Pet Safe Vines?

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As some of you had seen I'd been working on a 34x34' dog run off the back of our house for our hounds.
I'm finished with the fence and am working on a deck section and 8 foot ramp that will lead from the house to ground level for the dogs.
Anyway, the deck is built with a height of 3', and a final height of 5' with the railing. The face side I'm going to use lattice which will go the full 5 foot height.
I'm going to put a vine on it, but need advice on what would do best.
During summer it gets part sun from 11am till dusk. Fall it's mostly shaded by the house.
I'd need something that is totally pet safe, just in case they decide to munch on it. I'm not sure which ones are as none of the sites seem to cover this info.
The more flowers, the better, but anything is good. I'm going to end up training what ever grows there to grow along the balusters of the full 8' ramp as well as on the 5' deck section.
Any advice?
Thanks in advance! :)
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Scott Hildenbrand wrote:

As a general rule, any vine (or plant) that has berries on it is NOT safe around pets. One safe vine that I would consider is Clematis. There are lots of varieties that will give you a lot of color and some nice foliage and there is almost no maintenance with them. It takes them a few years to grow and you need to pick the ones that are right for your area and situation.
Also, vines like morning glory (annuals) grow quickly and (usually) reseed themselves every year and they come in lots of colors.
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Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

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Bill R wrote:

So Clematis is indeed pet safe then.. Good.. It's one of the ones I was leaning towards using... Best thing about Clematis is you can easily train the main branch and prune the crud out of it back to the main without much problem.
Glad that you brought up Morning Glory, since I was hoping to grow some on the fence itself as well as some Cypress Vine so those two are good options for it then.
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On Nov 12, 9:28 am, Scott Hildenbrand

Both Clematis and Morning Glory are toxic to animals and people. Try this site
www.aspca.org/toxicplants/
Why not grow something you know is edible, such as berries or grapes? Emilie NorCal
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mleblanca wrote:

Thanks for the link, though it errored on load I did google for aspca toxic plants and pulled it up.
I see cypress vine is not on the list so puts it on the possibles.
As for growing something I know is edible, good Q.. I really don't have an answer for that one. Though I'm not sure I'd do grapes.. Will have to look into berries, so long as the plant doesn't have thorns.
Something else that came up was a Chocolate Vine, which seems to be 100% edible. Seems that it's considered a pest in KY however.
Purple passion flower seems to also be on the edible list, as well as Scarlett runner beans.. Anyone have experience on those three?
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Scott Hildenbrand said:

Thorns would pretty much guarantee the animals won't chew on the vines. ;)
[rest snipped]
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Scott Hildenbrand wrote:

<S>
Does anyone have any experience with Chocolate Vine (Akebia)? It's at the top of my list of possible plants for on the dog ramp which will be safe for them and edible for us.
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i grow scarlet runner beans. they're just an heirloom runner (vine), so nothing poisonous about them. the beans are good very small *or* full grown. there's a not so tasty week or so between the stages where thay're no good as shell beans & too tough for using like snaps. they also make good dry beans... however they *are* a very lurid pink & purple spotted combo. they turn green when cooked fresh, but the dry beans stay kinda pink/purple. hummingbirds like the flowers. they need a fairly warm soil to sprout, but they grow fairly quickly, not very branchy/bushy, so plant fairly close if you want coverage of the screen. purple podded string beans have similar growth habits & nice purple flowers (scarlet runner flowers are red & white). make sure you don't get the bush type on those. either one if you keep the beans picked, they keep growing & blooming until frost. lee
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No grapes around dogs. There have been a number of reports of fatalities in dogs with relatively small doses of either.

Which Passiflora species? At least some of them are toxic. (Sorry, I don't do common names well.)
Hops might be another possibility, but check on that one with veterinary toxicologists -- I'm unsure of that, but will throw it out as a potential. And there are some ornamental hops vines that aren't too bad looking.
Kay
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wild grapes. dogs dont really go for them. all our dogs eat grapes with no "toxic" effects. Ingrid

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snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote in

grapes & raisins can cause kidney failure in canines. toxicity varies from dog to dog, but the damage is cumulative. it is not wise to let your dogs eat grapes or raisins. lee
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enigma wrote:

Another problem with unprotected grapes is that, when they start to get ripe, they draw LOTS of birds. The bird eat and crap (a lot). The bird do-do carries many diseases that dogs can pick up by just waking through it.
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See Elwood and Whatling, 2006. Grape toxicity in dogs. Vet Rec. April 8; 158(14):492
Campbell and Bates, 2003. Raisin poisoning in dogs. Vet Rec 2003; 152(12):376
Penny, Henderson & Brown. 2003. Raisin poisoning in a dog. Vet Rec 2003 152(10):376
Singleton. 2001. More information on grape or raisin toxicosis. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 218(10):1555-6
etc.
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Kay Lancaster wrote:

Wow... Almost makes it seem like dogs can't be around anything.. I'm still at a loss of something safe to have around them..
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wild grapes are excellent, as is Virginia creeper. altho the birds do eat the ripe fruit, they usually fly away to crap somewhere else. the only time we noticed blue streaked poops was when we had a mountain ash and when it was ripe a flock of birds (the ones with teh yellow stripe on the end of the tail feathers) would show up to eat all the fruit. Ingrid
On Sat, 17 Nov 2007 10:24:20 -0600, Scott Hildenbrand

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All of the reports are anecdotal. From the last article given below: "The toxic mechanism remains to be elucidated, and the apparent lack of a reproducible dose response relationship has led some authors to suggest this may reflect either a component of the fruits that is present in varying quantities,or the existence of an extrinsic compound that may not always be present"
Our dogs have always eaten grapes and even raisins and lived to well past their "natural" life span. In the wild wolves eat grapes. They have not yet found any toxin in grapes, that is no "mechanism" of toxicity.
I find it interesting that there were NO reports of grape toxicity in dogs until recently. HOWEVER, we now know about all the toxins in the food on the shelves, toxins that cause renal and liver failure.
"Could you please tell me what the signs and symptoms of the melamine poisoning are in dogs?
A: Signs to watch for with a suspected melamine poisoning includes vomiting, inappetance, lethargy, urinating more frequently, and drinking more water. The melamine is a renal toxin and can cause acute kidney failure. In dogs who already have compromised kidneys, the symptoms are more severe. When the kidneys fail, they are unable to clear the proteins from the blood, causing nausea. Some dogs will vomit. Most will not be interested in their food. In attempt to flush the kidneys, the dogs will be more thirsty and urinate more frequently. If your dog is showing any of these clinical signs, we recommend having your veterinarian check a renal bloodwork panel and a urinalysis."
THE DIFFERENCE? my dogs eat a raw meaty bone diet bought from a local human food store. No processed, commercial dog foods, no melamine contamination, no aflatoxins, no grains, carbs etc that compromise their health.
INgrid

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Scott Hildenbrand said:
[...]

That depends solely on the variety. Some get cut back, at the end of winter, to 8-12".
Just pointing out that it's not always safe to generalize plants' care only by the genus. ;)
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Eggs Zachtly wrote:

True, true.. My miss-information there.. ;) I'll re-phrase that to most can take a heavy pruning.. :D
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Scott Hildenbrand said:

Just make sure, if you buy one, you get the one you're expecting. That's what I'm on about. ;)
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Bill R wrote:

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/consumer/poison/Ipomotr.htm
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[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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