A/C evaporator location

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The alt.hvac snobs wouldn't answer my question, so I'm posting here...
I was going to install my new humidifier this weekend, but I see that the A/C evaporator is in the way. And I have no room on the return plenum. I have an upflow system and the evaporator was installed at the very top of the supply plenum.
Here's a diagram:
``````````| ducts to all of the rooms | ``````````+-----------------------------------+ ``````````| | ``````````| | ``````````| | ``````````| A/C evaporator located here | ``````````| | ``````````| | ``````````| | ``````````+-----------------------------------+ ```````````\\ | ````````````\\ | `````````````\\ section of duct | ``````````````\\ | ```````````````\\ | ````````````````+-----------------------------+ ````````````````| / ````````````````| / ````````````````| section of duct / ````````````````| / ````````````````| / ````````````````+-----------------------+ ````````````````| | ````````````````| | ````````````````| | ````````````````| furnace | ````````````````| | ````````````````| | ````````````````| | ````````````````| |
I have some questions about this...
1) Should the evaporator have been installed lower in the supply plenum? (It sure would have made it easy for me to install my humidifier.)
2) I plan on having my A/C system replaced this spring, because it is very old and doesn't work well. Can I ask the installer to locate the evaporator lower in the supply plenum?
3) There is a little bit of asbestos tape on the duct where the evaporator lines enter. Will the A/C guys remove this? Will they ask for me to have it removed before they work?
4) Depending on the answer to #2...Can I have someone evacuate the A/C system so that I can remove the evaporator and install my humidifier? There's at least two feet of duct below this (and above the furnace) where the evaporator would fit.
Mike
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Good idea.

Bad idea. Caulk the house instead, to lower vs raise your fuel bill.
Nick
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Nick in his ultimate wisdom thinks caulk is always the answer, to bad he doesn't live in own home were added humidification is necessary.
Just as funny-sad is when he used to recommend flooding your basement floor or removing steam radiator air vents for humidification.
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It's the best one. Houses that need winter humidification leak too much air.

Never done that. What are you smoking? :-)
Nick
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m Ransley wrote:

in what he says -- leaking your warm, humidified air to the outside and replacing it with cold, dry air which you then heat (lowering its relative humidity) _will_ boost your need to humidify.
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You need a new furnace. Get it replaced now. Do it right once and for all. Get a pro to do it.
Start the payback period of a new system now. Don't put off what is needed.
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Why do you say that I need a new furnace? I was asking about the A/C system. My furnace works just fine.
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Surely you aren't going to put a new air conditioner system on an old furnace?
New furnaces are ~92-94% efficient. Furnaces that are older than about 12 years old are only 65% efficient at best.
Yes, you need a new furnace. Don't half-ass it.
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Oscar_Lives wrote:

humidifier.
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Mine is hooked up on a return with a new duct fed from the supply, same as yours, an upflow
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Yes, but I have zero room on the return plenum to mount the humidifier; it is too close to the wall. There is a nice big spot on the supply plenum, but like I said the A/C evaporator is in the way.
And, yes, I will also be having the A/C replaced this spring.
What I was considering doing was to remove the A/C evaporator (no, I wasn't going to disconnect it, just pull it out of the plenum) and install the humidifier. The HVAC tech would have to remove this anyway to put in a new one. But this assumes that the evaporator can be installed in the plenum below.
Mike
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On 10 Dec 2005 12:16:27 -0800, upand_at snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Keep in mind, junior............when you install a water producing appliance (IE: humidifier) on the supply plenum it is just amazing how that water is attracted to that expensive circuit board below in your furnace like a magnet. That doesnt happen if its on the return plenum. Bubba
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Bubba wrote:

You're just _full_ of baloney, aren't you?!
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You must be senile ol Nick, everyone kicked your butt on your " Keeping the basement floor wet for humidity recommendation"
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On Sat, 10 Dec 2005 15:16:57 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

I remember that one too.
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Do high efficiency furnaces really pay off ??? From what I have seen in newer high effiency hvac equipment the cost savings thru higher efficiency are offset by the higher repair costs.....
You can look on the internet and see many many stories of furnaces that have to have the igniters replaced yearly or bi yearly....flame sensors need cleaning...... heat exchangers needing replacement after only a few years......newer equipment doesnt last like the old stuff did.....then you have your hvac companies who spend as much time on parts replacement or new equipment sales training for their technicians than on real trouble shooting and maintenance training.
I still see old williamson, carrier, lennox, janitrol, bard furnaces.....all brands that were installed 30-35 years ago still kicking along every winter...good tight heat exchangers...they might require service every few years...usually a thermocouple...if even that....seems withn the newer equipment its something every season....inducer motor bad, flame sensor dirty, bad board......
Today the only way you can expect your furnace or ac to operate right is to have a maintenance agreement with an hvac contractor...this offsets savings even more...and then you might be unfortunate enough to get saddled with a maintenance outfit that requires its employees to sell so many parts a month...which is quite common....
So....really....Is a new high effiecincy furnace or ac system really gonna save anyone money.....
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Corny, You're such a fuckin tight ass idiot its not even funny. Nothing like working for the gas utility company. Everything is free and you can screw off, sit in your truck or play with your pud all day long and no one cares. Why should they? All of the paying utility customers are paying for you to sit on your ass and do nothing. No we are paying your retirement program to sit on your ass. Life must be sweet to be such a leech. Bubba
On 10 Dec 2005 15:41:33 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

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I dont work for the gas company, I work for a mechanical contractor whos major line of business is maintenance and repair of industrial hvac equipment. We also do some commerical type work as most of the plants we work in also have office areas with their own hvac related systems.
I did work for the local utility years ago when utilities actually did repair work...for the most part now your local gas man sets meters and hunts leaks...everything repair wise is subbed out to the local hacks....
I know it is odd for me to sit here and knock the very business I make my living at but I have watched the residential hvac business over the last 25 or so years turn into a parts changing or change out the equipment all together business...technicians being taught how to sell the customer on new equipment..technicians being told they need to push at least X amount of dollars worth of parts a month...bonuses given for parts and equipment sales to customers whether they need it or not....technicians being paid flat rate.....this all leads to technicians who become parts changers and salesmen.
Im not saying all hvac companies are like this but quite a few are and like other repair oriented businesses you just have to be carefull.
As for equipment....anyone in the hvac biz knows thay equipemnt manufactured years ago far outlasted and is currently outlasting in some cases anything on the market built today. Manufacturers are running lean now....they produce an inferior product to keep up the ever increasing profits demanded by upper management and stock holders.....I see equipment on a daily basis that is 30 years old...sometimes older that is still running and has ran good for all those years with minimal maintenace and repair costs...I also see new junk on the market that gets torn out and ends up in the landfill after 5 years...its sad but true.
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On 10 Dec 2005 17:38:38 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Your story is still crap. You talk out of both sides of your mouth. You knock the business that you made a living at and now you knock the hvac guys for what you know nothing about. Incase you havent noticed, the techs arent causing the demise of long lasting equipment. Customers want units cheaper and cheaper. Why do you think Goodman is so popular? Why do you see more and more of it in million dollar homes? Because its cheap and thats what people want. That makes hvac equipment like VCR's. You clean em and throw em away. 30+ year old equipment works great but gas prices have warranted their replacement. You cant afford to run old stuff anymore. You cant sit there and burn the techs when its owners and management that run the show. You need to get out of your Ivory tower and look around once in a while. Bubba
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Right Corny, you da Clown, do you push the broom or hold the pan at work, My 93.5% Lennox has full 10 year warranty 20 on coil and I save 50% over my dinosaur that sounded like one too and leaked Co, It will payback 100% in 3 years, gives more even heat and as a bonus I got AC, amazing huh. Hey it even works unlike the old one. I even got a 4" media filter, and 1st humidifier all while saving 50% on Btu and 20% on Kwh. I bet you think the 80% er is just fine for everyone. But you rent im sure.
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