irrigation system puzzle

Last fall I extended my irrigation system by tapping into the main supply line and creating a manifold with three solonoid valves and one "direct" line with a manual valve. I ran an additional line to the rear of my property for an "always on" hose spigot. I didn't hook it up over the winter. Each of the irrigation valves work well.
Now that we won't be getting any more deep freezes, I hooked up my "always on" valve to the line running to the spigots.
To my surprise and puzzlement the pump will not supply water to this line unless one of the irrigation valves in the manifold are open. I don't understand this. The valves are "downstream" of the direct line and should not have any affect on the valve that is tapped directly into the main supply line.
It seems to me that when the manual valve is open water should flow out of the valve to the spigot. Tests have shown that water will flow freely to the spigot when hooked to a garden hose.
I am puzzled why the pump won't come on when the manual valve alone is open and only when one of the irrigation valves in the same manifold is operational. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
Jackson Chesapeake, VA
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Does the pump come on automatically, as on a pressure switch, or is it turned on only when an electric valve is turned on? Many pumps used only when the irrigation is on are turned on by the irrigation controller. If you look in the controller, where the valves are wired in there may also be a terminal marked "MV" or "PS". These stand for master valve or pump start. This is a 24V circuit that is on at any time there is demand for a valve to be on. They are then wired into a 24V pump relay that turns on the 110V or 220V pump.
If you do have such a set up, are all of the valve circuits in use on your controller? If you have some extra valve circuits not in use, if you were to turn on a circuit that does not have a valve connected, that should turn on the pump and give you water to the manual valve. As and example, if you are only using 10 circuits on a 12 station controller, if you were to ask the controller to manually turn on station 11 or 12, that would turn on the pump but not a valve. That would allow all of the water to go to the manual valve. The thing you want to watch out for is that you do NOT turn on the pump without the manual valve being open. Let me know if this is how your system is set up.
DP
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D. Thanks for the input. It makes sense and I will look at the set up when I get home tomorrow. But... I believe that I tapped into the supply line that also supplies a regular faucet that turns the pump on when I open the outside valve. This faucet is not connected to the sprinkler control valve, but it is just like a regular garden hose faucet.
I am not sure about this, there may be two seperate waterlines coming from the pump. I have to check this out. If this is the case, two lines, then I think I can solve my problem by tapping into the one that goes to the outside spigot for my extended spigots and bypass the manifold set up. Something to do after work tomorrow. Thank you very much. Jackson

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Just back from an expedition under the house. Yes there are two lines coming from the pump. One is controlled by a valve, so I need to change my set up and tap into the other line. I would not have figured this out by myself. Thank you for pointing me in the right direction. JD

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