Lemon and Lime Seed - Help?

I have some lemon and lime seeds. What kind of advice can you give me on starting them?
chaz-
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I have taken several citrus courses in the past month. I got hooked on oranges. One of the courses said to take the citrus seed from the fruit (fresh)(if you can't plant immediately, put in a plastic bag with some moisture in the refrigerator and wait until you can) and plant in soil, keep moist and warm at a minimum of 65 degrees F. Putting them in an oven (an off oven ) with the door works. I planted:
1. Nu Clementine Mandarin. Bright orange flesh with a good taste on a thin skinned tangerine.
2. Pong Koa Manadrin. A large fruit for a mandarin. The fruit is very uniform in shape, size and color (a yellow-orange color) and has a fairly thin peel. The fruit quality is outstanding-crisp, sweet, and flavorful. It has a clear medium orange flesh, juicy, sweet and very full flavored. Is cold hardy.
3. Changsha tangerine produces a brilliant orange, sweet, but acidic fruit that is seedy. Ripens Oct - Jan and is highly freeze resistant. Groes true from seed.
4. A mystery orange of Mexican descent
In 30 days, the Nu Clementine, Pong Koa and Changsha all germinated and are in bright light in a window sill (about 2 1/2 -3 inches tall). They are photosynthesizing and the leaves are getting bigger.
TANGERINE, MANDARIN, TANGELO, SATSUMA
Citrus are evergreen trees and shrubs, with glossy green leaves year-round, and many also offer fragrant blooms. Plant them in an area that receives at least day of sun; citrus do not require full sun as most other fruit trees do. The size of the trees varies depending on the variety, from medium shrub to large tree. They do not need pollinators. Pay close attention to the freeze tolerance of each variety, for freeze tolerance varies. Citrus cannot tolerate standing water.
Satsumas are a variety of tangerine. Buy early, mid and late season varieties to have months of ripe fruit harvests. All Satsumas are cold tolerant to at least 26 degrees and perhaps more. They grow in a weeping posture and can become about 10' tall and 10' wide.
J http://www.celestialhabitats.com (I have 6 good citrus links on this site)
chaz wrote:

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Celestial Habitats by J. Kolenovsky
2003 Honorable Mention Award, Keep Houston Beautiful
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Hi! I read the responses to your post and am I baffled! I would swear that I was taught that you CAN grow the seeds but the plant/tree won't bear, and that it had to be grafted to a base tree in order to have the graft bear. Tell me I'm wrong? Tell me I'm right?
Mike Picture Rocks, AZ
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Mike, from the 2 courses I took, one can grow a tree from seed and it will bear fruit. One has to wait till the fruit is evaluated to see if the seed was true. Different species have different characteristics. Grafting can combine good characteristics from different plants. A lot of citrus is grown on "trifoliate rootstock" which is grafted on for its cold tolerance.
Cold Hardy Citrus As citrus trees are basically subtropical or tropical I am often asked for information regarding their cold hardiness. Most citrus will not tolerate temperatures below -2 C. For those of you who live in regions where the winter chill regularly falls below this temperature there are many preventative measures and cultural practices you can follow to grow citrus successfully.
Cold Hardy Variety Selections
Trifoliate orange is an inedible citrus used as a rootstock. It withstands the lowest temperatures of all citrus followed by kumquat, satsuma mandarin, calamondin, mandarin, orange, grapefruit, lemon, lime and citron. Considered cold hardy to about -15F, its range of cultivation can be extended into zone 5 if it is planted in a sheltered location and perhaps given some extra protection. Grapefruit, lemon, lime and citron being cold sensitive. Satsuma and kumquats are the most prominent of the cold hardy citrus.
Cold Hardy Sweet Oranges Hamlin and Navel Oranges are the most cold tolerant of the oranges. If on trifoliate rootstock they exhibit the maximum cold-hardiness, with swingle and sour orange following.
Cold Hardy Mandarins The Sunburst Mandarin is one of the most cold hardy again with maximum cold hardiness being achieved when budded onto trifoliata or sour orange rootstock. Satsuma Mandarins are the most cold-tolerant of commercial citrus, with mature dormant trees having survived temperatures as low as -9C with serious injury. The Satsuma is adapted to regions that are too cold for most other citrus. The Satsuma tree is vigorous, of medium size and very productive. Maximum cold hardiness is achieved when budded onto trifoliate rootstock.
Cold Hardy Kumquats Kumquats exceed even satsuma in terms of cold-hardiness being able to sustain temperatures as low as -12C when dormant. Trifolate is the recommended rootstock when growing kumquats in cold areas.
Planting site When planting in cooler climates give some thought to the planting site. Cold air drains downhill so higher elevations are somewhat warmer than sites at the bottom of a slope. Planting citrus near a house or other building will also offer protection. The building will act as a windbreak, forcing cold air up and over it and therefore over the citrus also. The house itself radiates considerable heat some of which will be absorbed by the plants.
Cultural Practices The soil under and around cold sensitive trees should be free of weeds and mulch. These act as insulators preventing warmth from the sun from entering the soil during the day. This warmth is stores in the soil for release during the night. A clear surface allows maximum heat absorption during the day and maximum heat radiation at night. It is also recommended that soil be kept moist as it will absorb more heat than a dry soil. Keeping your trees strong and healthy through good care will also help them to withstand cold temperatures.
Cold Protection For more information on how to protect your trees during winter visit the July 2001 newsletter.
Fahrenheit to Celsius Conversion Chart For those of you in cooler climates you may find this chart interesting when referring to text printed in the USA. It is a simple http://www.crh.noaa.gov/pub/temp2.htm
Kumquats - The cold hardy Jewels of the Citrus Family Many people think of kumquats as a tart fruit that is only used in preserves. However their are two varieties, the Nagami and Meiwa that are bite-size fruit eaten skin and all. They have a wonderful combination of tangy and sweet flavours. They are becoming more and more common on the supermarket shelves and are an ideal snack for school
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Celestial Habitats by J. Kolenovsky
2003 Honorable Mention Award, Keep Houston Beautiful
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This describes when grafting and budding occurs:
A. Grafting for Clonal Selection and Propagation of Otherwise Difficult-to-Clone Plants
1. When a plant must be clonally propagated to maintain a selected genotype (cultivar , new sport ), but is difficult to propagate vegetatively by cuttings or other means, it is often grafted or budded.
a. Shade tree cultivars of several difficult-to-root species are routinely budded:
Norway Maple (e.g. Acer platanoides 'Crimson King') Green Ash (e.g. Fraxinus pennsylvanica 'Marshall's Seedless') Honeylocust (e.g. Gleditsia triacanthos inermis 'Moraine') Littleleaf Linden (e.g. Tilia cordata 'Greenspire') b. Other ornamental cultivars
(1) Cultivars of selected Pinaceae (Pine Family) species with unusual growth forms
Dwarf Pine cultivars Blue Spruce cultivars such as Picea pungens 'Pendens' (2) Bloodgood Japanese Maple (A. japonicum 'Bloodgood') (3) Taxus bacatta 'Repandans' (4) Upright Juniper cultivars
c. Find out about these and other ornamental plants. The Nursery Web has links to many Plant Identification websites
2. Economics - sometimes grafting is less expensive than cuttage
This is a corollary to A.1. above, since if a selection is difficult to root, grafting is usually cheaper than cuttage. a. Although labor for grafting per se is usually more costly than cuttage (more time-consuming per unit, and more skilled), the cost of materials and equipment may be lower if cuttage requires long periods in a heated greenhouse, with bottom heating, mist, etc. b. Cost analysis: Flowering dogwood cultivars: This is the result of an economic analysis of costs for production of flowering dogwood cultivars by either budding or cuttings ( Badenhop, 1986).
3. Budding for delayed self-rooting of slow-to-root species / nurse (root) grafting (NRG)
a. Some species are difficult to root from cuttings, because a conventional cutting cannot stay alive long enough for rooting to occur. Such "cuttings" may be grafted to a piece of root to keep them alive long enough for them to become self-rooted. This is called nurse root grafting. The graft union is planted below the soil line (unlike most grafting), and eventually the scion becomes self rooted. Afterwards, the rootstock can either be deliberately removed or it will die off, especially in cases where the scion and rootstock are not closely related, resulting in a delayed graft incompatibility. Incompatibility is discussed in the section on Compatibility.
In what way is the process of nurse grafting similar to layering?
Examples:
(1) Lilac (Syringe vulgaris), until the advent of micropropagation, was commonly nurse root grafted to California privet (Ligustrum ovalifolium). Both of these genera are in the Oleaceae family.
The root piece is typically whip and tongue grafted at the bench during winter, stored in a cool place where graft union formation occurs, and then lined out in the field in the spring, where scion rooting occurs. Eventually the graft union fails due to delayed incompatibility, and the privet root piece dies. The likelihood, overall (for any kind of plant), of an intergeneric graft like this being a compatible scion/stock combination is low. Alternatively lilacs may be nurse root grafted onto one year old root pieces of seedling Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica, also in the Oleaceae). In recent years, most lilacs are propagated by tissue culture (micropropagation). Nurse root grafting has lost popularity because sometimes the graft union fails before the scion becomes self rooted, or it will not fail at all, or the rootsystem will sucker, eventually outgrowing the lilac scion. In the image shown here, this nurse root grafted lilac apparently did not self root, and after several years, the lilac/privet graft union broke apart (delayed incompatibility), killing the lilac. (2) Avocado. Nurse seedling graft of avocado rootstocks by the Frolich
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Celestial Habitats by J. Kolenovsky
2003 Honorable Mention Award, Keep Houston Beautiful
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