Problem with Furnace Condensate Drain

https://netfiles.uiuc.edu/jmengel/www/furnace_drain.jpg
The above pic is a sketch of my situation. We are trying to sell our house and the inspector recommended that the above drain scheme was inadequate. We have had no problems, and the previous inspector (when we bought to house) did not cite this as a problem. So what can I do to fix this? My understanding is that the open trap in the crawl space is the major issue. The Tee off of the PVC furnace vent is a barbed hose connection that currently just drips into an open copper tube that slips into the S trap in the crawl. My proposal to fix this is to replace the copper with PVC that will be solvent welded to the S trap, and reduced and sealed to the barbed Tee off of the furnace vent. The top cleanout on the drain tee will also be capped. Thus the S trap will not vent into the crawl, and will rather vent into the furnace vent if needed. See the link below for my proposed fix.
https://netfiles.uiuc.edu/jmengel/www/furnace_drain_solve.jpg
Thanks for your help!
-Jon
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After some more thought, I believe that the following is more appropriate, and easier. Instead of running the trap to the PVC Furnace vent, simple extend the trap through the floor and add a floor drain to the top, letting the condensate drip into the floor drain. What do you all think?
https://netfiles.uiuc.edu/jmengel/www/furnace_drain_solve2.jpg
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Jon:
Why not ask the inspector (who is probably clueless) what he wants done to pass his inspection?
My personal solution would be to add a condensate pump and pump the condensate outside the house to a rain water conductor.
Vic Plank
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Are you some kind of wanna-be engineer?
I think you are a cheap motherfucker.
Call a plumber and take this post to alt.plumbing.
WHAT WERE YOU THINKING?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Building codes are regularily changed and updated every few years. What was once acceptable may no longer be.
In my state, the code stipulates one of three places for condensate drainage: 1) the tail piece of a sink, 2) a roof or floor sink, or 3) a dry well.
What do you think will happen when the water dries up in the trap that is connected to your sewer line?? Sewer gas in the furnace room. Yummy.
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I think
1) Ask the home inspector, and do what he says 2) you have too much time on your hands 3) Really great computer illustration. Wish I could do that.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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The trap at the a/c coil is meant to prevent air from being sucked in or blown out (air leak) thru the drain line by the fan. It should be deep enough to prevent the fan from blowing the water out of the trap.
Any air vent should be down stream from the coils trap.
The condensate drain should have a 'air gap' when going to a floor drain. (like your jpg)
GL Dan
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