Peaches

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Well, my peach tree made a ton of peaches, all or most of which had worms in the center, and/or brown rot. The red admirals are drunk out there and I mean drunk and many thousands of them.
Anyway, I don't kill insects, but does anyone know of a way to prevent brown rot aside from proper hygiene after the growing season is over. Also, I was wondering if I can do an extreme pruning after all the fruit has fallen off. The tree is a good umbrella shape, but it is way too tall...about 14 feet tall. The raccoons get up in there and poop on my canopy to mark THEIR peach tree. I don't mind, but if the tree was shorter they can get to it without skating the canopy and maybe I can pick the peaches easier. Does anyone have any good book recomendations regarding peaches?
Victoria
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jangchub wrote:

I keep all my fruit trees pruned to ten feet tall. There are many guides to pruning but your best recommendations for fruit trees will probably come from your state agricultural extension service. If you're in Texas TAMU is your friend. If you don't spray at all you probably will never get a decent crop. I only use dormant oil spray in the winter and it has improved my crop greatly. Proper pruning will also help in letting light and air into the interior of the tree plus you will need to get rid of some of the fruit so others will get bigger. HTH
George, USDA Zone 9b, SW Louisiana
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jangchub wrote:

I'd love some advice on that too, we haven't had a peach in 2 years!!! The trees are strikingly beautiful when blooming though. :)

I'd wait until February to prune them. Let the leaves produce energy now.
--
Victor M. Martinez
Owned and operated by the Fantastic Seven (TM)
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On 7/13/2007 1:35 PM, Victor Martinez wrote:

If you are trying to grow something that does not grow in nature (a hybridized peach), then you must resort to some non-natural practices. I use a spray that combines dormant oil (which kills over-wintering insects and their eggs) with copper sulfate (which prevents fungus and other diseases). I spray this immediately after pruning and again just as the flower bud swell and begin to show red (and again if it rains within 48 hours after spraying).
Gather up all fallen fruit and trash it. Don't leave it to become a breeding ground for next year's brown rot.
Prune in the winter. If you normally get snow, wait until the buds swell slightly. In my area, I prune around New Year. Don't prune now; the tree is forming the wood on which next year's crop will appear.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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As with any pesticides, caution must be taken. http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/spring.html
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.

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wrote:

Do you know the chill hours on your peach? Mine is 400. Last winter we finally had at least or close to temps below 45 for 400 hours. Fruit trees, particularly peaches will show beautiful flowers, but if the chill hours aren't there the blossoms abort the fruit along with them when they fall off.

I agree, but peaches set fruit on new wood. So, my line of thinking was that if I cut out all the largest and oldest limbs I'd encourage new growth. Then, in February prune it back into the scaffold I have it pruned into now.
I'm going to go take a look at Dromgool's peach orchard at the store.
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An article in the Statesman yesterday about the impact of the rain had this: "....says Bill Psencik of the Psencik Peach Farm in Fredericksburg
"The foliage on the trees is so dense that we will have to do a lot of summer pruning to allow adequate sunlight to enter the inside of the canopy of the trees," Psencik says. "This can have a great effect on the amount of next year's peach crop."
So, apparently pruning in Summer is not a bad thing.

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wrote:

Yes, this is in line with my original thought to remove most of the old wood which will no longer produce fruit and cut it back hard. Summer pruning on fruit trees is very common.
Since the tree has given me brown rot for the last three years, and if it doesn't get remedy I was going to remove it and plant another on the other side of the property...well, I have nothing to lose. So, I will follow my instinct and cut it back and prune heavily so new wood will grow out for next years fruit. I made a mistake in my terminology, peaches fruit on second year wood, meaning whatever new wood grows this year, will be the shoots to produce fruit next year. The shoots are from 18 to 24 inches long and those (generally red in color) will be the shoots to produce next year.
I will also use a copper fungicide or something similar, but I will not use pesticides. I don't kill. That's that.
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jangchub wrote:

Actually, we all do. Whether we want to or not. :)
--
Victor M. Martinez
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All we have to do is look at our cars radiator. Then imagine what the radiators of the trucks that bring us our foods look like.
Bill
--

S Jersey USA Zone 5 Shade
http://www.ocutech.com/ High tech Vison aid
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On Sat, 14 Jul 2007 19:57:49 -0400, William Wagner

Which is why I usually use drive time to recite mantras. I also have a copy of a mandala that, if an animal sees it will not take another animal rebirth. One would have to be a Buddhist to know what that's all about. We sure do kill all day, but not with intention.
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wrote:

Well, of course we do ultimately. My Lama told me there is not an atom of space where you won't find a sentient being. So breathing kills bacteria and whatever else. Also, I've been told just under my armpit is a zoo! What a fantastic Lama I have :)
I guess I should have have said, I don't kill with intention. I don't eat any animals, and I am working toward being a vegan, though that is difficult to do when I have a livingroom full of Thomasville Leather! Then again, I did buy it 8 years ago, so...nah, it still isn't yard sale yet. It's that lifetime type stuff. I digress...
v
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jangchub wrote:

If they're in good condition, I could help you get rid of them. :)
Victor, mostly vegetarian but definitely not vegan.
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Victor M. Martinez
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wrote:

Mostly vegetarian? Vic, c'mon. Pregnant or not? :) At least eat a big animal which feeds many and try to avoid shrimp because many of those are killed. None of it is good for ME, but His Holiness says to at least eat a large animal which feeds many. He has to eat meat from time to time for health reasons and he eats large animals when he does.
You will be the first to know when I see the furniture. I'm already tired of it, but my husband will kill me! I won't even say how much this stuff cost us.
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jangchub wrote:

What I mean by mostly vegetarian is that I don't eat animal flesh regularly. Once a week or so, it depends. I'm not dogmatic about it either. I don't do dogma.

When I do purchase animal flesh, I choose, if available, those that are raised and killed humanely and as organic as possible. I do love shrimp though. :)

I don't see why anybody would *have* to eat meat for health reasons. The only essential nutrients meat provide are certain aminoacids, which are available from non-meat sources.

:) I'd love to have leather furniture, but with all our cats it would be impossible to keep it looking good for long. They are very good at scratching only on their furniture, but they do have claws and the do use them for traction when racing like wildebeasts in the Serengeti.
Cheers.
Victor, off to yoga
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Victor M. Martinez
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Not sure where this summer pruning is taking place, but heavy pruning in the summer encourages the tree to put out lot's of new growth, usually in the form of water sprouts that grow up vertically and our not desirable. Better to wait until the tree goes dormant in late fall or early winter.
Sherwin D.
cat daddy wrote:

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Are you giving this advice as specific to peach trees in Central Texas, or as a general rule of tree pruning? I would think the commercial grower would not do anything to jeopardize his current and future crop or orchard.

now.
had
canopy
of
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cat daddy wrote:

My time frames may be off slightly if the original poster lives in Texas, but the principal is still the same. Light pruning is ok in the warmer months, but heavy pruning will just encourage the tree to put out more growth. As I mentioned, this new growth will not be of a desirable nature. Heavy pruning should be done when a fruit tree is either entering or already is in a dormant state.
Sherwin D.
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I know, but not all the new growth will be in the form of water spouts and it will be the new shoots which will produce the fruit next year. I have nothing to lose by trying this rehab project. The tree is producing beautiful baseball sized fruits with rot. I may have to wait two seasons to really reap the benefits of doing this hard prune, but I truly believe it's the only thing I can do.
In the meanwhile, when the fruit trees go on sale in February I'll buy some and plant them in other spots.
wrote:

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jangchub wrote:

Why not wait until the tree goes dormant? You may have to trim off most of the additional growth the tree puts out because it is not growing in a favorable direction, that is straight up. Branches should go off at an angle for best fruit production.

Try and buy a semi-dwarf peach tree, or even a full dwarf for other fruits like apples. Then you won't have to hack the hell out of them later.
Sherwin

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