Opinion on hanging a swing

Ok.. I know some of you will wrinkle your nose at putting a swing in a tree but still need the info.
What do you think the better method is for attaching a swing to a tree.
1> Looped rope over the limb and tied. 2> Garden hose over said loop. 3> Use a closed eyelet screwed into the bottom of the limb.
Which would do the least harm to the tree.. Tree would be a huge pecan, on a 12-16" diameter limb.
I'm leaning to the eyelet as being the best for the tree and safest method. Only need one rope to swap out between a hammock chair and a tire swing.
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A swing hung from a tree is a great thing.
The first two choices will cause what's known as girdling - wearing away the bark and the layer beneath. Enough of this wear and it'll kill the limb. Definitely go for choice #3, and make it a really fat piece of hardware. I put one in the sycamore at my previous house 17 years ago, and the tree's fine. My wife at the time thought it would be good to wipe the eyelet with bleach so it wouldn't transmit disease into the tree. Hardware stores aren't known for harboring tree diseases, but she still went ahead with her idea.
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On 10/11/07 12:19 AM, in article 8vhPi.18794$ snipped-for-privacy@news01.roc.ny,

I think I'd have given them a good wash - maybe not bleach, but something to remove the oils and grease from manufacturing.
Wish I had a tree we could put a swing on.....
C
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Kewl, that's what I was thinking. Be really secure and the only damage to the tree would be the initial hole which it would heal around.
As Cheryl said, I would want to wash it down to get the bulk of the oil coating off of it.
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Found the perfect tree for a swing not far from my house on my property. Its an over 30' live oak. Said limb for hanging the swing is literally horizontal for about 10' and around 8' vertical from soil. I used the stainless steel eyelets, 1/2" with lag threads. I pre-drilled with 3/8" drill bit, just short of intended penetration of the eyelet screw. Hung a vinyl covered stainless steel chain with a vinyl lap seat for the swing seat. Its been out there for 2 years. Grandkids use it once in awhile. The tree shows no protest. Dave
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At the farm they've got a swing hung in the same way that's been there for 35 years or more now - you can't see the eyelets anymore, they're in the branch. But it's still strong enough for adults to swing on, if they're so inclined (I am - I love to swing, it brings me back to little girl days).
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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On 10/11/07 11:13 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,

A real tree swing sounds so good right now. Cheryl
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On Oct 10, 11:52 pm, Scott Hildenbrand

Eyebolt through the limb, fender washer and hex nut on the topside. Eye should be welded shut so it won't open under the weight of a heavy adult. Replacement part for a quality wood playset (i.e. Woodplay, NOT HD crap) would be best.
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wrote:

1/2" stainless won't open up. Mild steel with zinc coating may. My definition of heavy adult is 300 lbs or less. You don't want my description of an adult over 300 lbs. Again, I suggest 2 eyebolts. One for each chain.
Hex nut is to prevent eyebolt from walking out the limb. That won't happen if the limb is adequate, you don't predrill a hole too close to the diameter of the eyebolt thread diameter, and the threads are of adequate depth.
If you're talking wimpy 1/4", 5/16", or 3/8" hardware, or mild steel with zinc coating, sure, do it. None may holdup the mother-in-law, irregardless. Dave
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wrote:

Occurred to me you may talking about the all-thread version of an eye-bolt. If so, the longer threaded version of this (vs. a lag screw type) requires a nut/washer at the end of the threads and another nut/washer to snug it on the eyebolt side.
The lag screw type, if properly mounted and has adequate limb depth, won't turn while the swing is in use.
In either case, the material diameter of the eyebolt is the most critical so the eyebolt won't separate due to weight stress from the chain the swing is hung from. True stainless steel is stronger than mild steel with zinc coating. Dave
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In all cases, frequent inspection saves broken necks. Forged or welded eyes just let you sleep better.
You want to see real crap hardware, look at the wooden playsets at Walmart. 3/8" open eyed non-galvanized mild steel seems standard. HD playsets are a marginal improvement. Look at some of the other details -- steel corner plates will be under gauge and have rough stamped edges instead of being rounded over.
I worked at a company that sold Woodplay. Not an endorsement of that brand, just a few finer points worth sharing.
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