Huge wasp nest - help!

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Put a rag with some gasoline on it in a tin can and crush it semi-closed. Put that in the plastic bag. Toss in the nest, and seal. Use a clear bag so you can see what's going on.
Steve
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Some years ago we had a wasp nest under the eaves of the second story of our house. I got a can of wasp spray that shot a 20' stream (can't remember what brand, but other folks on this thread have mentioned it). The wasps were dead or severely injured and abandoned the nest. Later in the Fall I knocked down the nest with a long pole. No HazMat suit required, no big deal.
Been there, done that. Dick in MN
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Dickr wrote the following:

You don't need a 20' sprayer or a ladder.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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There's no way I'm opening up that window, it's my bedroom window and I'm one of those people who likes their bedroom completely dark 24 hours a day. The bedroom windows are pretty much sealed off with a piece of fiberboard that's white on the side you see.
Lately the neighbor's kid has been volunteering to mow my lawn for a very reasonable price, next time he mows I may just stand guard over him with a can of jet spray and declare war on them if they start attacking. I think the nest was there (although I had forgotten about it) when he mowed a couple of weeks ago and they didn't bother him then. So I see no reason to "stir up a hornet's nest" as the saying goes until it's so cold they move out and I can remove the nest without worry. Like I said, they've taken up residence on the side of the house that I don't normally go around unless I'm mowing. I guess the main reason I'm apprehensive about this nest is because I've been ambushed a couple of times by yellow jackets that nest in the ground (and which are "evil incarnate" as one of the websites I was checking out put it) while mowing.
Many thanks to everyone who offered their advice, that unexco.com URL from RogerT was also very helpful.
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On Jul 11, 11:57 pm, snipped-for-privacy@dennism3.invalid (Dennis M) wrote:

the type that lives in the ground are nasty. a few years ago I sat on their nest:( I was planning in replacing a dryer vent hood.
it was a very bad day:(
to elminate the grond type use a LONG POLE to mark the nest entrance during the day.
at night with no lights put gasoline in a bucket, follow pole to entrance hole and dump in gasoline.
no need to light it, they are dead.
straglers will hang out in area for a few days so its best to avoid the area.......... but the hive is dead
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I got about 30 stings, its was a real bad dau i took the next day off work cause I felt so bad.....
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On Jul 11, 11:57 pm, snipped-for-privacy@dennism3.invalid (Dennis M) wrote:

That is the STUPIDEST way to go about it, and a great way to end up in the hospital.
You aren't going to be picking them off one by one like some fantasy anti-aircraft gunner. You are DEAD MEAT if you try to fight them off. RUN.
The best way to take out a large nest is with a simple garden hose and HOT water. Adjust the nozzle for the strongest jet of water, and hose them down. Hit them hard and hit them fast, and soak the nest until it falls off the wall. The hot water scalds them and they drown.
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In article
snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

Water would be just as STUPID, you silver-tongued devil. I don't have access to HOT water in a garden hose on the outside and I doubt if many people do.
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On Jul 13, 4:19 pm, snipped-for-privacy@dennism3.invalid (Dennis M) wrote:

Aren't most hoses rather long? Don't most inside faucets have threads that accept a garden variety garden hose adaptor? I _know_ that almost every house has a door or window.
I'm not weighing in on using hot, or HOT, water - I wouldn't (oops, I weighed), just that your nit-picking needs some other nits to pick on.
R
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Yeah, and how long will it take before the hose is actally squirting out *hot* water?
Even then, I'm not sure the water will be hot enough to really scald (versus annoy) the wasps.
Domestic water heaters are typically set somewhere in the range 120-140 degrees F. I'm guessing here but I reckon a wasp can withstand that temperature for at least a few seconds.

Not in modern houses, IMO. Sure, it was different 40 years ago.
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On 7/13/2011 4:06 PM, Malcolm Hoar wrote:

Well every washer hose is the same as a garden hose. Washers are fairly modern.
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Steve Barker
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Duh, you're right.
I still have serious doubts that the water will be hot enough to kill the wasps.
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Malcolm Hoar wrote the following:

You can get an adapter for a sink faucet that will take a garden hose connector. I have one. I hooked it to the kitchen sink faucet and screwed on the garden house to wash the Golden Retriever outside (warm water). The dog has since died, but not because of the adapter. :-)
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Most utility sinks have a faucet that will accept a hose connection as well, though a number of houses lack that type of sink. Also, I've seen dishwashers with hose type connections too.
As to the temperature of the water being sufficient, that depends a lot on how hot your water heater is set. Some dishwashers demand that the water heater that feeds them be set at a pretty high temperature. Many others have their own built in hot water heater to get the water temperature up to where it needs to be to thoroughly clean the dishes.
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most garden hoses will carry very hot water as long as the pressure is low.
like spraying water OK, using garden hose to replace a section of PEX as guaranteed mess
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On 7/13/2011 3:19 PM, Dennis M wrote:

everyone has a water heater and everywater heater has a hose connection on it.
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Steve Barker
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But there is only about a gallon of *hot* water there on the bottom before it runs pretty cool because that's the end that the water is replenished in. [BTDT- trying to melt some ice dams]
Jim
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sounds pretty bold to me. Suppose you're nervous while doing it, and screw up, and the nest falls into the room, or something.
I think for $125 or a bit more you can buy a professional anti-bee suit. Maybe even $200.
Also consider that these Africanized bees keep moving further north. Suppose you get a nest of those sometime?
Not that I'm about to try this, but my father, out in West Texas, when there was a yellow-jacket nest up under the eves of the house, would get a long pole, wire some newspapers around the end, light 'em, and with big flame going would quickly stick it up under the next -- all the yellow-jackets would fall down to the ground, and he'd stomp them dead.
And he'd do that in the middle of the day -- no waiting til night or early morning.
David
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David Combs wrote the following:

How long did it take for the fire department to get there to put out the house fire? And you said my idea was bold. Maybe so, but at least it was not stupid. BTW, the message you responded to is a month old.

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Jul 10, 7:22 pm, snipped-for-privacy@dennism3.invalid (Dennis M) wrote:

That looks easy, they are sitting ducks all exposed like that. (When it is hard is when they make the hive under a mushroom vent or behind something). I'd use the raid wasp spray, take aim, shoot, soak the hell out of it until they start flying out then just run into the house. Then come back in an hour for another application. Then come back in an hour with the garden hose and a nozzle that will give a needle pressue stream (the cone type for cleaning driveways) to knock down the whole hive.
Contrary to another poster they DO come back to the same location, but maybe not the same actual nest. They re-use my Weber Grill every year to start nesting, every spring I have to evict them, but there I do it by simply grilling them with the cover closed :)
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