Trane fan "On" for outside air?

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Running the A/C is removing heat from the area. Running a blower motor only adds heat to the area.
So YES, running the A/C is the better choice. Unless you like to waste money.
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Especially if your ductwork is in the attic!
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wCare to measure just how much heat a fractional horse motor would add? Still comes down to the difference between the cost of the fan and the cost of the compressor - fan wins as long as the house is at a comfort level.
Harry K
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A motor can add 1000 + watts (which is heat) to your home. That's HEAT, no matter how you cut it.
Running a compressor REMOVES heat, that's money well spent, if you want to cool your home.
I suggest you get a clue, before you start argueing over matters which you don't understand.
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wrote:

:Says another person who "I know what I know and don't confuse me with :facts!" You might be right about the south (I been there too damn :many years to ever want to go back), but I am not in the south. It :works up here.
Do some quantitative testing...run a graph on simular days with simular heat and RH, plot them with both A/C, and fan only, then come talk to me.
:The humidity level in a house will be about static whether you are :running that fan or not. The fan does not 'create' humidity.
Actually that is incorrect. The RH in a home is always changing, unless you never run water, you never sweat, you never cook, you never bathe, you seal up the commodes, have no house plants, or people or pets living there, then there is the residual condensate on the evap coils that gets put back in the air when running the fan only.
:So to your mind, running a fractional horse fan is more expensive than :running a multihorse compressor....uhuh.
If you have a new, high efficiency system. the cost to operate is negligible, and the comfort level is much higher. OTOH, if you have a system that is more than 20 years old, and your just trying to cheap out, then all bets are off. Either way, your the one that has to live with it, and *my* home is comfortable.
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OK if you want to nit pick. The humidity level is what it is when the fan turns on. Turning on the fan does not change it. Is that clearer?

So I can run a 'high efficiency" 3 hp motor at "minimum cost'? Wow! Glad to know that. And just how does that 'minimum cost' comapre to a fractional hourse fan motor that is ALSO in a 'high efficiency' system? BTW my system is less than 10 years old and yes it is a high efficiency model. Change out from a system that was probably built back in the 40s.

Well goody for you. Did you somehow miss that *my* house is also comfortable? It works for me and I prefer the comfort given with the fan to listening to the AC give the same comfort at additional cost.
Harry K
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Energy to run a motor is heat, no matter what you want to think.
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Keep repeating that why don't you? Meanwhile maybe you can point to where I said running a fan _doesn't_ add heat.
You are too lazy to try the experiment - no skin of my ass but why do you enjoy making a fool of yourself in public?
Harry K
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Keep repeating that why don't you? Meanwhile maybe you can point to where I said running a fan _doesn't_ add heat.
You are too lazy to try the experiment - no skin of my ass but why do you enjoy making a fool of yourself in public?
------------------
Leaving that up to you, Dumbass!
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This can be correct; the typical house in the US has 30% duct leakage. The ones Ive measured normally are much higher. So if the return is outside the thermal envelope (only testing can determine this and not visual) and it leaks (guaranteed unless the ducts have been sealed very well) or the supply ducts leak (also guaranteed) running the fan will pull air from the outside into your house. Or the closing of interior doors will make rooms go positive in pressure forcing air to the outside and the space with the return will go negative again this will increase infiltration/ exfiltration.
Andy
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It has nothing to do with the thermostat. What happens exactly, is dependant on the actual configuration of the HVAC equipment in your house.

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