Pear trees need a pair for pollination

Even without a partridge, a pear tree can add a special touch of beauty to almost any landscape. But, depending on your needs – ornamental or fruiting - you should do a little research before you plant.
QUESTION: “I have been told you need two pear trees to produce fruit. I just planted an ornamental pear, FLW Cleve Select. My neighbor just across the road was told if you have another pear tree within a half mile, that would work for the second tree. He wants to plant a pear tree. My question: will my ornamental work for his "second" pear tree if he plants a fruit bearing pear or does he need two of his own? Thanks for your time and help.” -- Mickey VanSickle
ANSWER: Ornamental flowering pears will not work to cross pollinate fruiting pear trees. When planting a fruiting pear tree, a second variety of a pear tree should be planted within about 300 feet for cross pollination. The two fruiting pear varieties should either bloom at the same time or overlap their blooming period. Otherwise, pollination will not occur.
QUESTION: “I have a Cleveland pear tree and half of the leaves are dead-looking and brown colored. Any idea what is causing this problem? Your help is appreciated.” – John Young
ANSWER: It sounds as if your tree is showing signs of stress. A few things that you will want to check are: Fire blight Freeze damage Frost damage Wind damage Over/under watering Borers Residue from chemicals sprayed in the area
These are probably the most common reasons for pear trees to show stress. You can narrow the list by eliminating any that you know definitely could not be responsible. When you’ve narrowed the list, you might want to take a sample twig or a photo to a garden center or better still, call your nearest Ag Extension Service, as they might be knowledgeable about any causes specific to your local area. If you need help locating your local Extension Service, drop me an e-mail.
QUESTION: “I am having a problem with some of my trees that I plant that die due to girdling. The root just goes in a circle and kills itself. What can I do to prevent this?” – Fran Imlay
ANSWER: For readers who are unfamiliar with the term, girdling refers to the tendency of the roots of some trees to grow tightly around the main stem of the tree and slowly restrict the movement of water and nutrients. As a result, leaves become smaller, paler in color and less dense.
One preventative action is root pruning and/or fraying out the roots of container-grown plants before transplanting.
Here is a link to very helpful online article from the University of Ohio Extension Service about root girdling: http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/1000/1139.html You can also click on a direct hot link to that article when you find this column at my Web site, www.landsteward.org
QUESTION: “I am wondering if you can suggest to me what to plant in my backyard that seems to be damp and moist most of the time. We are having three of our Austrian pines removed because of the drought last summer. We have been told they are dead. The area is in direct sunlight and the ground area seems to be damp due to a water drop off. What are some good trees or plants to replace in this area? We want something for privacy as well as beauty.” -- Vernice
ANSWER: Sorry to hear about your pines, Vernice. I suggest you take a look at the following trees that could be what you need: Maples, bald cypress and river birch. Something you might not have thought of: Growing bamboo and taller growing grasses in larger containers. They provide quick privacy and can be moved around as other plants begin to grow taller. Some other plants that I’d suggest for your backyard are Canna lilies, Nandina, Hibiscus and laurels. I hope this gives you some ideas to build on.
The Plant Man is here to help. Send your questions about trees, shrubs and landscaping to snipped-for-privacy@landsteward.org and for resources and additional information, or to subscribe to Steve’s free e-mailed newsletter, visit www.landsteward.org
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When planting trees this should be kept in mind:
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Many tree problems are associated with the following: They are Case
Sensitive.
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Hmm, the yard boy is responding to a professional. How quaint.
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You are a time waster among other things. Please harass someone else.
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Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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symplastless wrote:

Here is a case where both the Plant man and symplastless got it completely wrong. Ornamental Pear trees and Fruiting Pear trees are both the same cultivars, Pyrus. Some Pear trees are self-fertile, like Seckel. Other pear varieties will not act as pollinators for other varieties because of genetic differences. However, in your case, the Ornamental Pear should do fine. There is a very nice chart of which pear trees pollinate eachother at:
www.ext.colostate.edu/PUBS/Garden/07002.html
Hope this helps,
Sherwin
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Please show me where I posted regarding the female and male order of pear trees. I did not because I did not know. I did not write question and answer.

I did not write this.

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symplastless wrote:

You may have not posted the original question and reply, but you did reply to the email with your additional comments. However, you did not correct the original reply, so either you did not see it or you agreed with it. I tend to think it was the later. Do you just look for posting about trees and add your boilerplate without checking the contents?
Sherwin
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no, that is incorrect. My post regarding the care of fruit trees is here just as I posted. These are the basics. This information is a must for caring for fruit trees. Yes I do post Tree Basic information with respect to the care of trees.
--
Many tree problems are associated with the following: They are Case
Sensitive.
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