Irrigation System (not drip) Installation Questions

Hi, I am planning to install a small DIY irrigation system in my 1000 sq. foot backyard. I have a hose spigot in the back of the house, and have been told that for a small system I can probably connect it directly to the spigot rather than running a new water line before the spigot. Can anyone advise on this? The system I envision would be set up like a drip system, but using conventional RainBird (or equivalent) pop up heads. I would connect an anti-siphon valve to the spigot, then a battery operated timer, then PVC pipe would run into the ground and out to the yard. Any advice is appreciated. I don't need multiple zones and would like to do this as simply as possible.
thanks, Justin
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You sound like you have done a lot of the homework already! You might also need a pressure regulator* and a fertilizer injector, and you'll probably want to install a 2- to 4-way splitter at the spigot so that you don't have to undo the connection to the PBC pipe when you want water for other things, like to fill a bucket or wash hands.
*if the line pressure is too much higher than what your system needs.
cheers,
Marj
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Your spigot is, in all likelihood, on a half inch supply line, which is probably not sufficient for the volume of water an irrigation system uses. Also, you will be disabling your spigot, if I read your plan correctly, as you would have to go inside, shut off the water, go outside and disconnect the irrigation system and shut off the spigot, go inside and turn the water on, then go outside to use the spigot, all just to use the spigot, then reverse the whole process to restore the sprinkler. Also, around here where we have freezing winters, PVC isn't the best choice for lines, as it is said to be easily cracked during freezes.
Enough of the negativity. My suggestion would be to replace the supply line with a larger line, put a T in it outside to hang the spigot, then continue the larger line into a buried control box. Run control wires along with the supply line into the control box, and you can use an indoor controller, which gives more flexibility than a timer. Depending on your water pressure and volume and topography, having more than one zone may be a good idea, as it takes high pressure to pop up the valves; the reduced pressure for a drip system won't do it, and the parts for a second or third zone cost relatively little. One other suggestion is to get all your supplies from an irrigation supply house (I think the Rainbird website lists those that handle their stuff) rather than from a home center; the home centers carry the lowest grades and change allegiances often, so getting replacement parts there, or even a good assortment, is often problematic.
I had my back yard installed professionally, then shamelessly copied his work to do my front yard a few years later. I think the irrigation system is a good investment, as it seems to use less water (I set it to go off at 5 in the morning, since it uses all our water pressure but we aren't up then, and for shorter and more frequent periods. The water soaks in rather than being evaporated by the sun, and our lawn and flowers and garden all are in much better shape than before we had it.
Justin wrote:

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You don't need multiple zones only if your water supply can operate the entire setup and all of it's heads simultaniously. I doubt a 10 x 100 or 25 x 40' area can be effectively watered using only one "zone" of popup spray heads with a 1/2" supply pipe unless you have really high water pressure.
Your best bet is to purchase the piping and fittings and spray heads and whatever cheap-o mock-up plastic fittings you'll need to build the system and connect it to the spigot before digging or burying anything. Then run it above ground and see if it works before you commit yourself to one zone.
Also, as others suggested, it's easy enough to convert a single spigot to a 2 or 3 spigot in case you need more than one zone and timer and still want to use a hose occasionally w/o having to disconnect anything.
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thanks all for the insight. I am now planning to install a "T" and run the irrigation off a separate line from the spigot. Also will do multiple zones. Thanks!
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