Hedge right next to fence = problem ?

I am thinking of planting a visual screen right next to a 3 rail split rail fence, which is 14 years old and rotting somewhat. The hedge will probably be something tall like arbor vitae, so will blow in the wind. I might plant the AV about 2 feet away from the fence, and then trim the grass behind them with a weed whacker, or put down mulch.
My question is : even with a new strong fence, are there problems with planting arbor vitae right next to a wooden split rail fence ? Roots, rubbing, interference, etc. ?
Thanks
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Sue, Thanks. I want the living visual screen to be tall, so maybe AV are not the choice if they're going to break off in winter. I get lots of snow and ice here in Pa.
Maybe some pine trees of some sort.
I hate all the needles and dead grass under pines though. hmmm....
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There is a pine tree right behind the trailer I rent and I sweep off the pine needles from the roof and collect them from around the trailer and take them out to my desert field garden and add them to the soil, my iris and my canna love them that way. Also they make a good blanket of mulch for the canna during the winter too, so I don't have to left them, and in spring time, I cover them with steer manue and presto, foor for the canna and earth worms too.
So hay, I'll take as many as you can send me ;}
-- "In this universe the night was falling,the shadows were lengthening towards an east that would not know another dawn. But elsewhere the stars were still young and the light of morning lingered: and along the path he once had followed, man would one day go again."
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Well, as I said, the tops of them usually don't usually break, they bend. The problem is, at least visually, that they don't bend back. And the Christmas day storm that did that kind of damage around here was unusual--it could be twenty years before those same kind of conditions occurred again. On the other hand, it could be a few months.....
I have some Hinoki cypress that (knock wood) seem to handle snow and ice well, and I have let them get quite tall. For some reason all I ever see in the nurseries lately are the dwarf versions, but the tall ones are quite beautiful and worth searching out, or at least putting on your list of things to research.
Cheers, Sue
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