A little electricity 101 if you please

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Yes, even services from the fifties and sixties required up to six main disconnects

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Your main disconnects can be separate main breaker panels, or main fuse panels, or all six main disconnects can be in one panel

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And every house in America doesn't have six main disconnects. Most have only one, but the NEC allows up to six. and yes, they all have to say "main"

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I'm not saying that your panel, or any panel has to have a "main". I'm saying your service and every service has to have at least one main disconnect. It may not be in your panel. It may be part of the meter equipment, it may be on a pole, but somewhere, there is a means to kill the power to each service

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On Sat, 10 Feb 2007 22:09:00 -0500, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

The house my grandparents used to live in was built for few if any 240V loads. Several were added later (stove, dryer, window air conditioners, 2 electric kilns). Each one added a disconnect box on the wall next to the meter. It looked more like 10 of them than 5.
I can't check since that house has since been rewired.

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Mark Lloyd
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On Sat, 10 Feb 2007 22:09:00 -0500, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

The house I'm in how has 2. MAIN on a panel inside, and one for the central A/C.
Strangely, a neighboring house which was built at the same time and also has a Square D panel, has no MAIN (and no double-pole breakers either).

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Mark Lloyd
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<...snipped...>
Isn't that more correctly worded as "no more than 6" ?
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf.lonestar.org
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That wording may imply that none are required
wrote:

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this)@optonline.net> wrote:

OK, how about "at least one, but not more than six" ?

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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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It's all coming clear to me now
wrote:

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On Sun, 11 Feb 2007 12:09:19 -0500, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

If you have a very small service that's only for lighting a 10-square-foot outhouse, that may just need one breaker BUT YOU MUST STILL HAVE SIX MAIN DISCONNECTS :-)

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On Sun, 11 Feb 2007 12:09:19 -0500, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

The number required is equal to the maximum load in amps, divided by 30 and limited to six. For loads not over 15A, the required number is 0. This is because the authorities don't care about fires in such small buildings :-)

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On Sun, 11 Feb 2007 15:29:40 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry) wrote:

"Allowed up to six main disconnects"?
Yes. I did find that other wording strange. The first time I saw it, I thought it was saying that some services REQUIRED that many (like they'd be illegal with only 5, even if that shuts off everything).
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>>> When in doubt... Throw the main >>> >> Assuming your panel has main that is.... >> >> RBM wrote: > By code, it has to have at least one > That is simply untrue. Any service can have up to six mains switches, fused pull outs, or circuit breakers. Any single panel can have two separate disconnecting means each controlling only a portion of the panel. -- Tom Horne
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Ummmm.... "one" is included in "up to six". RBM's point was that "none" is not an option permitted by Code.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I haven't seen this mentioned yet, and wait for others to confirm before you attempt repairs. If you touched your voltmeter to the wires on the dimmer, I wouldn't expect to see any voltage at all. The two wires there are the load side of the circuit (black wire) and you won't show voltage there. You need a neutral or ground to complete the circuit with your multimeter.
In some houses, touching the metal box provides a ground. Something I do is to plug in an extension cord and use the ground portion of the plug (having tested it for polarity and ground) to complete the circuit, along with the switch.
If you weren't touching both wires to the switch, but the power pigtail and the neutral pigtail, then nevermind.
--
charles

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In article
snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.netttt (Charles Bishop) wrote:

That depends on whether the dimmer is on or off -- if it's off, I'd certainly expect to see voltage between the two terminals on the dimmer, wouldn't you?

The circuit is completed through the light bulb(s).
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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