220v circuits

I was noticed at HD the other day that many of the 220v plugs were 4 wire. The only kind of plugin device I can think of that might need 4 wire would be a dryer. Any others come to mind?
thanks bill
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An RV that can plug into a 220 volt receptical.
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Ovens

wire.
would
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they are not 220v circuits they are 240v btw.
john
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<< I <was> noticed at HD the other day that many of the 220v plugs were 4 wire. The only kind of plugin device I can think of that might need 4 wire would be a dryer. Any others come to mind? >>
Lets turn this around: few 220V appliances, tools, or whatever these days operate on solely 220V. The majority of things these days have 110V controls, lamps, whatever, and therefore require a neutral wire. This trend has been ongoing for some time, so 3-wire plugs will likely be the uncommon type in a few years just like 2-prong outlets. $0.05 worth...
Joe
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(Joe Bobst) wrote:

True for many appliances -- but I have yet to see a 220V tool that has any 110V control circuits.
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On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 15:56:58 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Saw a 220V chop saw with a laser that was 110, but it used two separate cords. Also a lathe with lighted hood, but it was hard-wired and not plugged.
Jeff
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Electric dryer and electric range come to mind for residental applications. As far as the 110v clocks and timers go most ranges and dryers have always had them. The difference between the old three wire and the new for wire is that in the old set up the ground was being used as the neutral for the 110v part of the appliance. This setup used the ground as a current carrying conductor which could cause a problem if the frame of the unit wasn't grounded This is no longer allowed under code for new installations. On the 4 wire set ups you have a seperate ground and neural.
Bill
BTW the 30amp 4 wire is for clothes dryers and the 50 anmp is for ranges,
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That is a stupid design to have two cords. What maroon designed that??
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Electric range. The heating elements are 220V, but the clock and timer are 110 and thus require a neutral.
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Different configurations for different uses. The UEC doesn't want the wrong appliance plugged into the wrong circuit. Thus different plugs for different applications. A 220v four prong (different sizes for different amperage) 2 legs are hot, one leg is safety ground no-load carrying, and one leg is load carrying neutral.
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"Doug Miller" < snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com> wrote in message
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Zypher posted for all of us....

WTF is the UEC?
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