how to make soil amendments without digging up the yard?

Page 2 of 2  


I wasn't sure, if that was what you meant, or the inedible remains of slaughtered animals.
Thanks for the response.
--
<
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hYIC0eZYEtI

<http://www.democracynow.org/blog/2011/3/7/michael_moore
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
be given> wrote:

Well I do know people who have very large shredding machine who pick up roadkill (eg dead roos, wombats etc), shove the roadkill through the shredder and then throw in either cardboard boxes or hay bales to clean out the lingering remains. I guess that would achieve a similar result.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
FarmI wrote:

Do they run a soup kitchen?
D
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just saw a few minutes on TV on how they recycle the waste food from Las Vegas a very small USA city. Trucked away looking like garbage cooked and stirred and called slop. Then transferred to a pig farm. Got me thinking about Prions (Bacon to Bacon) and fasting tonight.
Whew..
--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

http://uppitywis.org/ live WI
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
be given> wrote:

I'm pretty sure that would be illegal here. I'm sure it is in the UK since the last but one foot and mouth outbreak. IIRC, that outbreak was in the early 2000s and was supposedly caused from restaurant scraps which had a furrin origin.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<http://www.democracynow.org/2010/8/24/david_kirby_on_the_looming_threat
Something else we feed chickens that people dont realize is beef products. And when those chickens eat that beef product, some of it falls into their litter. Well, we produce so much chicken litter in this country, because of these factory farms, and it is so rich in phosphorus and nitrogen, its land application uses are limited. So you have surplus chicken litter and nothing to do with it. What do they do with it? They feed it to cattle. So we feed beef cows chicken crap. That chicken litter often contains bits and byproducts of cattle. So we are actually feeding cattle to cattle, which is a risk factor for bovine spongiform encephalopathy, better known as mad cow disease. We actually feed cattle products to cattle in three different ways: chicken litter, restaurant scraps, and blood products on dairy farms. And all the mad cow cases in this country came from mega-dairies where, when that calf is born, they remove it from its mother immediately, because that mothers milk is a commodity, its worth money, so instead they feed that calf a formula that includes bovine blood products, and again increasing the risk of mad cow disease.
--
<
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hYIC0eZYEtI

<http://www.democracynow.org/blog/2011/3/7/michael_moore
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OMG! I feel sick just thinking about eating any US beef or eggs after reading that. Are consumers are warned of those practices?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not by the corporate media. That's 90% of American media that is owned by 5 corporations.
--
<
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hYIC0eZYEtI

<http://www.democracynow.org/blog/2011/3/7/michael_moore
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
be given> wrote:

LOL. We're too deeply rural for them to get any customers except roos or wombats. The use the shredder goo to fertilise their wind breaks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
FarmI wrote:

OK if the pH needs to be raised. As you say use it sparingly as it is quite alkaline and some of the alkaliine stuff (the potassium salts) are soluble and so fast acting. For a novice there are safer alternatives.

Blood and bone would be fine.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Have not followed the treads but assume green manure has been mentioned. Blood and bone is expensive I use as a special treat for bulbs.
--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

http://uppitywis.org/ live WI
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm not sure that in one season that pulses would add enough nitrogen for tomatoes, peppers, or corn.
--
<
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hYIC0eZYEtI

<http://www.democracynow.org/blog/2011/3/7/michael_moore
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and caldron bubble. Fillet of a fenny snake, In the caldron boil and bake; Eye of newt, and toe of frog, Wool of bat, and tongue of dog, Adder's fork, and blind-worm's sting, Lizard's leg, and owlet's wing, For a charm of powerful trouble,
And then there are the modern methods with known weights and measures
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

neighbors will help out), and hopefully they are pastured egg shells (the eggs will be better for you). It's what I do.
Obviously, if your in a rush and have money to burn, I'd probably do rock phosphate at 50 lbs.(24 kg) per 1000 sq. ft.(100 sq. m.), unless you wanted to adjust the pH upwards.

the beds. I've had time. Hopefully, I'll have more. And the shells disappear, eventually. It's gardening;O)

--
<
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hYIC0eZYEtI

<http://www.democracynow.org/blog/2011/3/7/michael_moore
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

Bone meal would probably be the quickest, without changing the pH.
--
<
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hYIC0eZYEtI

<http://www.democracynow.org/blog/2011/3/7/michael_moore
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Sheesh! I just wasted some time typing a response.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually you can David, a quick method is to microwave them for a minute to cook up the leftover liquid inside, put in a coffee grinder dry...they powder up really well, but as you said, that is a lot of eggs!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gunner wrote:

That may be of some use but I doubt that it is a fine as a high quality garden lime. What we need to be sure is some measure of the grain size but that is unlikely.
For those who are wondering what we are jabbering on about this is the issue. Garden (agricultural) lime is calcium carbonate which needs to dissolve in the water in the soil to be effective in either supplying calcium or raising pH. The problem is that lime is only very slightly soluble in water. Look at all those limestone and marble monuments (also calcium carbonate) around the place, they last for thousands of years (unless you get acid rain like the parthenon). The method of speeding up the process is to grind it finely which increases the surface area and so the rate of solution, even so it takes months to work. The degree of fineness matters. Take a cube one centimetre on the edge, its surface area is 6 sq cm. Grind it into grains 0.1 cm on edge, the surface area is now 60 sq cm, grind it finer to .01 cm on edge and the area is now 600 sq cm.
A new lime supplier started up round here who was cheaper than the rest. The farmers who lime their pasture though this was great until they realised that it was not as fine as the stuff they were used to.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"David Hare-Scott" wrote

Grin, I do save up the shells to amend a small container but I'm not sure it really does much. More of a science experiement for the fun of it. That container is used for spinaches and such.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ted, go get yourself tested.
Don't follow advice that may be well intended, but inaccurate for your situation. Do you ask for medicine recommendations online?
There are too many factors you need to know specifically, is your organic matter % too low? the CEC out of whack, your pH too high? What are the Ca levels to make you think you need more? Is it to bring the pH up a bit? what are your Mg levels. So do you use Calcitic or Dolomite lime and at what rate? I was very surprised to read that I had to use both types this year and at quite different rates, one for the garden and one for the lawn right next to each other
If you are in the US. The UMass ( http://www.umass.edu/soiltest/ ) has a soil test for 15$ that will give you a complete readout and recommendations to follow for your specific situation instead of this generalized, generic "advice". I usually get the results emailed to me within 2 days of reciept and a hard copy followup w/in a week. Your country extension agent will have more info and other choices. If outside the US I am sure you have proper labs available to you that do the same if you ask around. They also give organic recommendations and ways/methods to measure them.
And NO...If you follow directions, lime ( nor fertilizers) will not kill your soil, despite all the green noise you get from here.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.