during my year there. There was a 1/4 mile enclosed walkway from the station to the T building. Call it an above ground tunnel. We had a couple of old bicycles with big baskets as wide as the handlebars for carrying parts to and from. There were a few lights along the wall so it wasn't pitch black in the tunnel. Dark, but not pitch black.
One day lightening struck the tower and started a fire in the antenna coupler inside the building. It also killed power to the building which took out the lights in the tunnel. There was an small emergency light at each end of the tunnel but for the most part the rest of the tunnel was now pitch black.
When the alarm went off, being young, foolish and dedicated, I jumped on one of the bicycles and headed for the T building down the long dark tunnel. Those were my babies and I had to save them. Since I couldn't see anything except for the faint light at the end of the tunnel, I leaned the big basket against the ice covered wall and pedaled as fast as I could. I had walked the tunnel so many times that I knew there was nothing to hit so I just kept peddling as the light faded from behind me and kept going until the light at the other end allowed me to see again.
I made it to building, grabbed a fire extinguisher from the front room, felt the door to the transmitter room for heat, opened it slowly, went in and emptied the CO2 into the antenna coupler. My heart sank as I saw the burnt mass of copper tubing and ceramic resistors. Antenna couplers _never_ go bad, so no one keeps a spare on site. I knew we would be off air for at least a week. If a station is off air for more than one minute per month, you have ruined a "perfect month". We had just gotten an award for 6 straight months of zero off air time. The run was now over...big time.
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wrote:

Weren't those 4CX1000 tubes?
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On 2/12/2014 10:13 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

The computer engineers had to replace tubes in those beasts on a daily basis. ^_^
TDD
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On Tue, 11 Feb 2014 19:43:37 -0800 (PST), JIMMIE

Buy a proper hardwired UPS and the transfer is automatic.
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On 2/11/2014 10:43 PM, JIMMIE wrote:

with all on is less than 100 watts. What I want to do is to be able to connect my light circuits to the UPS during emergencies like this ice storm that is coming up. Not worried about heat or the fridge, I have gas heater backup and not enough in the fridge to worry about. Are there approved ways of connecting in the UPS that does not involve adding a transfer switch. I was thinking about doing this with outlets and plugs so I could unplug the light circuit and plug it into the UPS.

I like your concept. I would also like to keep my own lights on during power cuts. My best advice is to invest in a couple flashlights and wick lamps and some bottles of ultra pure. It will not be as convenient, but it will be dependable and provide a bit of heat.
I've heard of people stringing Christmas lights around the house, run off a UPS or battery and inverter. provides a bit of light for walking around.
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Christopher A. Young
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Great idean! I think hospitals have dedicated outlets indicating 'normal' vs 'ups'. Our electronic lab used to have clearly labeled outlets side by side, like four instead of two, with the right half shown as a color difference indicating the supply was from a UPS. Purpose was for powering PC's and instrumentation performing life tests, to prevent a lifetest dataset being ruined by an outage.
When I worked in the Security Industry, the UPS backup was specced to last four hours minimum, industry standard at the time. You have NO idea how difficult it is to power 120W for four hours without wanting to go to an automobile battery, which wasn't allowed, but I did use a vehicle battery on our internal backup system to power the PBS phones for the company.
You could use two battery packs, a generator to charge one while using the other, and pretty much run for days. However, don't know how many UPS systems allow you 'hot insertion' of a battery pack.
Another option of simple lighting, is to get those security lights that turn on when power goes off. Great indicator of whether the power went off, or on, and they're self-contained.
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On Wednesday, February 12, 2014 8:35:50 AM UTC-5, Robert Macy wrote:

I don't think what he's stated is a great idea.
"I was thinking about doing this with outlets and plugs so I could unplug the light circuit and plug it into the UPS."
That sounds to me like he's not talking about plugging a couple floor lamps into the UPS. If that's what he was doing, he wouldn't be here. It sounds to me like he wants to take existing light circuits in the house and put a plug on them so he could plug that circuit into the UPS. And that sure isn't kosher.
I think hospitals have dedicated outlets indicating 'normal'

Yes, he could do that, provided it all complies with code. I suspect the first problem is that it sounds like he already has a garden variety UPS for use with a PC, etc and they have outlets, ie they aren't rated or designed to be hardwired.
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On Wed, 12 Feb 2014 07:11:13 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net

Your comments of following code, absolutely agree with!
Not because of fear of prosecution etc, but over time these codes have come about due to some kind of accident. They represent a 'learned' history of errors, thereofe learn from them and follow code.
Therefore, implement the'function' you describe! sounds like an excellent idea. Just be careful, go about 'correctly' implementing that function.
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On 2/12/2014 8:35 AM, RobertMacy wrote:

Other than golf cart or marine trolling batteries, what were effective for power storage?
Wonder if it's possible to use a generator and car battery charger (off the 120 VAC generator socket) to charge up the UPS batter while the UPS is still powering lights?
I think the theatre and business power failure lights can be good. Be nicer if you could wire the internal battery to a big golf cart battery.
--
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On Wed, 12 Feb 2014 10:12:27 -0500, Stormin Mormon

Buy a UPS that supports external battery packs and you are all set - but they are NOT 12 volt units. Some are 24, some 36, and some 42 or 48 or more The external battery (extended run) units usually are higher voltage than the self-contained.
My powerware Prestige 1000 is 48 volts - 4X12 volt batteries, and the prestige 1000EXT is 60 volts - 5X12 volts. The external packs "generally" have their own chrging system.
10 minutes on internal battery, 42 with external pack at rated load.
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wrote:

From memory, the 12 Vdc 4 A-hr Powersonics batteries. Bruno, their chief engineer, taught me a LOT about battery chemistry and 'proper' charging and overall care of a battery.
Parbly changed a lot since then. Today, there's not much reason to NOT stick a chip in each rechargeable battery just to make everything a 'system'.
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Per RobertMacy:

Safety?
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Pete Cresswell

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On 02/12/2014 09:25 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Correct. Hydrogen and oxygen emission while charging.
Must use VRLA battery.
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TRUE! I once learned the hard way about how an automobile battery generates hydrogen gas during recharge! as in, BOOM! and no more battery, just acid running down through everything.
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On Wed, 12 Feb 2014 06:35:50 -0700, RobertMacy

Why change the battery to charge it??? Best Power had their "UBS" systems - "Unlimited Battery System" - a DC generator super-charger system that ran many police and emergency service dispatch systems through hurricanes, earthquakes, blizards, and anything else you could throw at them.
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