Oak Trees

I've been growing some Oak trees in pots for about 3 years now. They are doing rather well, but the time has come (I believe) for me to transplant them to a more permanent home. I'm not the greatest gardener in the world, so I don't have a great deal of experience in this matter. I don't want them to die due to my mishandling, as it has taken some effort to get them to the stage they are at presently.
Is this the right time of year?
Is there anything I should know before proceeding?
Does anyone have any experience in this area?
Are they old enough / too old?
Any ideas would be gratefully received. JNY
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On 23 May 2004 10:38:34 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (JNY) wrote:

Since they've been in pots any time of the year should be ok.

Make sure the taproot has plenty of room and make the hole big enough to spread the roots out, making sure none of them wrap around the root ball.

Yes, I've been trying to grow some oaks from acorns for a few years and finally had some germinate last year. Oaks don't like being moved, so make sure you want them where you put them.

Should be no problem as long as they're still alive. (snip)
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Not to go off topic to much, but in your area do they allow people to remove oak trees? Here in Southern, CA we can only trim oak trees. You need a special permit to remove one. Is it like that anywhere else?
Emil
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I live in the UK, and I've grown these trees from seek in pots, so there shouldn'y be a problem!
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I have read that most nursery people cut the taproot from oaks when planting to encourage a more fibrous root system. I don't know if I agree with this or not but I would assume the taproot is only important in areas with low rainfall or very windy areas?
I have also read that planting in the fall is best, especially in my neck of the woods because summer drought and heat can be stressful on a newly planted tree. In the fall, the tree would have time to put out new roots and settle in before cold weather and would have a head start for spring. However, I have also read that plants in pots can be planted at any time; I guess it just depends on your climate. Since you have more than one, maybe you could experiment. Good luck.
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figaro wrote:

Pruning the taproot of an oak is necessary only if you are planting a species native to dry-summer climates in a garden that will receive water all summer long, either in a climate with summer rains or in a garden that is regularly irrigated.

This is true except in areas with the most severe winter freezing. The prime time to plant any tree or shrub is when the soil is still warm but the air is cool. In my area, that is late October and early November.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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JNY wrote:

Plant them in the early fall, while the soil is still somewhat warm but the air is cool. This will encourage new root growth without prompting foliage growth. If you plant now, you might get more foliage than the roots can supply with moisture.

If the acorns were from trees growing naturally in your area, just plant them. If they are non-native oaks, you might have to do some special soil preparation.

See my <http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_oak_acorn.html

If you have a problem with rabbits or deer in your area, they are not old enough. Wait until they are saplings with trunks about an inch in diameter. Otherwise, you can plant them this year.

--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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(snip)

I've done that with oaks, but if you wait until they are that big the taproot will be pretty deep and will involve some extra digging. Here in the Ozarks digging is extra hard, involving more rock moving than soil work. I haven't had any rabbits eat any of my small oak seedlings yet, but I do put wire baskets over them anyway, just in case. I've already lost enough small trees to the rabbits.
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On 23 May 2004 10:38:34 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (JNY) wrote:

http://www.treesaregood.com/treecare/tree_planting.asp
Make sure you do not plant too deeply. The first major root flares should be visible at soil level. Better to plant to high than too low.
K For more info about the International Society of Arboriculture, please visit http://www.isa-arbor.com/home.asp . For consumer info about tree care, visit http://www.treesaregood.com /
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TRees have trunk flares not root flares. see www.treedictionary.com The flares are trucnk tissues and should not be burried. Some pot grown plants are real bad for being planted in the pots to deep. Pot put is bad.
Better to plant to high than too

Better to plant at the depth the roots are coming off the trunk. Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr. Tree Biologist http://www.chesco.com/~treeman Beware of so-called TREE EXPERTS who do not understand TREE BIOLOGY! www.treedictionary.com
(JNY) wrote:

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