market for old lawn tractors?

Just curious, but is there much of a market for used lawn tractors? I occasionally see an adv. but I don't know how to price it. I have a 6 year old Craftsman tractor mower I got at Sears. It has a 48" cut- it was one of the better models at the time. It's engine clock is at 195 hours and I've been doing all the required maintenance- religiously.
I don't know if 195 hours on such a machine is considered a great deal? How's that compare to a car- that is, is it like a car with 100,000 miles on it?
I think I paid about $2,300 for it. I have a house sale contract in effect- that property has a 3 acre lawn- not sure if the prospective buyer has a mower, though I'm just asked the broker to find out. If he doesn't have one I'm sure he'd like mine- but I'd like to get the max. price and have no clue.
Any suggestions on would be appreciated.
Joe
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I have a copy of a general guide somewhere - it says something to the effect that a tractor like yours (not a JD, Wheelhorse or other premo) loses 50% the first 2 years - but I forget the percentages after that. If I was buying a 3 acre lawn I would either contract for the lawn care or buy a Z because they are so much quicker. But I have found there is a buyer for everything - in this case it would not be me.
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Joe,
A few years back I was trying to figure out why the John Deere dealers LX series lawn tractors with a 42" deck were priced at around $2,000 more than the John Deere LT models with a 48" deck sold at Home Depot, when the specifications, except for the engine manufacturer, were fairly similar. The moderator for lawn mowers/tractors discussion group at the Consumer Report site said that the Briggs and Stratton engines on the LTs are typically tested for 250 hours while the Kawasaki is tested at around 400. In other words, you should expect a longer life span from the LX than the LT. Also, the LX was had a stronger deck and it was the deck that typically failed before the engine. Made sense to me and helped to justify the higher price.
So, I'd day that there's a few good years left in your Craftsman and the new buyer might be interested if they don't already have one. If you don't need it where you're moving, then it's more of a liability to you to keep. You may just want to throw it in to sweeten the deal.
John

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on 7/28/2007 11:41 AM JB said the following:

Did the engines fail at those hour limits, or was that just the time that they cut off the testing? If the latter, there is no way to determine the lifespan of the engines.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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I've seen those John Deere mowers at Home Depot and they look like junk- compared to my Sears Craftsman which has been a fine mower. It has a very heavy duty deck- which "floats" on 4 wheels- those JD at HD have flimsy looking decks by comparison.
My engine is---- can't remember- but it's a German brand which supposedly is a very good engine.
I realize machines depreciate quickly- so I don't want more than it's worth- it's just that I have no sense of the market.
Joe

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$750 would be a fair price.
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OK, thanks- that's what I needed- somebody to give me a number- interesting that I told my real estate broker to tell the buyer $800. If he wants it, he'll probably come back with a lower offer- I might settle for $700 but not much lower. It's a good machine in good condition- and, I can throw in a nice, large cart with it too.

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