Sedum? Now???

I'm in zone 7a according to the USDA zone hardiness map. We've had some snow, but it's been gone a while and the temps lately have been in the mid-40's to low 50's (day) and barely touching freezing at night.
Was out tidying up the yard and sucking up some errant leaves and found both my Sedum plants are sending up new shoots... LOTS of new shoots.
What's going on can't they tell time? Are sedum somewhat cold-hardy?
At any rate, I now have a couple pails full of oak tree leaves shredded by the leaf blower/shredding machine. Should I use this to cover the Sedum or just leave them as they are now - all cleaned up in a winter-bare bed and exposed to whatever Mother Nature throws on them?
Thanks in advance!
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Don't worry about sedums freezing out or dying from winter cold even if they're sprouting. They're tough. I raised sedum 'Autumn Joy' in zone 3, northern MN without losing it in cold, snow free winters. The one problem I had was that it blossomed in late August - early September, and the blossoms were often turned to mush from frost.
BTW, our weather has been incredibly mild in northern AR (zone 6). We were close to sixty today, and I sprayed my fruit trees, roses, and spider mite prone shrubs with dormant oil today. I even have some catkins starting to open on the pussy willow.
John
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Exactly to which "Sedums" is it you allude? You need to be more specific.
Sedum is a very large genus, even with the recent removal of many species to other genera, found throughout the Northern Hemisphere in arctic, temperate and tropical regions into Africa and the Andes of South America. So, it is impossible to generalize on their winter care.
Regardless of their origin, they are leaf succulents and should never be covered, even in winter.
I do suspect that your plants are actually deciduous Hylotelephium cultivars and not true Sedum at all. None-the-less, do not cover them. All the Hylotelephium are completely cold hardy.

snow,
to
both my

the
just
exposed to

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