Leaf Mold, Do Tell..

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Charlie wrote in

i don't see using liquid waste as self-cannibalism, just being practical (assuming no hepatitis or other issues precluding said use). i live in an old house (1815). i have at least one grave in my pasture (her name was Sally Batchelder). i bought this place 9 years ago. last week the previous owner came over to spread ashes of his daughter... returning her to where she grew up. it's a good circle, really. lee
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cat daddy wrote:

Take it that works better than fresh grass clippings, then.. I may try that at some time.. Thanks! :)
We've got a HUGE pecan tree on the property, plus an oak, 2 elms, 3 chestnut.. Quite a bit to make use of..
Minus the black walnut which I can't use for anything. :|
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On Tue, 09 Oct 2007 22:14:45 -0500, Scott Hildenbrand

Banana Nut Bread.
Black Walnut meats are the best for it.
Care Charlie
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Charlie wrote:

Nut the nuts.. The leaves and shells.. I can't use THEM for anything since they have a herbicide property.. Would end up with the mulch of death for my lilies.. 8'o
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On Tue, 09 Oct 2007 22:29:29 -0500, Scott Hildenbrand

I know.....the damn things are hell on garden areas as well. The hulls are a staining nightmare on everything. Isn't it great when the squirrels start in on them and drop hull pieces on your vehicle and stain the hell out of the finish?
Most people don't care for the nuts either.
Charlie
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Charlie wrote:

Haven't had the pleasure of that yet since we just moved in.. However it reminds me of when I was living in PA. Had black berries growing wild as well as a huge mulberry tree.. Needless to say when they were ripe, they poop purple...
Odd color to smear across your window with the wiper blades..
So how do you hull your nuts? I'd heard of people using old corn hullers on them..
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On Tue, 09 Oct 2007 23:04:55 -0500, Scott Hildenbrand

Heh heh......mulberry poop.........I know it well. :-)
The old hand powered corn hullers work great on them, particularly if you are doing lots of them, after drying. Others just pour them on their driveway and drive over them for a while. Extra work that is.
We don't crack a lot now.......enough for a few quarts of meats. I just let them dry and break the hulls off by hand, wearing gloves........when I am just sittin' and enjoying the late fall weather. Raked up a couple bushels last week and they are drying in the shed.
No fancy cracker either......just a hammer and a small chunk of rail.
Charlie
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Oh yeah. And, especially when there are no fresh clippings and tons of leaves. I've also used alfalfa meal and alfalfa tea to fertilize pecans in the Spring. Great source of nitrogen, trace minerals and growth stimulants.

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On 10/9/2007 7:28 PM, Scott Hildenbrand wrote:

I just toss the leaves on a pile. It's in an out-of-the-way corner where a block wall makes a turn. Every so often (not often enough), I wet it down. Every so often (again not often enough), I use a spading fork to turn it over. In the fall, I pull the pile apart, put fresh leaves at the bottom, and rebuild the pile with the old leaves and partially decomposed matter on top.
This is indeed mostly leaf mold. It's about 95% dead leaves and 5% grass clippings. The clippings are from my red fescue lawn, which is mowed only once or twice a year. The leaves are oak, liquidambar, zelkova, and ash.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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On Tue, 09 Oct 2007 21:28:24 -0500, Scott Hildenbrand

I'd just pile them up. A chicken wire ring will help contain them. It is true that putting leaves through a shredder will speed up the decomposition process, but this is not necessary. You can mix in some green (grass clippings, etc) to add some nitrogen.
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On Oct 9, 10:28 pm, Scott Hildenbrand

There is no need to shred the leaves unless you need to hurry nature. There is no need to add nitrogen unless you need to hurry nature. A pile large enough to insulate itself will heat and begin to break down all on it's own.
If you want to hurry or use the leaves as mulch and don't want them to mat down, run them over with a mower a time or two. A wall or plank for a backstop helps.
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beecrofter wrote:

I think your post explained it the best in terms of shredding and greens.. ;)
Thanks!
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