Neighbor Fence Problem/Question?? LONG!!

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One exclamation point suffices. Using more than one is often a sign of an unstable mind.
Seriously, you could have called city hall and had an inspector deal with this in half the time you've spent moaning and whinging about it on usenet.
You don't want suggestions, you just want validation.
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MICHELLE H. babbled:

When you install a fence, you get to choose who gets to view the pretty side. If he installed the fence then he can have the good side facing him. That doesn't make it "BACKWARDS". If you installed it then you were stupid for putting the good side away from you.
I'm glad you're not my neighbor.
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Art

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on 6/20/2008 8:51 PM Art said the following:

In places where there are zoning laws and enforcement, the good side faces away from the owner's property. Why should the person not fencing in the property have to look at the ugly side of a fence? Would you put the ugly side of a fence facing the street?
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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The last comment from "willshack" is EXCACTLY right!! In our city, the ZONING LAWS state that "whenever a fence is installed by a homeowner on private property, the smooth side of the fence MUST face your neighbors property, and the inside of the fence must face your property. Failure to install the fence this way is a CODE VIOLATION and is subjected to a DAILY fine by the city, until the fence is installed the CORRECT way".
So if I report him for this, he would would be in big trouble, and have ALOT of work to do. Because as I stated in one of my previous posts, he installed the fence backwards not only on the left side of his house, 108 feet, where our shared property line is, but he installed it this way in the back of his house as well, and that is about 75 feet long.
So basically it looks pretty stupid. On the RIGHT side of his house, he has about 108 feet long of 6' x 8' foot wooden spruce stockade fence, and this is facing the CORRECT way ( per our city zoning laws and codes ), with the smooth side facing his neighbors yard, and the inside facing his yard.
But on the LEFT side of his house where we share the property line, he has the 108 feet of 6' x 8' foot wooden spruce stockade fence facing the WRONG way, with the smooth side facing his house, and the inside facing our yard and house.
It is also the same way in his backyard, where last year he installed 75 feet long of 6' x 8' foot wooden spruce stockade fence. This is facing the WRONG way as well, as he has the smooth side facing his yard and house, and the inside facing the woods.
So if we wanted, we could get him in trouble for not obeying the citys zoning laws for having the MAJORITY of his fence installed the WRONG way. But as someone said in another post, how would this solve the problem of the 24-25 foot long, 10 1/2 to 11 inch wide, 18 to 19 inch deep trench/ditch that he dug there on the property line which is our main concern anyway.
Even if he turned his fence the correct way, and faced the smooth side of the fence toward our property as the city zoning laws state, the trench/ditch is still going to be there.
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on 6/21/2008 9:15 AM MICHELLE H. said the following:

Well, if the fence was installed wrong according to your local zoning law, then the zoning department probably was never contacted before installing this fence, because they would have told him the right way to face the fence, and how far from the property line he could install it. Additionally, there probably would have been a permit required, which would be followed up by an inspection for compliance. Ask the zoning department for the distance from the property line that a fence can be erected (it's called 'setback'). He may be in violation of that code too. When I installed my fence in 1986, the minimum setback distance was 6 inches (I added a couple of inches to that to make it 8 inches from the property line). The current revised code is 3 feet. I don't have to move my fence because it is 'grandfathered' to the 1986 code. He may have to remove the whole fence, posts and all, to comply with the setback code. Good luck.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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MICHELLE H. wrote:

So report it already and quit whining.
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Art

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willshak wrote:

In my experience, and I am no fence expert, along the sides and back where it borders on a neighbor's property, the good side generally faces in towards whoever installed it. The street side is different, there the good side faces the street. At least that is std practice where I live.
I would be surprised if any zoning laws or codes address which way a fence faces. I could see where that could be a real can of worms with some fences, where it's more a matter of opinion which side is the "good side."
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Art

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It's not at all unusual for municipalities to have ordinances which specify many things about fences, from setback, to max height, where they may or may not be installed, (ie not permitted in front yards, but OK in back), etc. And most definitely it's not unusual for it to include something about which way the finished side faces. Which only makes sense, as if you want to put up something it's only reasonable that the side everyone has to look at be as good as the side the person putting it up sees.
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Is it a "wiffle-ball", is it 3 to 4 times a year, do you really know everything that is going on with your children. Your other descriptions don't add up, so exaggeration is assumed, so it can be assumed that you minimize the actions from your side. You need to assume responsibility for you and your children, and need to be honest with your descriptions. Your neighbor seems to be overreacting and this is escalating into a battle. Meet with him and settle your augments like adults. Fence in your backyard to contain the children's games, to prevent them from spilling into his yard. His garden is not intruding into your yard.

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No "COME ON". Kinda depends what's in the garden at the time, like new sprouts just seeing the sun for the first time. It probably escalated from there, to an over-protective gardener. Maybe a recluse responding the only way he/she is comfortable with. I don't know, just hearing your side. Sounds like something that could be worked out locally, but, it also sounds you've never addressed your neighbor personally in an amiable manner. Just an irritant to you that you can't kill with your bug spray.
And the factual data about the so-called ditch vs. the amount of topsoil you and your husband used to fill the ditch in is so bogus... And, you acknowledged that the ditch was on his property. All of which you snipped out in your previous reply of course.
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Dave



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On Jun 20, 12:44am, "Dioclese" <NONE> wrote:

Another good point. The ditch is supposed to be 2 ft wide, by 2 or 3 ft deep and with three 8 ft fence sections, it must be about 24 ft long. That's 100 to 124 cubic feet. You sure can't fill that up with 20 bags of topsoil. And with the ditch 2 feet wide at the property line, the fence 4" from the property line, the whole geometry of this doesn't add up.
And, you

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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

How long is it going to take you guys & girls to figure out someone is "pulling your chain"? :-( Tom J
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Tom J said:

It's a webtv user. They can't figure out how to use a computer to access the net(s). How can you expect them to judge the size of a ditch? ;)
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Eggs

A: Top-posters.
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wrote:

Right. And if you read one of Michelle's replies, she mentions deer on the property. Must be awful low fencing for both parties. Zoning laws in typically almost rural areas aren't typically enforced. Mostly live and let live attitude. I got back here to find she hung herself with BS.
Always wondered why Microsoft's freebie Outlook Express top posts replies by default. And, why they never offered a fix for typical newsgroup users. Doesn't sound difficult in the least.
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Dave

We have a right to choose.
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The solution is simple. He was supposed to install retaining wall blocks or timbers to shore up the land cut before installing the fence.
Tell him you'll clear out the soil you installed and leave him a level base where he can install the appropriate support.
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Yes, It will rot.
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