Peach tree

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Our peach tree, suited for our area, has not produced healthy fruit in three years. This year I gave it one more chance. I thinned the fruits early, pruned properly, cleaned up the area beneath the tree, fertilized it at the proper time and the fruit has the clear gunk on them, as well as it oozing out of the tree limbs. The fruit is not getting larger and is mishapen. At what point would you cut the tree down and plant another on the other side of the property?
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do a google search using the word "Gummosis" it will explain your tree problem
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On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 13:39:01 -0700 (PDT), beecrofter

The gum exudate is not amber colored, but clear and I can't find any obvious cankers. I also have or had the last two years a problem with brown rot. Most peaches had worms near the stone (these are free stone 'Dixieland' variety).
I have another spot where I can plant another tree so I'll do that this coming February. Too much problems with this and I have no intention on treating it if it requires fungicides. It may even be better to plant one out back where the animals in the yard live so they will stay back there and eat the fruit which falls, instead of coming onto the pool deck to eat the falling fruit. I hate to pick up the falling fruit because the butterflies get drunk on those rotten peaches! Particlarly the Red Admirals.
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Improper pruning starts many life threatening situations for the symplast of peaches. Improper mulching sets the stage for other issues that result in the effects you have acquired. All of the pesticides in the world will not fix problems associated with improper planting, fertilizing and pruning for peach trees. You also probably suffer from troubles in the rhizosphere. http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/RHIZO.html
1. What elements have you added to the tree? 2. Can you provide some pictures of the pruning cuts on the trees? 3. Did you prune the woody roots on the trees before planting? 4. Did you plant the tree at the depth the woody roots are coming off the trunk? 5. Was there wounds on the trunk when you bought the tree?
Many tree problems are associated with the following: They are Case Sensitive.
Unhealthy Trees from the Nursery / Improper Planting http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/T/tree_planting.html
Improper Mulching - http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/M/mulch.html
Improper Pruning http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/tree_pruning
Improper Fertilization (See A Touch of Chemistry) http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/CHEM.html
Tree Farming and Related Problems http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/SOUND /
Troubles in the Rhizosphere http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/RHIZO.html
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Consulting Tree Biologist www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss. Some people will buy products they do not understand and not buy books that will give them understanding.
wrote:

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Charlie Brown's teacher...wopwop wop wah wha whop bwaaaaaa.
On Sun, 22 Jun 2008 21:12:35 -0400, "symplastless"

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He's gonna get caught. Just you wait and see.

--

Billy
Bush and Pelosi Behind Bars
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Agian I will ask the questions:

--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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On Mon, 23 Jun 2008 17:31:21 -0400, "symplastless"

Again: Charlie Brown's teacher...wopwop wop wah wha whop bwaaaaaa.
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When the clear exudate turns amber look up gummosis.
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beecrofter wrote:

My Redhaven is 17 years old. It has given off amber exudate for several years now. However, it continues to thrive and produce lots of peaches. I don't think gummosis is the cause of his lack of fruit.
Sherwin
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Jangchub wrote:

Couple of questions. Is this a dwarfed tree? How old is it?
Sherwin
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wrote:

No, not a dwarf. The variety is a very low chill hourselection because we have such mild winters. I believe it is a 400 chill hour selection. We planted it (I think) five years ago. The trunk is about 10" in diameter and abot 12 feet tall, pruned in an upside down umbrella form. The first year it developed one peach, the second year we harvested 15 bushels of beautiful fruit. It hasn't produced healthy peaches since...for the last 2 or 3 years.
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wrote:

Here in NH (no lack of chill hours here!) when I hear of gung weeping from peach trunks and branches I think of peach tree borer and lesser peach tree borer.
See what our state entomolygist, and all around great guy, says http://extension.unh.edu/Agric/Docs/June19_08.pdf He has chemical and organic solutions.
Almost any insect infestation will produce weeping from the fruit. You can wade through Alan's newsletters http://extension.unh.edu/Agric/AGPMP/IPMNews.htm for lots of useful information.
John
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On Mon, 23 Jun 2008 18:16:59 -0400, John Bachman

Thank you, John. I will take a gander and when the foliage falls in the fall I will be able to better inspect the limbs for any possible problems with borers. Such a shame. This tree produced the most lucious, sweet, dripping juicy fruits that anyone on my block has ever eaten. Me included. I do think it's beyond treatment at this point. It is such a mess. I can't find any cankers, and in the fruits I do see holes and mishapen areas. Drat.
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Jangchub wrote:

My first thought that you had an old peach dwarf that has just reached the end of it's productive years. Not your case. My Redhaven peach is about 19 years old, and has ozzed sap for most of that time. It still produces abundant heathy peaches every season. Brown rot can be controlled mostly by good sanitation and removal of affected material. There are also sprays for that. Did you remove another peach tree in this troubled period? Although peaches are generally self-fruitful, they do better with another peach tree in the vicinity to help with pollination. By the way, which cultivar of peach do you have? Sounds like you are getting enough fruit though, but it is spoiling on the tree. The worms in the fruit could be codling moth or something similar. If so, you need to go on a spray schedule of insecticide, starting shortly after pedal fall, and continuing every few weeks until harvest. Codling moth is a difficult one
to control, so pick a strong spray, like Imidan to do the job. Just be sure to take the necessary precautions when using strong sprays, like protective clothing and breathing mask.
Hope this helps,
Sherwin
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PEACH trees are a C tree with respect to improper pruning and death of branches. If you do not understand that maybe you need to read MODERN ARBORICULTURE: http://www.shigoandtrees.com/Default.aspx People who speak about such trees should be required to dissect them.
The tree walls itself to death with the help of improper pruning, improper planting and improper fertilization.
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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On Tue, 24 Jun 2008 10:11:24 -0400, "symplastless"

BING BING BING. None of the above applies to my tree. Cuts are appropriate, fertilization is adequate, and I will probably never dissect a tree in my lilfe. Aren't you busy? Don't you work?
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wrote:

Then why do you have a problem? I thought you were the one with the questions? Lets see some pictures of these wonderful trees you care for.
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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On Tue, 24 Jun 2008 23:35:26 -0400, "symplastless"

Been there done that with you.
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You never showed me one dissection you did? Did I miss something?
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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