Relocating a Woodchuck?

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Frank Logullo wrote:

I believe it's illegal here to relocate a wild animal -- it's a way to spread disease (like rabies) and parasites to a previously clean population.
Bob
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Just a thought... please don't drop it off at my place.
Hopefully, if you DO relocate th little pest, you will not be making a problem for someone else. That wasn't meant to be hurtful, it just occured to me.
Kate
| > Add Marmota monax to the growing list of urban wildlife. Anyone know | anything | > about the most humane way to deal with woodchucks? I've seen threads | elsewhere | > about relocating squirrels and other critters, so maybe someone here might | > know. | > | > Now, ordinarily I wouldn't care all that much if there was a woodchuck | living | > nearby, but one has decided to take up residence in my garage! (It's an | old | > garage with a gravel floor). I know where I can rent a live trap... is | there | > anything I need to know about relocating? (I know plenty of vacant/rural | areas | > I could relocate it to). Are they territorial, and are they able to dig | their | > own burrows quickly? | | A Hav-a-hart trap is a nice thing to own. I've captured and released | numerous woodchucks, squirrels, possums and raccoons from mine. I take them | to a nearby state park. I would recommend getting the largest trap (~$50). | Mine is next to largest and I had to give up on a big raccoon. If animal is | too big for trap, it will not close. Some may tell you that relocating the | animal may endanger it. Me: I don't care ;) | Frank | |
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (OhSojourner) wrote in message

A .22 to the head, quick, painless. Trying to relocate them is pointless.
J. Del Col
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J. Del Col wrote:

To anyone suggesting this: Out Of The Question for a number of reasons:
1. I live in an URBAN area with high population density. That is to say, the houses are all about 20-30 feet apart from each other. The buildings are so close together there's a good chance of hitting someone else's property if a gun were to be fired. (And you're suggesting I shoot a gun *inside* my garage?) Shooting a gun (even a BB gun) is illegal within city limits. I don't own a gun anyways, and buying one would be more expensive than buying a live trap. Also, doing this myself would probably be quicker and cheaper than hiring somebody.
2. I don't have the time or the patience to sit around waiting for the animal(s) to appear.
3. I have no worries about the animal(s) reappearing on the property if relocated a few miles away. There are so many cross-streets and busy city intersections in between, would take nothing short of a miracle for a relocated animal to return. (I live in a city with a population of 400,000, not out in the boonies.)
4. Rodents are not as likely to be vectors of rabies (FWIW raccoons and skunks are not rodents).
5. The places I'm thinking of relocating to are not near farms or private properties. There's a park in an area surrounded by commercial zoned, corporate/light industrial parks and an abandoned shopping center. Woodchucks and other wildlife have existed in this area for years; they come out in the open, and if they were a problem I'm sure someone would have done something by now.
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OhSojourner wrote:

I think you're exagerating about the BB gun, but in any case, submerge the live trap in a trashcan full of water, or take it to the lake or river and throw it in (with a rope tied on so you can pull it back), or call the city's Animal Control office and let them decide what to do with it after you've caught it.

You shoot it *after it's in the trap*.

That's a good point.

It still might have the flu or leprosy or cooties or something, and infect all the others that are currently living in the park.
Best regards, Bob
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Guns don't kill woodchucks, idiots do....

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Ask any cattle rancher or horse owner about woodchucks.
Unless you extirpate the beasts, they'll dig holes that can cripple cattle and horses. Either shoot the woodchucks or shoot the cows or horses after they break their legs. Your choice, ace.
J. Del Col
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snipped-for-privacy@mail.ab.edu (J. Del Col) wrote:

Don't forget to fill the holes anyway. If there is a groundhog, there are at least 2 holes.
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Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA http://home.earthlink.net/~rhodyman
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Yeah there's a slug of cattle ranchers posting to this thread.....
Actually the issue seems to be a pussy whipped husband with some delusions about not killing immediately, rather the illogical moving and slow death is preferred to continued whipping...
On 24 Sep 2004 08:12:23 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@mail.ab.edu (J. Del Col) wrote:

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It's a woodchuck, people. Not a great white. What's wrong with letting it go in a non-residential area? Is it more manly to shoot it in his furry little head? ::eyeroll:: The more people I meet, the more I like my dog.... Lori <--- not a PW'd husband

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Because releasing is certain slow death, but a good solution for the emotionally handicapped unwilling to take responsibility for their actions. Certainly shooting the poor creature in the head would be far more humane!
How about just letting the critters whose territory you moved into stay and learn to live?
On Sat, 25 Sep 2004 18:25:35 -0400, "Stunk Pidasso"

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ding ding!!! I think we have a winner!

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Once I understood that for every groundhog that was shot/relocated, a new one would move into the vacant (and lucrative for a groundhog) territory, I changed my strategy. I put up chicken wire fencing around the parts of the veggie garden that contain the most enticing plants. It act as a deterrent, but not an absolute barrier. I then bribe the hog by placing kitchen scraps it likes, such as melon rinds or corn cobs, at the edge of the compost pile, which lies between its main burrow and the garden. I employ negative reinforcement by running out screaming and stamping when I see it venturing near the garden. And I let the some of the drops from the apple tree lay on the ground to serve as fattening-up-for-the-winter food.
This year I lost two swiss chard plants and a good section of a row of peas to the groundhog. They are understandably hungriest early in the growing year. I admit to being annoyed about the peas, but not to the point where I was ready to do something elaborate like burying fencing or electrifying it.
Better the devil you know than the devil you don't.
Sue
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Not in Pennsylvania. In fact several friends called the Game Commission they trapped and relocated ground hogs onto State Game Lands. There they either lived a long lire or had a very sudden death.
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http://www.geocities.com/aliciainelpaso/wildgame/wgrwoch5.htm
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wrote:

Pretty funny.
But seriously what is the downside to having a woodchuck under the shed? That's where mine is. Other then eating my cantaloupes, and I guess some of my tomatoes and cukes.
Actually, I should say woodchucks as it seems that he's got a girl now. Will I be seeing little chucks next year? A chunk of chucks?
I don't mind all the rabbits and squirrels and chipmunks that are in my yard. I don't really mind the woodchucks either, but I don't know much about them. I do have some reservations about a herd of them.
I am surprised by how fast they are. Look like racehorses when they head for the shed.
Swyck
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And woe betide anything, such as a little kid, that gets between them and their burrow.
J. Del Col
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Heck yeah, who would want a little kid to learn anything about the natural world his phobic parents feel compelled to shelter him/her from!
On 27 Sep 2004 11:45:08 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@mail.ab.edu (J. Del Cool) wrote:

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Hell yeah, what's a dozen stitches and a tetanus shot, plus a hundred bucks for the ER visit? At least the little brat will learn to leave woodchucks alone.
J. Del Col
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When you sober up you need to stop hugging trees and get between a ground hog and his hole and see if you feel safe or threatened. I can guarantee you will feel threatened and never do it again and never suggest that other people do it either.
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